Healthcare can never be a human right.

Apr 2018
107
98
New Hampshire
In spite of what Bernie Sanders says healthcare is not and can never be a human right. As a libertarian I believe people should be able to live their lives as they choose so long as it does not infringe on the rights of others to do the same. I ride a bicycle 50 miles a day over rural roads. At 72 I easily accommodate hills with 10-12 percent gradients and sometimes my total mileage exceeds 400 miles in a week.

I don’t expect others to follow my example; I choose to do this because I am free to do so. My living memory is imprinted with recollections of dearly missed departed friends and relatives; they used tobacco, alcohol and drugs. They danced and never gave a thought to paying the fiddler. But it’s their fiddler’s bill not mine or yours.

In order for me to casually do every day what would kill most people if they tried it once we have to go back about 40 years to choices I made. I was running ten miles a day beginning in the late 1970’s when a lot of people were putting powder up their noses. It was their choice and I minded my own business as a libertarian.

I observed early on that tobacco and alcohol were poison that not only stole my fitness but could kill by corrupting the immune system producing fatal outcomes and shortened lifespans. I just did what I still do and let others do what they chose to do. The fiddler’s bill comes early for many.

Even though I saved thousands from not using tobacco, alcohol and drugs high level cycling is expensive. My number one bike set me back about $7,000 with the special wheels I put on it. My number two bike that I ride when it rains was $5,000.

Even though the health I enjoy today is beyond the pay grade of a lot of healthcare workers I am aging. My cataracts are getting worse and will have to be addressed. I don’t want to pay for someone’s Health choices and I don’t expect anyone to pay for mine.

I don’t want to be taxed for someone’s self-inflicted heart disease, COPD, liver destruction and preventable cancers, Yes, some issues are beyond individual control but most are not. I don’t expect others to buy me new bicycles when I need them. Healthcare is a privilege not a human right.
 

Ian Jeffrey

Council Hall
Mar 2013
78,085
47,866
Vulcan, down the street from Darth Vader
The fundamental rights (per the Declaration of Independence) to life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness are rather less meaningful without a right to health care. (Granted it was not a right in the 18th century - but it was also practically nonexistent then, too.) And most issues requiring health care are beyond individual control; your position on that is backwards.
 
Feb 2010
30,924
34,280
Sunny Bournemouth, Dorset
Healthcare IS a human right in many countries, though not the USA. The Universal Declaration of Human Rights which ironically the USA had a hand in drafting, includes a right to healthcare.

Article 12 requires that “states must protect this right by ensuring that everyone within their jurisdiction has access to the underlying determinants of health, such as clean water, sanitation, food, nutrition, and housing, and through a comprehensive system of health care, which is available to everyone without discrimination, and economically accessible to all.”

Article 25 of the United Nations' 1948 Universal Declaration of Human Rights states that "Everyone has the right to a standard of living adequate for the health and well-being of himself and of his family, including food, clothing, housing and medical care and necessary social services."

Health Care As a Human Right
 
Last edited:
Jul 2013
59,002
65,577
Nashville, TN
In spite of what Bernie Sanders says healthcare is not and can never be a human right. As a libertarian I believe people should be able to live their lives as they choose so long as it does not infringe on the rights of others to do the same. I ride a bicycle 50 miles a day over rural roads. At 72 I easily accommodate hills with 10-12 percent gradients and sometimes my total mileage exceeds 400 miles in a week.

I don’t expect others to follow my example; I choose to do this because I am free to do so. My living memory is imprinted with recollections of dearly missed departed friends and relatives; they used tobacco, alcohol and drugs. They danced and never gave a thought to paying the fiddler. But it’s their fiddler’s bill not mine or yours.

In order for me to casually do every day what would kill most people if they tried it once we have to go back about 40 years to choices I made. I was running ten miles a day beginning in the late 1970’s when a lot of people were putting powder up their noses. It was their choice and I minded my own business as a libertarian.

I observed early on that tobacco and alcohol were poison that not only stole my fitness but could kill by corrupting the immune system producing fatal outcomes and shortened lifespans. I just did what I still do and let others do what they chose to do. The fiddler’s bill comes early for many.

Even though I saved thousands from not using tobacco, alcohol and drugs high level cycling is expensive. My number one bike set me back about $7,000 with the special wheels I put on it. My number two bike that I ride when it rains was $5,000.

Even though the health I enjoy today is beyond the pay grade of a lot of healthcare workers I am aging. My cataracts are getting worse and will have to be addressed. I don’t want to pay for someone’s Health choices and I don’t expect anyone to pay for mine.

I don’t want to be taxed for someone’s self-inflicted heart disease, COPD, liver destruction and preventable cancers, Yes, some issues are beyond individual control but most are not. I don’t expect others to buy me new bicycles when I need them. Healthcare is a privilege not a human right.
And you have socialized Medicare, and when you have that inevitable stroke, heart attack or cancer, you will be glad you have it. Wanting others not to have what you have is pretty chicken shit, don't you think?
 

StanStill

Former Staff
Dec 2013
13,710
15,718
Work
And you have socialized Medicare, and when you have that inevitable stroke, heart attack or cancer, you will be glad you have it. Wanting others not to have what you have is pretty chicken shit, don't you think?
"I don't want to pay for anyone else's health care, and I don't expect them to pay for mine, but you better believe I'll cash that check faster than you can say proctologist."
 
Mar 2012
59,747
41,211
New Hampshire
The problem is if healthcare is a right then it shouldnt be supported by private companies that some cant afford. Public school was made free so all could be educated for the good of society. If healthcare is put on the same level it makes private for profit insurance a hard sell.
 
Apr 2018
107
98
New Hampshire
And you have socialized Medicare, and when you have that inevitable stroke, heart attack or cancer, you will be glad you have it. Wanting others not to have what you have is pretty chicken shit, don't you think?
"I don't want to pay for anyone else's health care, and I don't expect them to pay for mine, but you better believe I'll cash that check faster than you can say proctologist."
When can I expect my new bike?
 
Jun 2014
51,252
52,971
United States
The fundamental rights (per the Declaration of Independence) to life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness are rather less meaningful without a right to health care. (Granted it was not a right in the 18th century - but it was also practically nonexistent then, too.) And most issues requiring health care are beyond individual control; your position on that is backwards.

It wouldn't have made sense for our founding fathers to consider access to medical care a human right. Up until the early 1900s, a visit to a Doctor was more likely to kill you than to heal you. Had modern medicine existed at the time, there is no doubt in my mind that access to healthcare would have been explicitly enshrined as a right to all Americans.