Making America Great Again - What Will Work

May 2019
18
10
Los Alamos
#1
Sun 6-9-19 5:54 p.m.

The following are some pointers on what might help make America Great Again:

1) Manufacture Products
2) Re-institute shop class and Junior Achievement in schools (wood shop, metal shop, etc.)
3) Limit the time spent on I-phones / cell phones
4) Learn how to do something constructive while watching television
5) Throw away the lottery tickets
6) Give up on getting something for nothing and make something out of nothing
7) Work to improve yourself
8) Look at people like the Europeans do - a professional janitor and a professional CEO are equal in my book if they are
competent in their jobs
9) Take a discarded item, study it, and write down 10 things it can be re-purposed into so that it has another life - then
make one of those things.
10) Quit trying to make things perfect
11) Do not be afraid to fail - be afraid if you have never tried.
12) Be more tolerant of people who have opinions which differ from your own
13) Balance risk against safety (Note: Work-free safety zones are useless)
14) Ask yourself if "smokestack America" is better or worse than importing everything from China or another foreign
country.
15) Take a look at abandoned industrial plants on the internet - this is our future if nothing changes.
16) Learn to conserve resources - as the population increases, resources will gradually be exhausted (water, good farm
land, timber, natural gas, metals, etc.)
17) Learn to do what is right (this means educating yourself, working hard, making decisions which make sense over 30
years.

Issue 1 - Manufacture Products - Once people quit manufacturing things for themselves they become slaves to those who do the manufacture products - Read about the Eloy and the Moorlocks in Jules Verne the time machine. The Moorlocks live underground, run machinery, and feed the Eloy. The Moorlocks also eat the Eloy. Keep in mind that babies were sold for meat in England during the 1520's. Banks now generate 40% of the Federal income. If people quite borrowing money, we are in big trouble. I have spent 30 years transitioning from consumer to recycler / repairer to manufacturer / inventor.

Issue 2 - Re-institute shop class and Junior Achievement in schools (wood shop, metal shop, etc.) - We chose some years ago to eliminate shop class in favor of computer class. Now most people (consumers) cannot repair or build anything.

Issue 3: Limit the time spent on I-phones / cell phones - The last time I checked, my cell phone did not create, build, or repair anything.

Issue 4: Learn how to do something constructive while watching television - I no longer watch television. I do watch old videos. I rebuild airtools while I watch the videos. If there is a good scene on the video, I will watch in for a few minutes. Mostly, the videos are background noise and serve a similar function to a radio.

Issue 5: Throw away the lottery tickets - You will accomplish much more by fixing things yourself around the house.

Issue 6: Give up on getting something for nothing and make something out of nothing - I have been straightening out bent and rusty nails since I was 6 years old. I have built a world with those nails. Need I say more? My Public Library has a used bookstore. It saddens me that everyone appears to be getting rid of their do-it-yourself books and their quilting books.

Issue 7: Work to improve yourself - It might help if you quit purchasing Toyotas and read the book about the Toyota Way instead. Don't be afraid to wade into a difficult problem and get your hands dirty.

Issue 8: Look at people like the Europeans do - a professional janitor and a professional CEO are equal in my book if they
are competent in their jobs. It might help if you read Studs Terkel's book "Working". I make it a point to thank workers for the work which they perform. They have my respect. Peter the Great learned form the craftsmen.

Issue 9: Take a discarded item, study it, and write down 10 things it can be re-purposed into so that it has another life -
then make one of those things. I just found out this weekend how to take a can opener, hold it at a 45 degree angle and cut the top out of a soda pop can, 24 of the cans can be placed in a cardboard beer flat or soda pop flat to make a nice parts (re-purpose item) bin.

Issue 10: Quit trying to make things perfect - Many inventions which are extremely useful are not perfect. I am amused that when someone bakes a cake and it comes out perfect. I would be more impressed if someone got an engineering degree while maintaining a B+ grade average.

Issue 11: Do not be afraid to fail - be afraid if you have never tried - I have been successful because I have been willing to fail and have kept trying. I fought with a worthless little machine some time ago. I was determined not to give up until it was repaired. When you go to a surgeon to have your body repaired, should you expect less?

Issue 12: Be more tolerant of people who have opinions which differ from your own - I read biographies. I learn from other people's experiences and mistakes.

Issue 13: Balance risk against safety (Note: Work-free safety zones are useless) - I think about hazard analysis as a check of a design effort. It helps to ask "what if something goes wrong" and put corrective measures in place before something goes wrong.

Issue 14: Ask yourself if "smokestack America" is better or worse than importing everything from China or another foreign
country? Personally, I like industrial plants. They provide jobs, self-respect / individual capability, a sense of community, products, and an industrial backbone in the event of war. I like to compete with the Chinese in the airtool market.

