Girl kicked out of school for pink hair

The Man

Former Staff
Jul 2011
45,155
31,772
Toronto
#1

15 year old Zina (Zinaida) Agisheva, from Russian city of Perm, who was arbitrarily suspended right on the first week of school, for the horrible crime of having her hair dyed as you see there lol

According to the suspension paper she posted online, she will so remain until the issue (of her hair) is rectified, and they have also requested a meeting with her mother


They have messed with wrong mother, however.

Nadezhda Agisheva

is an outspoken member of the local legislature; and is fiercely protective services of her kids, typical Russian mother bear lol

She now intends to give that school a hell of a peace of her mind: https://www.eg.ru/politics/615723-v-permi-doch-deputata-vygnali-iz-shkoly-za-rozovye-volosy-079243/

I know that schools over there have been trying to control how girls especially dress and act on the premises.

There have been many concerns that young ladies these days over there dress way too sexy to school

This, in turn, distracts the boys from their studies and has actually been one of the factors blamed for falling grade averages among young men. No joke :D

But, kicking someone out for dying her hair seems a tad extreme...
 
Jul 2018
775
877
North Carolina
#2

15 year old Zina (Zinaida) Agisheva, from Russian city of Perm, who was arbitrarily suspended right on the first week of school, for the horrible crime of having her hair dyed as you see there lol

According to the suspension paper she posted online, she will so remain until the issue (of her hair) is rectified, and they have also requested a meeting with her mother


They have messed with wrong mother, however.

Nadezhda Agisheva

is an outspoken member of the local legislature; and is fiercely protective services of her kids, typical Russian mother bear lol

She now intends to give that school a hell of a peace of her mind: https://www.eg.ru/politics/615723-v-permi-doch-deputata-vygnali-iz-shkoly-za-rozovye-volosy-079243/

I know that schools over there have been trying to control how girls especially dress and act on the premises.

There have been many concerns that young ladies these days over there dress way too sexy to school

This, in turn, distracts the boys from their studies and has actually been one of the factors blamed for falling grade averages among young men. No joke:D

But, kicking someone out for dying her hair seems a tad extreme...
She is an attractive young lady. Her pink colored hair, I would bet, has nothing to do with her being a distraction for the young men there LOL.

For me it would depend if the rules specifically called out that colored hair would = a suspension. I didn't find anything saying that specially anywhere in your post, but correct me if there is. There is the suspension letter I did see, but sorry I can't read Russian. I did see where it stated, "The girl was removed from school for violating the requirements for appearance" , but that would be very vague IMO. So, what I'm saying is IF she didn't know (or better yet it wasn't specifically stated) that coloring her hair would be a violation, how can they retroactively enforce that rule?

Anyhow, colored hair equaling a suspension is on the borderline of ridiculousness in my most humble American opinion.
 
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The Man

Former Staff
Jul 2011
45,155
31,772
Toronto
#3
She is an attractive young lady. Her pink colored hair, I would bet, has nothing to do with her being a distraction for the young men there LOL.

For me it would depend if the rules specifically called out that colored hair would = a suspension. I didn't find anything saying that specially anywhere in your post, but correct me if there is. There is the suspension letter I did see, but sorry I can't read Russian. I did see where it stated, "The girl was removed from school for violating the requirements for appearance" , but that would be very vague IMO. So, what I'm saying is IF she didn't know (or better yet it wasn't specifically stated) that coloring her hair would be a violation, how can they retroactively enforce that rule?

Anyhow, colored hair equaling a suspension is on the borderline of ridiculousness in my most humble American opinion.
To be fair, her school is apparently a gimnazia, which sounds like the English term "gymnasium" lol but it has a very different meaning, over there.

It goes back to the pre-Soviet era, before the 1917 Revolution.

Back then, lower class peasant children went to regular "state schools"

and that was since the reign of Empress Catherine the Great, who finally established this, some kind of an education system for regular mortals. Before her, the peasants, the serfs, as most of them were (Russian peasants would be emancipated, finally, in the 1860s, around the same time as the black people in the US...) were not even entitled to any education. You don't need to go to school to plough your master's fields (for the males) or breed more serfs (for the females)... Catherine, at least, gave those people a chance to learn to fucking read and write, for first time in pretty much their whole history... I guess it helped that she was not herself Russian, but German, by birth, a Romanov by way of marriage, not blood. Coming from Europe, the shit she saw on those serf farms must have horrified her...

Anyhow, the children of the elite, meanwhile, those of royal or aristocratic blood, and those of wealthy merchants or industrialists (which were not always aristocrats, because, for example, Jews were not allowed to hold noble title; thus you could be rich, yet still inferior, back then... Russia always was a nasty place that way...) went to special, high end schools, the "gymnasiums", many of them gendered, only for boys or for girls



The Church was heavily involved in these schools too


The goal, after all, was to raise these upper echelon kids as pious Orthodox Christians of high moral standing lol

Aside from that little national peculiarity though, these gymnasiums (and "lyceums", even MORE snobby and elitist schools for the rich they had then haha) were modeled, in many ways, on the British elite boarding school system. I think they even imported some actual British teachers for them back then too, to train the kids in foreign languages and such...

