Liberals and Slaveholders

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thenextbesthang

Ok.

Yet you belittle democracy.

This is the best way to secure those rights, so long as its established correctly.

Every other way relies on a benevolent ruler.
 
F

Feslin

Democracy is dangerous to the rights of the people.

As you said, public opinion can be tyrannical.
 
T

thenextbesthang

well so is everything. Unless you want to go back to a state of nature. I don't particularly feel like doing that.
 
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Feslin

Not really. Think about it, if the government is bound to a very very strict constitution, and are there ONLY to protect the rights of the people, their political beliefs don't matter.
 
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thenextbesthang

how are you to bound them to the constitution? Its just a piece of paper, as our illustrious president has said.
 
T

thenextbesthang

what do you think the 10th amendment is....how well do you think thats served your statement?
 
F

Feslin

To a constitution mind you; but I see your point.

However, it's the piece of paper that give the people their rights. It's really a contract between the citizens and their government.

Much more important than simply a 'piece of paper'.
 
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Technocratic_Utilitarian

I think someone here is using ambiguous terminology, and that is where the problem arises. By "democracy" does someone mean "Constitutional Republic." The United States isn't a Democracy in the sense many think.

It is a Federal Democratic Constitutional Republic. There is a difference between a Democracy and the U.S. Government.


I generally support the idea of a Federal Constitutional Republic. A well-written, thorough Constitution combined with checks and balances of independent branches of government, some direct citizen involvement, usually leads to acceptable results. The key is "how much involvement."

Necessarily, citizens need to feel involved, they need to have some way of having their interests heard, and they need some way to redress greviances against people in government who are violating key welfare interests.

An Independent Judiciary is key to an effective Democratic Const. Republic such as ours.

A well-educated, relatively informed and intelligent electorate, and better educated, intelligent representatives is also needed for increased functionality; sadly, that's something missing in America, which, as the Founding Fathers noted, would hurt America.
 
T

thenextbesthang

ok.
I don't see my right to life being given by the constitution. I see it given to me by armed forces that keep me safe.

ITs a contract, yes, but:
A) We haven't signed it, our predessors did.
B) We live in a great nation. People expect different things from the government.
 
F

Feslin

A well-written, thorough Constitution combined with checks and balances of independent branches of government, some direct citizen involvement, usually leads to acceptable results. The key is "how much involvement."
Exactly, in my ideal government the constitution would be the law to any who agree to it's terms (and minors).