Last piece of Relativity theory proved

Feb 2011
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Scientists finally can see the waves of gravity from space proving the last unproven piece of Einsteins theory of relativity. It involved two dark holes merging in space. This pretty much gives a god the goodbye.

http://www.theatlantic.com/science/archive/2016/02/all-physics-is-local/462480/
Einstein’s gravitational waves rest on a genuinely radical idea.


Sean Carroll 8:30 AM ET Science

After decades of anticipation, we have directly detected gravitational waves—ripples in spacetime traveling at the speed of light through the universe. Scientists at LIGO (the Laser Interferometic Gravitational-wave Observatory) have announced that they have measured waves coming from the inspiral of two massive black holes, providing a spectacular confirmation of Albert Einstein’s general theory of relativity, whose hundredth anniversary was celebrated just last year.
 
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Feb 2011
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#2
This is one of those things where 99.999% of people will just have to take physicists words for it. Gravitational waves change the dimensions of the antenna/detector (and everything else the wave hits) by less than a billionth of the size of an atom, in fact smaller than a proton. Impossible thing to try to measure, hence why Einstein said we never would. If we in fact have, that's remarkable, but still nothing most humans will ever grasp, along with the rest of quantum mechanics.
 
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The article I read said how the device was set up and i believe it was some kind of laser device but am not sure.
 
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Interesting, this might explain the "repulsive" effect of gravity at far distances that they claim accelerates the expansion of the universe. It would fit, sorry, not done with Relitivity, yet.
 
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#5
Gravity, according to Relitivity, is actuated by locality. Gravity only has a pull for as long as it "bumps" into other particals of gravity. That would explain the acceleration. Not certain how or how to this....hmmmm.
 
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This is one of those things where 99.999% of people will just have to take physicists words for it. Gravitational waves change the dimensions of the antenna/detector (and everything else the wave hits) by less than a billionth of the size of an atom, in fact smaller than a proton. Impossible thing to try to measure, hence why Einstein said we never would. If we in fact have, that's remarkable, but still nothing most humans will ever grasp, along with the rest of quantum mechanics.
Catching a wave is a tough problem. Gravitational waves bend space only a tiny, tiny amount — a small fraction of the diameter of a subatomic-particle.

Weiss and other researchers spent more than a decade just tinkering, trying to figure out how to do it. Eventually, they came up with a plan.

The idea was to build a giant laser and place it between two-high precision mirrors set in an L-shape. Bouncing light off the mirrors, each of which would be miles away, would provide a stunningly accurate measure of distance. On paper at least, it could detect the stretching and squishing of space by gravitational waves.

But the giant lasers and long tunnels needed would be enormously expensive. Weiss and his colleagues went to the National Science Foundation for money. There were doubts, in part because other scientists recalled Weber's failed attempts decades earlier. But eventually, a panel of eminent scientists endorsed the project.

"They said, 'Hey this is a great idea. You should do it. It's risky, but it's exactly what the country needs,' " Weiss recalls.

http://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-...work-how-scientists-found-gravitational-waves
 
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Catching a wave is a tough problem. Gravitational waves bend space only a tiny, tiny amount — a small fraction of the diameter of a subatomic-particle.

Weiss and other researchers spent more than a decade just tinkering, trying to figure out how to do it. Eventually, they came up with a plan.

The idea was to build a giant laser and place it between two-high precision mirrors set in an L-shape. Bouncing light off the mirrors, each of which would be miles away, would provide a stunningly accurate measure of distance. On paper at least, it could detect the stretching and squishing of space by gravitational waves.

But the giant lasers and long tunnels needed would be enormously expensive. Weiss and his colleagues went to the National Science Foundation for money. There were doubts, in part because other scientists recalled Weber's failed attempts decades earlier. But eventually, a panel of eminent scientists endorsed the project.

"They said, 'Hey this is a great idea. You should do it. It's risky, but it's exactly what the country needs,' " Weiss recalls.

Einstein, A Hunch And Decades Of Work: How Scientists Found Gravitational Waves : The Two-Way : NPR
Ah, that's right I do remember seeing that one too. The other method I was thinking of was a big copper-aluminum sphere that was super-cooled to about 20 millikelvin (because if it's not super-cooled the ball itself will have quantum thermal vibrations of its own that would vastly drown out any quantum fluctuations from a gravitational wave).
 
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Feb 2011
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Ah, that's right I do remember seeing that one too. The other method I was thinking of was a big copper-aluminum sphere that was super-cooled to about 20 millikelvin (because if it's not super-cooled the ball itself will have quantum thermal vibrations of its own that would vastly drown out any quantum fluctuations from a gravitational wave).
Glad that is cleared up for ya.