Naturally, all of this went away after 1917.

But after '91, in post-Soviet Russia, the gimnazia has reappeared. At the very least, these days, it has become fashionable for the nicer schools in nicer, wealthier neighborhoods, to title themselves such, to differentiate themselves from the working class riffraff in the poor hoods haha And, gradually, along with the name, many of these modern day gymnasiums have also began adopting some of the old moralistic bs from those original ones, from that, 19th century era...

In some of these places nowadays you even see kids now wearing uniforms harking back to those times; although most are NOT gendered, like the old gymnasiums


They are a lot more conservative than even the regular Russian school system, which itself has grown much more so, especially since Olga Vasilieva, a close friend of the Church, took over as Minister of Education


They try to zombify kids, these days... break their young spirits, with propaganda and such. The government fears the young, so many of them have protested against Putin in Moscow in recent times

not that there aren't also pro-Putin ones too

but, most of them don't watch TV, they get their information from the internet, and the Kremlin cannot control them, as they do with the older generations. This does frighten many of the corrupt bastards up there...

So, the education system, unfortunately, is getting more and more propagandist and repressive, over all...
 
Nov 2015
5,821
1,888
UK
#4
She is an attractive young lady. Her pink colored hair, I would bet, has nothing to do with her being a distraction for the young men there LOL.

For me it would depend if the rules specifically called out that colored hair would = a suspension. I didn't find anything saying that specially anywhere in your post, but correct me if there is. There is the suspension letter I did see, but sorry I can't read Russian. I did see where it stated, "The girl was removed from school for violating the requirements for appearance" , but that would be very vague IMO. So, what I'm saying is IF she didn't know (or better yet it wasn't specifically stated) that coloring her hair would be a violation, how can they retroactively enforce that rule?

Anyhow, colored hair equaling a suspension is on the borderline of ridiculousness in my most humble American opinion.
In the UK, school uniform policy covers length of skirts, hair, shoes, jewellery etc.. Many are sent home in the first few days.

For some reason, some kids and parents find it tricky to comply. One thing is for sure, I would ban mobile phones from schools.
 
Jul 2018
775
877
North Carolina
#6
In the UK, school uniform policy covers length of skirts, hair, shoes, jewellery etc.. Many are sent home in the first few days.

For some reason, some kids and parents find it tricky to comply. One thing is for sure, I would ban mobile phones from schools.
I'm good (agree) if the students / parents / teachers know the rules going into it. Another words if the rules are plainly / clearly stated by the school, and the students know what the rules are then everything is bueno (good):cool:. Saying that, I do think that colored hair equaling a school suspension is ludicrous. As far as the cell phones are concerned, are you saying you would ban them completely on school grounds, or just in the classroom? I understand how disruptive cell phones can be with our youth here in the States (UK is similar?). I would be fine with a ban in the classroom setting; however, I would be ok with allowing kids to use cell phones during lunch, breaks, between classes etc etc. Here in the States before 9-11 happened less students TTBOMK had cell phones. After 9-11 a lot of us parents gave our kids cell phones because we freaked out and wanted a way to communicate with our kids just in case something bad happened again.:mad:
 
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The Man

Former Staff
Jul 2011
45,155
31,772
Toronto
#8
In the UK, school uniform policy covers length of skirts, hair, shoes, jewellery etc.. Many are sent home in the first few days.

For some reason, some kids and parents find it tricky to comply. One thing is for sure, I would ban mobile phones from schools.
Russian schools have uniforms, but there's no single nationwide standard today, like there was in Soviet Union.


In modern Russia, it is left up to individual schools and their principals to set and enforce own dress codes



lol

So, for example, in traditionally Muslim regions, like Chechnya (school in Grozny, below) hijabs are factored into girls uniforms

The non-Muslim regions, on the other hand, ban them strictly. Muslim families in Slavic, Orthodox Christian-majority Stavropol region (near Chechnya), republic of Mordovia (on Volga river), and I believe in Moscow too, battled this all the way to the Supreme Court, and always lost. Putin himself has said that he doesn't want to see hijabs in the schools, outside of the Muslim republics. And that was that.

There are also special portable, moving schools for children of indigenous deer herding tribespeople in Siberia, they are also allowed to wear their own traditional clothes


The Cossacks also run own militarized cadet-type schools for their kids, in places like Krasnodar, in the South, where most of them are concentrated
 
Likes: Akosikojak
Sep 2018
653
185
cleveland ohio
#9
dress codes are fascist, when i was a kid it was the 70s and theyd done away with them, i cant imagine them telling us what to wear or how to wear our hair
 
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The Man

Former Staff
Jul 2011
45,155
31,772
Toronto
#10
dress codes are fascist, when i was a kid it was the 70s and theyd done away with them, i cant imagine them telling us what to wear or how to wear our hair
They can be a good thing... Uniforms can, at least, equalize kids in appearance. Nobody bullying anyone else because they have cooler clothes and such...
 
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