Here is why it’s too early to be excited about Hyperloop in India

Sep 2013
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35,067
On a hill
#1
PRASID BANERJEEMAR 8, 2018, 02.01 PM

India could be one of the first countries to get the Hyperloop.
A lot more work, such as feasibility testing and investments, remains to be done before a working Hyperloop can be established.
Virgin wants to build and operate the Hyperloop here by 2024.

Sitting on the cusp of the future, it's easy to overlook what's in the present.

The Delhi Metro is far from complete, but it's already nearing obsolescence, with bullet trains and Hyperloops on our minds. Transportation was the cornerstone of the industrial revolution, and many have said that Elon Musk's brainchild, the Hyperloop, will lead us into a new world.

At its core, the Hyperloop is a conception that combines aeroplanes and Maglev trains. The proposed, and now tested, concept runs inside vacuum thereby reducing friction to the point where you can be faster on land than in the air. However, it could be too early to get serious about this concept in India.

[video=youtube;Vydb5EBDp6c]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vydb5EBDp6c[/video]

India could be the first to incorporate Hyperloops in its transportation systems. Documents leaked from Hyperloop One in 2016 revealed that a 107-mile (172.2 km) loop would cost $13 billion. For the 140 km (approx. 87 miles) track between Mumbai and Pune, this cost has been estimated at around $310 million.


Cheap, isn't it? That's one of the major advantages of the Hyperloop system. It's not only a futuristic system, it's a futuristic system that (to the end user) costs just as much as a cab ride. If the loop runs at maximum capacity regularly, Hyperloop One could be looking at achieving profits within five years, something most public transport systems fail to do.

Should India look forward to it?

The answer to that question would depend on what India is for you. In the beginning, the Hyperloop will probably be a system meant for businesses. It could help reduce freight times drastically and eventually move to passenger transport. When it does, it will take you between Mumbai to Pune in under 25 minutes.

https://www.businessinsider.in/Here...t-Hyperloop-in-India/articleshow/63203135.cms
 
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Tedminator

Former Staff
Jun 2010
26,851
19,000
South Florida
#4
More expensive than trains, or highways?
Seems like it too me. instead of just train rails, this Hyperloop system requires pressurized tubes to maintain a vacuum. but thats just my guess based on no research :f_online2long:
 
Sep 2013
44,016
35,067
On a hill
#5
Seems like it too me. instead of just train rails, this Hyperloop system requires pressurized tubes to maintain a vacuum. but thats just my guess based on no research :f_online2long:
Isnt maintaining consistent pressure a factor in oil, and gas pipelines? Do you think a vacuum would be all that more complex?
 

Tedminator

Former Staff
Jun 2010
26,851
19,000
South Florida
#6
Isnt maintaining consistent pressure a factor in oil, and gas pipelines? Do you think a vacuum would be all that more complex?
Well yeah a Hyperloop system is more complex than a rail bed and two strips of steel. Don't you think so?
 
Sep 2016
19,462
13,503
My own world
#7
It would be worth it to get that system in large cities like NY where real estate means you can't afford anything in the city. You can live 200 miles away from your job and commute in less than one hour making it possible to have a larger workforce at your disposal if you are an employer. It's a win/win for both business and the individual worker.
 
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Mar 2010
20,196
12,990
Indiana
#8
It would be worth it to get that system in large cities like NY where real estate means you can't afford anything in the city. You can live 200 miles away from your job and commute in less than one hour making it possible to have a larger workforce at your disposal if you are an employer. It's a win/win for both business and the individual worker.
Oh crap there goes the price of real estate sky high in undeveloped so far unblemished parts of upstate New York.
 
Last edited:
Sep 2013
44,016
35,067
On a hill
#10
It would be worth it to get that system in large cities like NY where real estate means you can't afford anything in the city. You can live 200 miles away from your job and commute in less than one hour making it possible to have a larger workforce at your disposal if you are an employer. It's a win/win for both business and the individual worker.
Same goes for the SF bay area.
 
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