Kaepernick's phony struggle.

Apr 2018
79
53
New Hampshire
#1
Victimology is a big seller nowadays and it’s producing some unusual superstars of the downtrodden in our society. At the top of the list has to be Colin Kaepernick, the former washed-up NFL quarterback that has rejuvenated his career not by fighting for a position but by kneeling on the sidelines.

Kaepernick has crafted a lucrative hoax that blames his lack of a spot on an NFL team not on his flagging skills but on the NFL’s refusal to let him and others use the massive curb appeal of the NFL as a platform for political activism.

Few quarterbacks in the NFL’s history have been able to stretch quickness and mobility into long careers. Fran Tarkenton, the great quarterback from the Minnesota Vikings and the New York Giants is one that comes to mind, but it’s obvious even to the casual observer that Kaepernick couldn’t hold Tarkenton’s jock strap on the best day of his life.

So Kaepernick has dodged the rushing realities of his diminishing skills by running to the sidelines and bowing his head. He’s even donned an Afro Sheen haircut reminiscent of the 1960’s when black Olympic athletes would hold up a black-gloved hand during the National Anthem.

No one seems to notice that Kaepernick has never even come close to suffering the discrimination those past athletes went through decades ago. No one notices that he is just using them as a gimmick to enrich himself with the self-aggrandizement of victimology at their expense.

The problem the victimologists have is that society has come a long way since the days of Martin Luther king or even Rodney King and a race card buys only a fraction of what it once did. White supremacy consists only of a few occasional, ragtag, sign-carrying KKK members coming out of the cobwebs of ancient history.

The gold mine is drying up and celebrity prospectors like Kaepernick are going for it while it lasts. If anyone wonders what inspired the bizarre actions of Jussie Smollett, just take a long hard look at kaepernick.

But Kaepernick with his sponsors is far more harmful than imitators like Smollett. Kaepernick is involved in the ruination of American football as its market share drops like a stone. We’ll all be watching soccer soon thanks to old Colin and his phony struggle against artificial racism.

It might be time to stop buying Nike’s crappy shoes.
 

johnflesh

Former Staff
Feb 2007
24,650
17,169
Colorado
#3
I never minded Kaep kneeling. It made sense even if it the venue didn't.

What I didn't like was wholesale packaging of the message about Police vs. Black people and selling that to a shoe company.

The message was "Believe in something, even if it means sacrificing anything." And it's a great message, but,

"Anything" in this/his case is millions of dollars a year in Kaep's pocket. I don't begrudge the guy for turning a dollar, but guess who is still getting shafted?

To find Kaep ethical means you have no ethics to begin with.
 
Likes: boontito
Feb 2010
33,581
23,305
between Moon and NYC
#4
Victimology is a big seller nowadays and it’s producing some unusual superstars of the downtrodden in our society. At the top of the list has to be Colin Kaepernick, the former washed-up NFL quarterback that has rejuvenated his career not by fighting for a position but by kneeling on the sidelines.

Kaepernick has crafted a lucrative hoax that blames his lack of a spot on an NFL team not on his flagging skills but on the NFL’s refusal to let him and others use the massive curb appeal of the NFL as a platform for political activism.

Few quarterbacks in the NFL’s history have been able to stretch quickness and mobility into long careers. Fran Tarkenton, the great quarterback from the Minnesota Vikings and the New York Giants is one that comes to mind, but it’s obvious even to the casual observer that Kaepernick couldn’t hold Tarkenton’s jock strap on the best day of his life.

So Kaepernick has dodged the rushing realities of his diminishing skills by running to the sidelines and bowing his head. He’s even donned an Afro Sheen haircut reminiscent of the 1960’s when black Olympic athletes would hold up a black-gloved hand during the National Anthem.

No one seems to notice that Kaepernick has never even come close to suffering the discrimination those past athletes went through decades ago. No one notices that he is just using them as a gimmick to enrich himself with the self-aggrandizement of victimology at their expense.

The problem the victimologists have is that society has come a long way since the days of Martin Luther king or even Rodney King and a race card buys only a fraction of what it once did. White supremacy consists only of a few occasional, ragtag, sign-carrying KKK members coming out of the cobwebs of ancient history.

The gold mine is drying up and celebrity prospectors like Kaepernick are going for it while it lasts. If anyone wonders what inspired the bizarre actions of Jussie Smollett, just take a long hard look at kaepernick.

But Kaepernick with his sponsors is far more harmful than imitators like Smollett. Kaepernick is involved in the ruination of American football as its market share drops like a stone. We’ll all be watching soccer soon thanks to old Colin and his phony struggle against artificial racism.

It might be time to stop buying Nike’s crappy shoes.
Have to disagree. If it had not been for Kaepernick's on field political stunts he would very likely now have a job in the NFL.

He certainly isn't a star quarterback. But he is good/decent. Defininitely enough to be on someone's roster.


But the reality is that he made a political stand that was not compatible with the best interests of his employers. For that he is paying a price.






