How many children is too many for a sperm donor?

Mar 2012
57,898
39,449
New Hampshire
#1
Interesting dilemma.

The official suitor bios of The Bachelorette, whose 15th season premieres Monday night, are studied attempts at masculine posturing: Chasen became a pilot to impress the ladies. So what should viewers make of Matteo, 25, a management consultant from Atlanta, who says he has fathered 114 children as a sperm donor? As once-secret sperm donations have become discussed more openly, DNA tests and online registries have also revealed cases in which single donors have produced 50, 100, and even 189 biological children. These stories provoke an obvious question: How many children is too many for a single donor?

The U.S. has never considered this issue a necessary one to regulate. While countries like the U.K., Germany, and the Netherlands limit how many children a single donor can have, the U.S. only has voluntary guidelines from American Society of Reproductive Medicine, a professional group for fertility specialists. “It’s concerning to have single donors used too much,” says ASRM’s president, Peter Schlegel, adding that more than 100 times is indeed too many. ASRM guidelines suggest no more than 25 births per sperm donor in a population of 800,000 people, to prevent accidental incest.

No one knows exactly how many donor-conceived children are even born in the U.S. every year. A woman might buy sperm from a bank, get inseminated at her fertility clinic, and then have her baby with her OBGYN. The sperm bank relies on customers to report back, but it has no way of compelling them to do so. Anecdotally, at least, parents and kids curious about their donors have found these records fairly incomplete.

The Trouble With Fathering 114 Kids
 
Apr 2019
335
237
down on Rue Morgue Avenue
#2
It seems like people should focus more on adopting and caring for the existing pool of children in need.

we don't need to make more perfect, beautiful, smart babies. we need to take care of the ones already out there.
 
Mar 2012
57,898
39,449
New Hampshire
#3
It seems like people should focus more on adopting and caring for the existing pool of children in need.

we don't need to make more perfect, beautiful, smart babies. we need to take care of the ones already out there.
From what I am hearing its getting harder and harder to adopt. Expensive too. So I wonder if this becomes the go to option eventually?
 

Djinn

Council Hall
Dec 2007
51,597
38,365
Pennsylvania, USA
#4
I suspect the "114 children" claim is not true.

From the Mayo Clinic:

If your sperm meet the quality standards, you'll be selected as a donor. Keep in mind that most sperm banks limit the number of children your sperm can be used to conceive. However, specific guidelines and limits vary.
 
Mar 2019
755
1,193
TN
#6
I suspect the "114 children" claim is not true.

From the Mayo Clinic:

This doesn't take into account when arrogant and egotistical fertility doctors start using their own sperm to impregnate their patients. Just read an article where a woman found out after meeting what she thought was her biological father, it turned out she had multiple half siblings living in the same area since her actual sperm donor was her mother's now now deceased doctor.
 
Mar 2019
755
1,193
TN
#7
From what I am hearing its getting harder and harder to adopt. Expensive too. So I wonder if this becomes the go to option eventually?

Part of that is the simple fact, the vast majority of adoptive parents want a healthy new born. As a child ages, and/or if it's a minority it's chances of adoption fall dramatically. Even worse if is has health or developmental issues.
 
Mar 2012
57,898
39,449
New Hampshire
#8
This doesn't take into account when arrogant and egotistical fertility doctors start using their own sperm to impregnate their patients. Just read an article where a woman found out after meeting what she thought was her biological father, it turned out she had multiple half siblings living in the same area since her actual sperm donor was her mother's now now deceased doctor.
There was that one doc that fathered over 600 babies.

British man 'fathered 600 children' at own fertility clinic
 
Mar 2012
57,898
39,449
New Hampshire
#9
Part of that is the simple fact, the vast majority of adoptive parents want a healthy new born. As a child ages, and/or if it's a minority it's chances of adoption fall dramatically. Even worse if is has health or developmental issues.
Imagine it must be profit driven to some extent. If a couple comes in and says they want a blond, blue eyed baby with a high IQ, I imagine they must keep going back to the same donors to achieve the same results.
 

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