Issue 15: Take a look at abandoned industrial plants on the internet - this is our future if nothing changes. I do not like our throw-away society (industrial plants, consumer goods, workers, etc.). It may be better to throw way the society instead. We are back to the discussion about the Eloy and the Moorlocks again.

Issue 16: Learn to conserve resources - as the population increases, resources will gradually be exhausted (water, good
farm land, timber, natural gas, metals, etc.). Always save something for tomorrow, you never know what could go wrong. We are back to the discussion on hazard analysis and what if questions. What if I run out of money?

Issue 17: Learn to do what is right (this means educating yourself, working hard, making decisions which make sense over 30 years. The Swiss decided to built a railroad tunnel underneath a mountain. It was going to take 30 years. After 30 years, there was a railroad tunnel underneath the mountain. Think about what it took to build the Panama Canal.

Regards,

Moderatevoter451
 
May 2019
18
10
Los Alamos
#3
Sun 6-9-19 5:54 p.m.

The following are some pointers on what might help make America Great Again:

1) Manufacture Products
2) Re-institute shop class and Junior Achievement in schools (wood shop, metal shop, etc.)
3) Limit the time spent on I-phones / cell phones
4) Learn how to do something constructive while watching television
5) Throw away the lottery tickets
6) Give up on getting something for nothing and make something out of nothing
7) Work to improve yourself
8) Look at people like the Europeans do - a professional janitor and a professional CEO are equal in my book if they are
competent in their jobs
9) Take a discarded item, study it, and write down 10 things it can be re-purposed into so that it has another life - then
make one of those things.
10) Quit trying to make things perfect
11) Do not be afraid to fail - be afraid if you have never tried.
12) Be more tolerant of people who have opinions which differ from your own
13) Balance risk against safety (Note: Work-free safety zones are useless)
14) Ask yourself if "smokestack America" is better or worse than importing everything from China or another foreign
country.
15) Take a look at abandoned industrial plants on the internet - this is our future if nothing changes.
16) Learn to conserve resources - as the population increases, resources will gradually be exhausted (water, good farm
land, timber, natural gas, metals, etc.)
17) Learn to do what is right (this means educating yourself, working hard, making decisions which make sense over 30
years.

Issue 1 - Manufacture Products - Once people quit manufacturing things for themselves they become slaves to those who do the manufacture products - Read about the Eloy and the Moorlocks in Jules Verne the time machine. The Moorlocks live underground, run machinery, and feed the Eloy. The Moorlocks also eat the Eloy. Keep in mind that babies were sold for meat in England during the 1520's. Banks now generate 40% of the Federal income. If people quite borrowing money, we are in big trouble. I have spent 30 years transitioning from consumer to recycler / repairer to manufacturer / inventor.

Issue 2 - Re-institute shop class and Junior Achievement in schools (wood shop, metal shop, etc.) - We chose some years ago to eliminate shop class in favor of computer class. Now most people (consumers) cannot repair or build anything.

Issue 3: Limit the time spent on I-phones / cell phones - The last time I checked, my cell phone did not create, build, or repair anything.

Issue 4: Learn how to do something constructive while watching television - I no longer watch television. I do watch old videos. I rebuild airtools while I watch the videos. If there is a good scene on the video, I will watch in for a few minutes. Mostly, the videos are background noise and serve a similar function to a radio.

Issue 5: Throw away the lottery tickets - You will accomplish much more by fixing things yourself around the house.

Issue 6: Give up on getting something for nothing and make something out of nothing - I have been straightening out bent and rusty nails since I was 6 years old. I have built a world with those nails. Need I say more? My Public Library has a used bookstore. It saddens me that everyone appears to be getting rid of their do-it-yourself books and their quilting books.

Issue 7: Work to improve yourself - It might help if you quit purchasing Toyotas and read the book about the Toyota Way instead. Don't be afraid to wade into a difficult problem and get your hands dirty.

Issue 8: Look at people like the Europeans do - a professional janitor and a professional CEO are equal in my book if they
are competent in their jobs. It might help if you read Studs Terkel's book "Working". I make it a point to thank workers for the work which they perform. They have my respect. Peter the Great learned form the craftsmen.

Issue 9: Take a discarded item, study it, and write down 10 things it can be re-purposed into so that it has another life -
then make one of those things. I just found out this weekend how to take a can opener, hold it at a 45 degree angle and cut the top out of a soda pop can, 24 of the cans can be placed in a cardboard beer flat or soda pop flat to make a nice parts (re-purpose item) bin.

Issue 10: Quit trying to make things perfect - Many inventions which are extremely useful are not perfect. I am amused that when someone bakes a cake and it comes out perfect. I would be more impressed if someone got an engineering degree while maintaining a B+ grade average.

