Looks like Sears is done

Dec 2018
452
112
Florida
#12
Yea I guess. We had an article locally that said if we head into another recession, downtowns might be next. Boutique and specialty stores are a bit more expensive but fill a certain niche. Last week my son actually ordered a battery for his car online. Paid a stupid $40 hazmat fee. Could have gone down to the auto parts store and paid less. But "would have to talk, interact and all that." Geez.
I rarely purchase online. I don’t like dealing with shipping. Things will balance out for some stuff though. Online and shipping costs will go up accoring to supply and demand.
 
Mar 2012
51,000
33,650
New Hampshire
#13
I don't think the changes are as bad as some make it out to be. I know there were worries about the automobile and flying etc. Someone was once sure that going over 20 mph in an automobile would cause brain damage! I'm sure electricity had it's doomsayers too. And I am running into some darn good examples of the younger generation. I see some working their hearts out in dead end minimum wage food server jobs with college degree debt, but they still perform admirably. Every older generation criticizes the younger generation. Even Aristotle was quoted as such.
Agree except when the automobile and flying came to be, humans were still the necessary agent to make them work. Nowadays the jobs arent just replaced by another human, they are replaced with a computer or robot. So the concern I think is what happens to that single mom that needs to work mothers hours if her job is automated? It does make what we are facing now a bit different than the days of the auto replacing the horse. Tons of people were still needed.
 

boontito

Future Staff
Jan 2008
100,985
88,392
West Coast 4 Life
#14
Agree except when the automobile and flying came to be, humans were still the necessary agent to make them work. Nowadays the jobs arent just replaced by another human, they are replaced with a computer or robot. So the concern I think is what happens to that single mom that needs to work mothers hours if her job is automated? It does make what we are facing now a bit different than the days of the auto replacing the horse. Tons of people were still needed.
I don't think it's changed as much as you're saying though. There's always been automation, especially since the industrial revolution.

Coke bottles were originally filled by hand and have been filled by machines for decades now. Before there were coin operated soda machines dispensing the can of your choice you had to get the local soda jerk to make it up for you right at the counter. We even do self fillup in soda and convenience stores when it used to be the worker who did that for us.

And that's all just in the soda industry.
 
Mar 2012
51,000
33,650
New Hampshire
#15
I don't think it's changed as much as you're saying though. There's always been automation, especially since the industrial revolution.

Coke bottles were originally filled by hand and have been filled by machines for decades now. Before there were coin operated soda machines dispensing the can of your choice you had to get the local soda jerk to make it up for you right at the counter. We even do self fillup in soda and convenience stores when it used to be the worker who did that for us.

And that's all just in the soda industry.
True but back then we werent a service economy. Our biggest employers were IBM, GE, ATT etc. Today its Walmart. Our economic structure has changed.
 
Likes: Ian Jeffrey

boontito

Future Staff
Jan 2008
100,985
88,392
West Coast 4 Life
#16
True but back then we werent a service economy. Our biggest employers were IBM, GE, ATT etc. Today its Walmart. Our economic structure has changed.
Our economic structure always changes. The guy who used to fill your fountain pop behind the counter was providing a service. A service that you do yourself now in most places.

Human beings have an amazing ability to adapt to change and invent new industries and, even, economic structures.

There was a time when anybody could call themselves a doctor. We took that away from people. Those people ended up doing something else.

Not saying change isn't sometimes painful it's just not impossible.
 
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HayJenn

Moderator
Jul 2014
59,059
47,075
CA
#17
Dollar General grew during the recession. I actually will frequently buy name brand items and other basics there. They are almost always a convenient stop and cheap as well. I avoid Walmart when possible.
Actually, a ton of people still shop at Dollar General. They are expanding in a big way



Dollar General is growing at breakneck speed, and it shows no signs of slowing down.

The discount chain, known for being a bargain hunter's paradise, has quietly become one of the largest retailers in the United States in terms of store count. It has 15,227 stores across 44 states.

By comparison, Walmart has 5,352 stores in the US, CVS 9,800, Kroger 2,765, Target 1,850, and Home Depot more than 2,200.

In fact, Dollar General has grown so much that it has even eclipsed two of the most-stored brands in the sector: McDonald's and Starbucks, which have around 14,000 and 14,600 locations, respectively. It loses out only to Subway, which has around 25,800 US locations.

Dollar General has suddenly become one of the biggest retailers in the US by store count

Kind of seems like an indication to me that not everyone is benefitting from the current economy.
 
Likes: EnigmaO01
Feb 2014
98
60
Michigan
#20
Ditto. I hate the large parking lots of Walmart and driving to Walmart, which here is at least is a half hour away. Our Dollar General is only 2.5 miles away in town.

My brother worked at Walmart during the recession. Had nothing good to say about the way they treat their employees.
I absolutely HATE Walmart. I have anxiety attacks and road rage when I go there. Lol! I like going to Kmart instead, so this makes me sad. We do have Dollar General and Dollar Tree here, and I like those stores, it just doesn't carry everything we need.