..
 

boontito

Future Staff
Jan 2008
103,909
92,747
Most Insidious
#5
I never minded Kaep kneeling. It made sense even if it the venue didn't.

What I didn't like was wholesale packaging of the message about Police vs. Black people and selling that to a shoe company.

The message was "Believe in something, even if it means sacrificing anything." And it's a great message, but,

"Anything" in this/his case is millions of dollars a year in Kaep's pocket. I don't begrudge the guy for turning a dollar, but guess who is still getting shafted?

To find Kaep ethical means you have no ethics to begin with.
I'm okay with the bundling of the message with capitalism. Especially if one can not only make a profit, nothing wrong with that as this is America, but possibly see the company co-opting onto your message as a way of spreading it farther and faster than you could've by yourself.

Coca-Cola taught the world to sing in perfect harmony, after all.
 

boontito

Future Staff
Jan 2008
103,909
92,747
Most Insidious
#6
Kaepernick has crafted a lucrative hoax that blames his lack of a spot on an NFL team not on his flagging skills but on the NFL’s refusal to let him and others use the massive curb appeal of the NFL as a platform for political activism.
Disagree. The NFL seems to as well. There was something out there that either proved Kaepernick's case of collusion among NFL owners or would've proved to allude to it otherwise the league wouldn't have settled. The league had the advantage in that case. It was Kaepernick charging that owners colluded to keep him off the field. The league just had to sit back and say "nunt-uh" unless Kaep's legal team could offer up proof. The league settled. Choosing to believe there was nothing to the charges is just fooling yourself. You don't have to believe that Kaepernick is a gifted quarterback or the best QB ever to believe that he was colluded against.
 

johnflesh

Former Staff
Feb 2007
24,650
17,169
Colorado
#7
I'm okay with the bundling of the message with capitalism. Especially if one can not only make a profit, nothing wrong with that as this is America, but possibly see the company co-opting onto your message as a way of spreading it farther and faster than you could've by yourself.

Coca-Cola taught the world to sing in perfect harmony, after all.
This being America is not a reason, it's an excuse.

Coca Cola didn't write that song because people were being unjustly killed by authority institutions.

Imagine being a family of a person who was unjustly killed by police. Do you think they are good with someone turning a profit from their loss?

I wouldn't.
 

boontito

Future Staff
Jan 2008
103,909
92,747
Most Insidious
#8
This being America is not a reason, it's an excuse.

Coca Cola didn't write that song because people were being unjustly killed by authority institutions.

Imagine being a family of a person who was unjustly killed by police. Do you think they are good with someone turning a profit from their loss?

I wouldn't.
I didn't offer up this being America as a reason, that was a joke.

I think that's ignoring context. Kaepernick, after being out of the NFL, continued his pledge to donate $1 million of his salary to various causes, including those associated with the issues that started the kneeling during the anthem. He continue on past that stated goal too. He's also contributed in other ways that align with those issues. Is he profiting personally? Of course. But he's also continuing being an advocate for those people.

All of us eventually have to decide where do you draw the line?

Is a family member or friend who writes a book about their son's unnecessary killing by police, profiting off of their loss? Financially, yes.

Did first responders working overtime at the site profit off of the 9/11 attack? Financially, yes.

Do hobby shops selling models of the Space Shuttle Challenger profit off of the loss of the family members left behind after that explosion? Financially, yes.

Are all those situations the same? I don't think so. But they also all resulted in someone benefiting financially off of someone else's pain too. I'm just not so sure it's always so black and white.
 

johnflesh

Former Staff
Feb 2007
24,650
17,169
Colorado
#9
I didn't offer up this being America as a reason, that was a joke.

I think that's ignoring context. Kaepernick, after being out of the NFL, continued his pledge to donate $1 million of his salary to various causes, including those associated with the issues that started the kneeling during the anthem. He continue on past that stated goal too. He's also contributed in other ways that align with those issues. Is he profiting personally? Of course. But he's also continuing being an advocate for those people.

All of us eventually have to decide where do you draw the line?

Is a family member or friend who writes a book about their son's unnecessary killing by police, profiting off of their loss? Financially, yes.

Did first responders working overtime at the site profit off of the 9/11 attack? Financially, yes.

Do hobby shops selling models of the Space Shuttle Challenger profit off of the loss of the family members left behind after that explosion? Financially, yes.

Are all those situations the same? I don't think so. But they also all resulted in someone benefiting financially off of someone else's pain too. I'm just not so sure it's always so black and white.
I understand what he is donating and the efforts associated with that. To me, what Kaep is, is a good thing. The packaging and selling to Nike is where I draw the line boon. I have decided.
 
Likes: boontito

boontito

Future Staff
Jan 2008
103,909
92,747
Most Insidious
#10
I understand what he is donating and the efforts associated with that. To me, what Kaep is, is a good thing. The packaging and selling to Nike is where I draw the line boon. I have decided.
I understand that. I choose to view it as part of the whole though and not an isolated act.

I have decided too. :D
 

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