Issue 11: Do not be afraid to fail - be afraid if you have never tried - I have been successful because I have been willing to fail and have kept trying. I fought with a worthless little machine some time ago. I was determined not to give up until it was repaired. When you go to a surgeon to have your body repaired, should you expect less?

Issue 12: Be more tolerant of people who have opinions which differ from your own - I read biographies. I learn from other people's experiences and mistakes.

Issue 13: Balance risk against safety (Note: Work-free safety zones are useless) - I think about hazard analysis as a check of a design effort. It helps to ask "what if something goes wrong" and put corrective measures in place before something goes wrong.

Issue 14: Ask yourself if "smokestack America" is better or worse than importing everything from China or another foreign
country? Personally, I like industrial plants. They provide jobs, self-respect / individual capability, a sense of community, products, and an industrial backbone in the event of war. I like to compete with the Chinese in the airtool market.

Issue 15: Take a look at abandoned industrial plants on the internet - this is our future if nothing changes. I do not like our throw-away society (industrial plants, consumer goods, workers, etc.). It may be better to throw way the society instead. We are back to the discussion about the Eloy and the Moorlocks again.

Issue 16: Learn to conserve resources - as the population increases, resources will gradually be exhausted (water, good
farm land, timber, natural gas, metals, etc.). Always save something for tomorrow, you never know what could go wrong. We are back to the discussion on hazard analysis and what if questions. What if I run out of money?

Issue 17: Learn to do what is right (this means educating yourself, working hard, making decisions which make sense over 30 years. The Swiss decided to built a railroad tunnel underneath a mountain. It was going to take 30 years. After 30 years, there was a railroad tunnel underneath the mountain. Think about what it took to build the Panama Canal.

Regards,

Moderatevoter451
Mon 6-10-19 1:36 a.m.

Issue 18: Since when did suing for a living become acceptable? - Suing for a living has become like a game show / a form of entertainment / another type of lottery. You accidentally hit a drunk homeless person who is wandering around in the street with your automobile. An accident / injury lawyer realizes that every pedestrian is worth about $5 million and sues you the driver. The lawyer gets 60%. They called bootlegging a racket in the 1920's.

Issue 19: Making things more complex - Sometimes with wear and use, an airtool will leak air through the shutoff / throttling valve. It used to be that an o-ring had to be replaced. The repair was simple and an o-ring cost about 25 cents. The design of airtools has been modified so that it is difficult to make a simple shutoff / throttle valve repair. The proprietary seals are also relatively expensive now. And why? So that tool manufacturers can make more money on repairs or more money on replacement tools. (Note 1: If a tool runs continuously and a mechanic or auto body technician cannot repair the tool, they may just go ahead and purchase a new tool for $300. This is called progress.) (Note 2: I have been told that mechanics can no longer make a living unless they are working at two or three different jobs. So if your auto is not repaired properly, maybe it is because your mechanic is working so many hours that he/she doesn't get a decent nights sleep. Younger workers are not selecting auto body work as a career. Perhaps that is because auto shop classes were cut from school system curricula in favor of computer classes. Many auto body technicians have been switching jobs trying to find a little bit better pay scale. However, the industry is dominated by insurance company practices [designed to punish shops which do not deliver work at the lowest possible cost - this actually causes some shops to deliver repaired autos at lower prices than the parts and labor necessary to complete the work] and also by holding companies which buy up the capability to repair a certain make of automobile. So if you work on a BMW, Toyota, Accura, Honda, etc. you are going to have a tough time trying to better your paycheck.)

Issue 20: Everyone needs a sports stadium, but what is the impact on infrastructure (water / sewer / electrical / roads / sidewalks)? - I first ran into issues with sports stadiums in the Houston area during the early 1970's. Houston built the Astrodome. Pretty cool! However, the folks who performed repairs on the Houston sewer system desperately needed $10,000 to make repairs. The city fathers told sewer department personnel that all available monies had been spent on the Astrodome. Then the sewers proceeded to fall apart. The repairs ran into the millions. Well if Houston has a world-class sports stadium, then every other city also needs a sports stadium. So you can imagine what the impact was on infrastructure in cities all over America. Something similar occurred with the building of shopping malls. Now some of the shopping malls are empty. Other shopping malls are a great place for teenagers to hang out, but they are probably not spending much money in the stores.

Issue 21: Charitable donations - what percentage of money gets to the end user?

I can keep going with this until I hit 100 issues.

Regards,

Moderatevoter451
 
Oct 2018
1,474
1,166
WonderfulOregon
#5
Sun 6-9-19 5:54 p.m.

