Happy Birthday to America, from Prague

Helena

Former Staff
Sep 2007
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Maybe my user title will provide a clue.
From Prague Castle:

Dear Ladies and Gentlemen, dear friends,

First, let me congratulate all American citizens present here on your Day of Independence! I am very sorry that I cannot be here at this beautiful residence with you today in person, but at least I'll gladly use this opportunity to address you. I ask Ambassador King to convey my congratulations to the American people back in the United States and elsewhere. This is your holiday and you should enjoy it!

As you all know, the Czech Republic has its own Independence Day as well. This year, we will celebrate its 100thanniversary on October 28. During the last one hundred years we have proven many times that our two countries are strong allies, dedicated partners and good friends. Czechoslovakia would have never been established without the help of Americans. America would have never been so great without the contribution of Czechs and Slovaks living in the United States.

Those people came to the New World to enjoy the independence, rights and freedoms we are celebrating here today. But they also helped to make the U.S.A. the strong and great country that it is today.

(….)

Nobody says that everything is perfect. We all know that the bilateral agenda could welcome a fresh impulse. We Czechs and Europeans also know that we must do more to secure our safety. Other challenges come from a certain shift in the priorities of the American administration. However, despite angry tweets and looming tit-for-tat economic measures, it is clear that Europe needs America and America needs Europe.

(….)

Ladies and gentlemen, let me congratulate you again to the Independence Day and wish you enjoy the celebration!

Yours,

Miloš Zeman, the President of the Czech Republic
https://www.hrad.cz/en/president-of-the-cr/current-president-of-the-cr/selected-speeches-and-interviews/a-message-of-greeting-of-the-president-of-the-czech-republic-on-the-occasion-of-the-day-of-independence-of-the-usa-14172

From the US Embassy:

U.S. and Czechoslovak Presidents Woodrow Wilson and Tomáš Garrigue Masaryk (portrayed by actors from the Prague Shakespeare Company) celebrated the 242th anniversary of the Independence of the United States of America at a reception hosted at U.S. Ambassador’s residence in Prague.
Presidents Wilson and Masaryk, accompanied by U.S. Ambassador Stephen King celebrated not only the anniversary, but also marked a centennial of Czech-American diplomatic relations. One hundred years ago, Czechoslovakia declared its independence, and shortly thereafter, the United States established formal diplomatic relations with the new country.
Both Presidents Wilson and Masaryk enjoyed the evening and presented key moments of our shared history and relations 100 years ago.
In addition, Ambassador King announced that, in honor of the U.S.-Czech centennial celebrations this year, the Glorietta, which stands behind the Embassy in Prague – Mala Strana, will be lit in the Czech and American colors of red, white, and blue for the rest of the year.
https://cz.usembassy.gov/presidents-wilson-and-masaryk-celebrated-independence-day-in-prague/
 
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Tedminator

Former Staff
Jun 2010
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yay thanks!:7_4_15:
:f_bubbly::drunks::f_cheers:


As you all know, the Czech Republic has its own Independence Day as well. This year, we will celebrate its 100thanniversary on October 28. During the last one hundred years we have proven many times that our two countries are strong allies, dedicated partners and good friends. Czechoslovakia would have never been established without the help of Americans. America would have never been so great without the contribution of Czechs and Slovaks living in the United States.
Eh? how so?
 

Helena

Former Staff
Sep 2007
5,169
3,186
Maybe my user title will provide a clue.
yay thanks!:7_4_15:
:f_bubbly::drunks::f_cheers:




Eh? how so?
Heh! That's so nice of you to highlight and ask about that part and not this:

America would have never been so great without the contribution of Czechs and Slovaks living in the United States.
:p

In a way, Czechoslovakia was born in the US.

The newly opened Masaryk as a Phenomenon exhibition is inspired by a project of the same name that occupied the New Building of the National Museum from 15 September 2017 to 31 January 2018. It will introduce Masaryk as professor, president, but also as father and husband. Great attention is paid to Masaryk's relationship with the United States of America, which played an important role not only in his personal and working life but also in his "life project" - the promotion of the emergence of an independent Czechoslovakia during the First World War.

One of the most important moments in the formation of the Czechoslovak state was the signing of the Declaration of the Common Aims of the Mid-European Nations in Philadelphia (October 26, 1918). It was signed by representatives of the Czechoslovaks, Poles, Croats, Ukrainians, Ruthenians, Lithuanians, Romanians, Austrians, Turkish Greeks, Albanians, Armenians and Jews - Zionists.
The National Museum presents Tomá? Garrigue Masaryk in Washington. - Národní muzeum

Wiki:

