Making America Great Again - Our Environment

May 2019
18
10
Los Alamos
#1
Tues 6-11-19 11:49 a.m.

Fathers tell their sons, "Take a risk." Mothers tell their daughters, "Do what's safe." It helps if children grow up with both of these views. It would help if would-be warriors visit the Veterans Administration and see former soldiers who are missing body parts (that is, eyes, limbs, etc.) or look at former pro-football players who did not get a college education and had their knees torn to pieces on football fields, or old men who look peculiar / talk peculiar when they take their dentures out. It would help if young housewives-to-be find a mentor at an early age and learn about successful women who took a risk (perhaps Women in Science, those who have gone into the nursing profession, the League of Women Voters, or those who perform countless volunteer task in our communities - to name a few).

This brings me in a round-about way to the issue of orphan wastes. An orphan waste is an unidentified liquid which has been discarded. It may be water, salt water, or 1,2 - ethyl methyl nasty stuff. Pull out your CRC Handbook, there are all kinds of inorganic and organic chemicals which can be your friends or your enemies.

The only way to identify what the composition is of an orphan waste is to analyze it. This can be expensive (perhaps $1000 per waste item). When orphan wastes are left behind in homes or industrial settings, it can create expensive environmental safety problems.

Chemicals are like fire - they can serve a useful purpose, but they may also cause great harm if handled improperly.

So what can you do to help. You can label the contents in what are called secondary containers (for example, a plastic bottle or glass jar). Let's say you poured some used anti-freeze from your auto into a glass jar. The liquid may look yellow, green, blue, etc. But what is it? If you know it is automobile anti-freeze, then write that on the label. However, there are different types of anti-freeze. Is it an ethylene glycol-based anti-freeze. Or is it a pet-safe propylene glycol anti-freeze. I have been known to take a bottle and put it on a copying machine so I can make a copy of the orginal container label and the tape the resulting paper label to containers.

I think that this is doing something great for mankind. It uses your head and your skill. If you choose, you can look up information on Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDSs) to learn more about a particular chemical, chemical formulation, etc.

Many years ago my brother had a friend who used to work on cars. One day he poured some 12 volt battery acid (diluted sulfuric acid solution) into a glass Coke bottle. At some point he got his bottle of battery acid mixed up with his Coke bottle. He was unpleasantly surprised when he drank some of the battery acid. He lived. However, did he learn anything form his experience? I do not know.

So consider the issues of risk and safety, and work on making smart choices.

Regards,

Moderatevoter451
 
May 2019
18
10
Los Alamos
#2
Tues 6-11-19 11:49 a.m.

Fathers tell their sons, "Take a risk." Mothers tell their daughters, "Do what's safe." It helps if children grow up with both of these views. It would help if would-be warriors visit the Veterans Administration and see former soldiers who are missing body parts (that is, eyes, limbs, etc.) or look at former pro-football players who did not get a college education and had their knees torn to pieces on football fields, or old men who look peculiar / talk peculiar when they take their dentures out. It would help if young housewives-to-be find a mentor at an early age and learn about successful women who took a risk (perhaps Women in Science, those who have gone into the nursing profession, the League of Women Voters, or those who perform countless volunteer task in our communities - to name a few).

This brings me in a round-about way to the issue of orphan wastes. An orphan waste is an unidentified liquid which has been discarded. It may be water, salt water, or 1,2 - ethyl methyl nasty stuff. Pull out your CRC Handbook, there are all kinds of inorganic and organic chemicals which can be your friends or your enemies.

The only way to identify what the composition is of an orphan waste is to analyze it. This can be expensive (perhaps $1000 per waste item). When orphan wastes are left behind in homes or industrial settings, it can create expensive environmental safety problems.

Chemicals are like fire - they can serve a useful purpose, but they may also cause great harm if handled improperly.

So what can you do to help. You can label the contents in what are called secondary containers (for example, a plastic bottle or glass jar). Let's say you poured some used anti-freeze from your auto into a glass jar. The liquid may look yellow, green, blue, etc. But what is it? If you know it is automobile anti-freeze, then write that on the label. However, there are different types of anti-freeze. Is it an ethylene glycol-based anti-freeze. Or is it a pet-safe propylene glycol anti-freeze. I have been known to take a bottle and put it on a copying machine so I can make a copy of the orginal container label and the tape the resulting paper label to containers.

I think that this is doing something great for mankind. It uses your head and your skill. If you choose, you can look up information on Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDSs) to learn more about a particular chemical, chemical formulation, etc.

Many years ago my brother had a friend who used to work on cars. One day he poured some 12 volt battery acid (diluted sulfuric acid solution) into a glass Coke bottle. At some point he got his bottle of battery acid mixed up with his Coke bottle. He was unpleasantly surprised when he drank some of the battery acid. He lived. However, did he learn anything form his experience? I do not know.

So consider the issues of risk and safety, and work on making smart choices.

Regards,

Moderatevoter451
Tues 6-11-19 12:22 p.m.

By the way, it also helps to label items which came out the kitchen, like "Granny's Homemade Tea." It might even be helpful to put a copy of Granny's tea recipe on the bottle too.

Regards,

Moderatevoter451
 
Jan 2007
37,249
8,481
#3
Where I live there are locations to drop off , used oil, antifreeze, tires, almost all of the usual nasty things to dispose of. Side of the road is not a land fill.
 

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