Hospital readmissions.

Feb 2015
16,433
8,232
sadness
#21
I have my own suture removal kit along with many other items in my kit. LOL I always removed my own sutures after my surgeries. By the time I go back for my follow up, my suture sites are perfect and very well healed. It was like a obsession with wound care. :)
bwhahaha... so i!! And i get to keep it and not have to watch them just put it in the trash. But damn... the staples can be a bit tricky upside down and backwards. lol.
 
Likes: HCProf

HCProf

Moderator
Sep 2014
27,460
16,557
USA
#22
bwhahaha... so i!! And i get to keep it and not have to watch them just put it in the trash. But damn... the staples can be a bit tricky upside down and backwards. lol.
I have never had staples. They would be tricky. :) Hospitals constantly are monitoring quality control and efficiency. I remember when women were discharged very shortly after giving birth. The time of the delivery determined discharge for births without complications. If a woman delivered in the morning, she could very will be discharged that evening. That lead to a lot of readmissions and the hospitals and insurance companies changed the LOS to 3 days. Hospitals are unique businesses who operate 24/7 while being a people business. It is trial and error sometimes.
 
Likes: syrenn
Sep 2017
5,469
6,530
Massachusetts
#23
Yes, what you describe can be hard on a patient...but that is the norm. How far or annoying coming back to have some procedure done it is not part of the discharge equation. Make no mistake, money is the bottom line. It is very expensive keeping someone in a bed and room just for the convince of the patienter. Coming back to have stitches removed or a having a small test or procedure done is not considered "readmission" but more as follow up.

Have you seen the nosocomial commercials? After some cheom treatments you had to come back for just a single shot.... now they make a patch that will give the shot without coming back.

I personality have been well known for asking for a suture removal kit to take home and remove stitches myself. Granted, not many other people would be willing to do something like that to themselves... but it is very easy.
It strikes me that hospital stays could be much cheaper. I've seen some foreign hospitals and was struck by how stripped-down they were, relative to US hospitals. They didn't skimp on things that are medically important, but there just wasn't as much money and space dedicated to making it seem like a hotel instead of a hospital -- more mass wards, fewer individual rooms, less artwork, smaller rooms, etc. And for patients not confined to bed, it was expected that you'd go to the cafeteria to eat. I suppose there's some cost to the patient in that spartan aesthetic, but it strikes me as a smaller cost than the financial cost imposed by those bells and whistles (especially if they lead to people prematurely being tossed to the curb).
 
Sep 2017
5,469
6,530
Massachusetts
#24
If your airway was closing it is completely reasonable to keep you over night for airway management. Just because you feel better does not mean you will remain better. It also depends on what time you checked in the ER. If it were late, it could be a good idea to stick around. If hospitals were just filling beds they would be filling beds with patients who have non life threatening symptoms. There is a recommended triage chart physicians use that was published by the AMA.
It was, in fact, late at night. I went in after work, was there from maybe 8 pm to 1 am or so, with my symptoms having vanished completely by about 10 pm, and I was ready to go sleep in my own bed. As I recall, I had to sign something saying I checked myself out against medical advice. But, again, I was a short ride away, and I'd been through something similar (angio-edema) a couple prior times, so I knew the timeline of the attacks, where usually it was about three hours between when I felt the first tingle of a problem and when I was having trouble breathing.
 
Mar 2012
55,339
36,869
New Hampshire
#25
It strikes me that hospital stays could be much cheaper. I've seen some foreign hospitals and was struck by how stripped-down they were, relative to US hospitals. They didn't skimp on things that are medically important, but there just wasn't as much money and space dedicated to making it seem like a hotel instead of a hospital -- more mass wards, fewer individual rooms, less artwork, smaller rooms, etc. And for patients not confined to bed, it was expected that you'd go to the cafeteria to eat. I suppose there's some cost to the patient in that spartan aesthetic, but it strikes me as a smaller cost than the financial cost imposed by those bells and whistles (especially if they lead to people prematurely being tossed to the curb).
Dare I say Americans are a bit spoiled? We now have birthing suites with leather recliners for the family, tubs, and a warm home environment. We have suites for those who had open heart surgery to recover with all the amenities from home. Have heard many people complain they had to share a room. I guess for me I would rather get in and out and not worry about the looks or the "warmth" of the place or photos to make it feel like home. I would just rather go home. But I think there have been studies where people get better if they feel better.
 
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HCProf

Moderator
Sep 2014
27,460
16,557
USA
#26
It was, in fact, late at night. I went in after work, was there from maybe 8 pm to 1 am or so, with my symptoms having vanished completely by about 10 pm, and I was ready to go sleep in my own bed. As I recall, I had to sign something saying I checked myself out against medical advice. But, again, I was a short ride away, and I'd been through something similar (angio-edema) a couple prior times, so I knew the timeline of the attacks, where usually it was about three hours between when I felt the first tingle of a problem and when I was having trouble breathing.
Many insurances will not pay a claim if a patient checks out AMA. Just because it worked out 50 times before...airway issues are serious and you might not be so lucky next time. I would not play russian-roulette with airway management.
 
Feb 2015
16,433
8,232
sadness
#27
It strikes me that hospital stays could be much cheaper. I've seen some foreign hospitals and was struck by how stripped-down they were, relative to US hospitals. They didn't skimp on things that are medically important, but there just wasn't as much money and space dedicated to making it seem like a hotel instead of a hospital -- more mass wards, fewer individual rooms, less artwork, smaller rooms, etc. And for patients not confined to bed, it was expected that you'd go to the cafeteria to eat. I suppose there's some cost to the patient in that spartan aesthetic, but it strikes me as a smaller cost than the financial cost imposed by those bells and whistles (especially if they lead to people prematurely being tossed to the curb).
lololololol.... alright i am so going to laugh

how do you think it would go over if we told the uninsured masses that we were going to have new hospitals for the uninsured.. where no medical was skipped but it was going to be as you describe... more spartan.

but thoes with insurance were going to get treatment with the perks....
 
Feb 2015
16,433
8,232
sadness
#28
It was, in fact, late at night. I went in after work, was there from maybe 8 pm to 1 am or so, with my symptoms having vanished completely by about 10 pm, and I was ready to go sleep in my own bed. As I recall, I had to sign something saying I checked myself out against medical advice. But, again, I was a short ride away, and I'd been through something similar (angio-edema) a couple prior times, so I knew the timeline of the attacks, where usually it was about three hours between when I felt the first tingle of a problem and when I was having trouble breathing.
right... basically you refused treatment. You have the right to walk away and refuse anything you dont want.
 
Sep 2017
5,469
6,530
Massachusetts
#29
lololololol.... alright i am so going to laugh

how do you think it would go over if we told the uninsured masses that we were going to have new hospitals for the uninsured.. where no medical was skipped but it was going to be as you describe... more spartan.

but thoes with insurance were going to get treatment with the perks....
It works in other countries. We can make it work here.
 
Apr 2012
58,386
43,245
Englewood,Ohio
#30
Not sure if this fits inbut Hospitals have shorter stay periods because of super bugs that have invaded Hospitals.

Many times it is safer to have out patient surgery than to stay in the Hospital.

Two cases here are notable. A friend had surgery because of serious leg problems. The surgery was fine, pain gone but she developed an infection. Several Hospital visits, numerous setbacks she now wears a-bag for for Antibiotics.


Another went in to have her first baby at 35, last minute CSection after problems developed. Went home, infection in the wound, flesh eating disease.. Aftermany surgeries she is now home with an open wound.

These stories are becoming worse all thet tme. Thanks to too many antibiotics.
 
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