The Pittsburgh Agreement was a memorandum of understanding completed on 31 May 1918 between members of Czech and Slovak expatriate communities in the United States of America. It is named for the city of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, where the agreement was made. The agreement prescribed the intent of the cosignatories to create an independent Czechoslovakia.[1] This was achieved on 18 October 1918, when the primary author of the agreement, Tomáš Garrigue Masaryk, declared the independence of Czechoslovakia. Masaryk was elected the first president of Czechoslovakia in November, 1918.
An agreement was drafted which read:
"1. We approve (sanction) the political program, which endeavors to bring about a Union of the Czechs and Slovaks in an independent state comprising the Czech Lands, (the lands of the Bohemian Crown) and Slovakia.
2. Slovakia will have its own administration, its Diet and its courts."
3. The Slovak language will be the official language in schools and in public life in general (in Slovakia).
4. The Czecho-slovak state will be a republic, its Constitution will be democratic.
5. The organization of the collaboration of the Czechs and the Slovaks in the United States will be amplified and adjusted according to the needs and according to the changing situation, by mutual agreement.
6. Detailed rules concerning the organization of the Czecho-Slovak State are left to the liberated Czechs and Slovaks and their legal representatives (to establish)
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pittsburgh_Agreement

https://books.google.cz/books?id=tWctAgAAQBAJ&pg=PA393&lpg=PA393&dq=Wilson+Masaryk&source=bl&ots=A5947nLSnm&sig=WUaaNvkGDoop87aIMjYANLbVS-0&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwiq2tusjYXcAhXNxqQKHQHQB284HhDoAQg8MAI#v=onepage&q=Wilson Masaryk&f=false

Our first (and founding) president Masaryk's wife, i.e. the first Czechoslovak First Lady, was American, and that was how he added "Garrigue" to his name and has been known as TGM since then. Their son Jan Masaryk, later the head of Czechoslovak diplomacy, was briefly married to a daughter of the first US ambassador to Czechoslovakia. There's much more but I don't have time to go through all the ways the US contributed toward the creation of Czechoslovakia and helped shape its pre-WWII period.

You might have forgotten (or, most likely, never really cared that much), but we remember. :)
 
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Tedminator

Former Staff
Jun 2010
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You might have forgotten (or, most likely, never really cared that much), but we remember. :)
yeah good to know.. I never even knew.

But hey I do remember a Czech castle that keeps bears in it's moat. I like castles, and I like moats plus I also like bears.. so a castle with a moat with bears is even better :applouse:
 
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Helena

Former Staff
Sep 2007
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Maybe my user title will provide a clue.
'Should have included the part about substantial American assistance to Czechoslovak Legions in Russia / the newly emerging USSR:

May 5, 1918 - Masaryk Given a Hero’s Welcome in Chicago. Returning to the city where he taught, the Czech press estimated the crowd at 150,000.
June 19, 1918 - Masaryk Meets with Wilson.
June 28, 1918 - US State Department issues strong statement supporting the freedom of Slavic people from Austro-Hungarian rule. (Shortly thereafter, both France and England recognize Czecho-slovakia as an Allied nation with the Czech National Council as the official government.)
August 1918 - Americans Land in Vladivostok. Major mission - to assist Czechs.
October 18, 1918 - Czechoslovakian Declaration of Independence prepared by Masaryk to remind US of shared values and prevent possible federation with Austria-Hungary.
Legion Timeline:

When Tomáš Masaryk married American Charlotte Garrigue in Brooklyn in 1878, he never dreamed that 40 years later, in 1918, he would be leaving the United States for Europe again - and this time as the President and founder of the new Czechoslovak Republic.

The United States of America and its ideals made a lasting impression on Masaryk, both personally and politically. He was inspired by the religious beliefs of his wife and America’s need to separate church and state. The ideals of the American Revolution, representative democracy, personal liberty, equality of all individuals and, above all, the Republican form of government formed the cradle of the new Czechoslovak state, fought for by the Czechoslovak legions under Masaryk’s leadership during the First World War and supported by the United States and President Wilson.

"I do not have to tell you how moved I was reading your statement of independence," wrote President Wilson to Masaryk in response to the Washington Declaration of Czechoslovak independence. Wilson and Masaryk, two university professors who became politicians and statesmen, two "philosophers on the throne," were the visionaries forming the foundation of this century of deep inspiration and reciprocity between the two countries.
THE STORY OF THE 100 YEARS IN DIPLOMACY - Czech Center New York

But most importantly, bears!

Bear Moat at ?eský Krumlov Castle
 
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boontito

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Jan 2008
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On behalf of my fellow citizens, I sincerely accept your country's wishes for a Happy Birthday.

As they say in Czechish, Aloha and a G'Day, Mate to all.

Arigato.
 
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Helena

Former Staff
Sep 2007
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Maybe my user title will provide a clue.
On behalf of my fellow citizens, I sincerely accept your country's wishes for a Happy Birthday.

As they say in Czechish, Aloha and a G'Day, Mate to all.

Arigato.
Není zač. :)
 
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Jan 2014
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On behalf of my fellow citizens, I sincerely accept your country's wishes for a Happy Birthday.

As they say in Czechish, Aloha and a G'Day, Mate to all.

Arigato.
and I also thank the czech people and their president - my ancestors came from that area. further, please do not always believe the attitudes of the American government is the same as the citizens of America.
 
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