Joe Paterno up for highest U.S. honor

Jul 2011
35,717
3,166
Tennessee
I think well deserved. He's in very good company. He's coached the same team for well over half of his life!!

By Adam Rittenberg
ESPN.com
Joe Paterno has been nominated for the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the highest honor a U.S. citizen can receive.

-----

Created in 1945 by President Harry Truman, the Presidential Medal of Freedom has been awarded to sports figures such as Hank Aaron, Muhammad Ali, former UCLA basketball coach John Wooden and former Alabama football coach Paul "Bear" Bryant.


Penn State coach Joe Paterno nominated for Presidential Medal of Freedom - ESPN

mtm1963
 
Jul 2011
35,717
3,166
Tennessee
for him it's his dedication to teaching young men not just about football and sportsmanship but about life and contributions to their community.
 

Rasselas

Moderator
Feb 2010
71,555
48,662
USA
why would a coach get it..?
College football is a huge institution in the US, with a much older pedigree than professional football--almost as long a pedigree as baseball. Paterno is the winningest coach in the history of the game. He runs a program that pretty much guarantees that most of his players will actually get educations. And he's been coaching for almost 60 years. Until a couple of years ago, he still ran out of the locker room and into the locker room with his players. The fact that he coached for a university that boasts a high percentage of the educated populace (something like one of every 200 college grads in the US got a degree from Penn State) doesn't hurt either.
 
Jul 2010
60
3
College football is a huge institution in the US, with a much older pedigree than professional football--almost as long a pedigree as baseball. Paterno is the winningest coach in the history of the game. He runs a program that pretty much guarantees that most of his players will actually get educations. And he's been coaching for almost 60 years. Until a couple of years ago, he still ran out of the locker room and into the locker room with his players. The fact that he coached for a university that boasts a high percentage of the educated populace (something like one of every 200 college grads in the US got a degree from Penn State) doesn't hurt either.
How much does he actually "coach" though, anymore? I'm asking because I sincerely don't know the answer.

My questioning also doesn't take away from his achievements, but I noticed he doesn't even wear the headgear most all other college/professional coaches use to easily communicate with offensive/defensive/special teams coordinators. That, to me, is about as relevant as the Queen's serious influence in Britian. What's in been? 2 titles in 44 years or so?

:zany:
 

Rasselas

Moderator
Feb 2010
71,555
48,662
USA
How much does he actually "coach" though, anymore? I'm asking because I sincerely don't know the answer.

My questioning also doesn't take away from his achievements, but I noticed he doesn't even wear the headgear most all other college/professional coaches use to easily communicate with offensive/defensive/special teams coordinators. That, to me, is about as relevant as the Queen's serious influence in Britian. What's in been? 2 titles in 44 years or so?

:zany:
Wow. That's really a strong argument for...what exactly? Record: 394–129–3
 
Jul 2010
60
3
Wow. That's really a strong argument for...what exactly? Record: 394–129–3
Well he's not getting an award for his record... or atleast I hope not. I understand he's donated millions and helped a lot of students make the transition from youth to adulthood. Those sort of things should be worthy of the Medal of Freedom... and I don't believe he stands alone in that department.