How White Nationalists See What They Want To See In DNA Tests

boontito

Future Staff
Jan 2008
111,209
105,796
Most Insidious
How White Nationalists See What They Want to See in DNA Tests

Their findings, outlined this month in a study in the journal Social Studies of Science, show that yes, even members who fail to meet their own genetic standards will sometimes share the results.

In response, their fellow white nationalists tend to console them by offering potential reasons the results can’t be trusted. Among them: skepticism about the tests’ interpretations of the science or statistics, conspiracy theories about Jewish-owned genetic testing companies’ multicultural agendas, and reminders about alternative ways of measuring whiteness.


Not surprised at all.

Also, while the subject of the article and the study are very interesting, an interesting side point is how often people only pay attention to data that confirms what they already believe. We see that regularly here at this forum and elsewhere.
 
Dec 2015
18,605
13,989
SoCal
How White Nationalists See What They Want to See in DNA Tests

Their findings, outlined this month in a study in the journal Social Studies of Science, show that yes, even members who fail to meet their own genetic standards will sometimes share the results.

In response, their fellow white nationalists tend to console them by offering potential reasons the results can’t be trusted. Among them: skepticism about the tests’ interpretations of the science or statistics, conspiracy theories about Jewish-owned genetic testing companies’ multicultural agendas, and reminders about alternative ways of measuring whiteness.


Not surprised at all.

Also, while the subject of the article and the study are very interesting, an interesting side point is how often people only pay attention to data that confirms what they already believe. We see that regularly here at this forum and elsewhere.
I don't want to go into my results, but suffice to say I gained a new appreciation for @The Man .
 
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HayJenn

Former Staff
Jul 2014
74,658
66,876
CA
From the link

In hundreds of other responses, users delegitimized the testing company and genetic tests generally or suggested the possibilities of statistical or technical errors.

Despite those limitations, Wendy D. Roth, a professor of sociology at the University of Pennsylvania, said it was well-executed study. In her own work, she has found an inverse dynamic: white people who take genetic tests hoping to find something that makes them feel more “exotic.”

But like the white nationalists, they were also inclined to use only the information that was convenient for them: If a bit of Native American ancestry seemed as if it would impress their friends, for example, then they would embrace it. If they worried they wouldn’t be taken seriously, or thought they might be criticized, then they wouldn’t.

Obviously, this type of selective retention is more benign than selective retention intended to rationalize acts of violence, social exclusion and racist hierarchies. Nonetheless, it’s far from consequence-free, Dr. Roth said. She called it “a new form of white privilege.” “They can reveal and benefit from that feeling of being unique, exotic or distinctive without having to experience the disadvantage that members of those groups have traditionally experienced,” she said.




Wow.