The following are some pointers on what might help make America Great Again:

1) Manufacture Products
2) Re-institute shop class and Junior Achievement in schools (wood shop, metal shop, etc.)
3) Limit the time spent on I-phones / cell phones
4) Learn how to do something constructive while watching television
5) Throw away the lottery tickets
6) Give up on getting something for nothing and make something out of nothing
7) Work to improve yourself
8) Look at people like the Europeans do - a professional janitor and a professional CEO are equal in my book if they are
competent in their jobs
9) Take a discarded item, study it, and write down 10 things it can be re-purposed into so that it has another life - then
make one of those things.
10) Quit trying to make things perfect
11) Do not be afraid to fail - be afraid if you have never tried.
12) Be more tolerant of people who have opinions which differ from your own
13) Balance risk against safety (Note: Work-free safety zones are useless)
14) Ask yourself if "smokestack America" is better or worse than importing everything from China or another foreign
country.
15) Take a look at abandoned industrial plants on the internet - this is our future if nothing changes.
16) Learn to conserve resources - as the population increases, resources will gradually be exhausted (water, good farm
land, timber, natural gas, metals, etc.)
17) Learn to do what is right (this means educating yourself, working hard, making decisions which make sense over 30
years.

Issue 1 - Manufacture Products - Once people quit manufacturing things for themselves they become slaves to those who do the manufacture products - Read about the Eloy and the Moorlocks in Jules Verne the time machine. The Moorlocks live underground, run machinery, and feed the Eloy. The Moorlocks also eat the Eloy. Keep in mind that babies were sold for meat in England during the 1520's. Banks now generate 40% of the Federal income. If people quite borrowing money, we are in big trouble. I have spent 30 years transitioning from consumer to recycler / repairer to manufacturer / inventor.

Issue 2 - Re-institute shop class and Junior Achievement in schools (wood shop, metal shop, etc.) - We chose some years ago to eliminate shop class in favor of computer class. Now most people (consumers) cannot repair or build anything.

Issue 3: Limit the time spent on I-phones / cell phones - The last time I checked, my cell phone did not create, build, or repair anything.

Issue 4: Learn how to do something constructive while watching television - I no longer watch television. I do watch old videos. I rebuild airtools while I watch the videos. If there is a good scene on the video, I will watch in for a few minutes. Mostly, the videos are background noise and serve a similar function to a radio.

Issue 5: Throw away the lottery tickets - You will accomplish much more by fixing things yourself around the house.

Issue 6: Give up on getting something for nothing and make something out of nothing - I have been straightening out bent and rusty nails since I was 6 years old. I have built a world with those nails. Need I say more? My Public Library has a used bookstore. It saddens me that everyone appears to be getting rid of their do-it-yourself books and their quilting books.

Issue 7: Work to improve yourself - It might help if you quit purchasing Toyotas and read the book about the Toyota Way instead. Don't be afraid to wade into a difficult problem and get your hands dirty.

Issue 8: Look at people like the Europeans do - a professional janitor and a professional CEO are equal in my book if they
are competent in their jobs. It might help if you read Studs Terkel's book "Working". I make it a point to thank workers for the work which they perform. They have my respect. Peter the Great learned form the craftsmen.

Issue 9: Take a discarded item, study it, and write down 10 things it can be re-purposed into so that it has another life -
then make one of those things. I just found out this weekend how to take a can opener, hold it at a 45 degree angle and cut the top out of a soda pop can, 24 of the cans can be placed in a cardboard beer flat or soda pop flat to make a nice parts (re-purpose item) bin.

Issue 10: Quit trying to make things perfect - Many inventions which are extremely useful are not perfect. I am amused that when someone bakes a cake and it comes out perfect. I would be more impressed if someone got an engineering degree while maintaining a B+ grade average.

Issue 11: Do not be afraid to fail - be afraid if you have never tried - I have been successful because I have been willing to fail and have kept trying. I fought with a worthless little machine some time ago. I was determined not to give up until it was repaired. When you go to a surgeon to have your body repaired, should you expect less?

Issue 12: Be more tolerant of people who have opinions which differ from your own - I read biographies. I learn from other people's experiences and mistakes.

Issue 13: Balance risk against safety (Note: Work-free safety zones are useless) - I think about hazard analysis as a check of a design effort. It helps to ask "what if something goes wrong" and put corrective measures in place before something goes wrong.

Issue 14: Ask yourself if "smokestack America" is better or worse than importing everything from China or another foreign
country? Personally, I like industrial plants. They provide jobs, self-respect / individual capability, a sense of community, products, and an industrial backbone in the event of war. I like to compete with the Chinese in the airtool market.

Issue 15: Take a look at abandoned industrial plants on the internet - this is our future if nothing changes. I do not like our throw-away society (industrial plants, consumer goods, workers, etc.). It may be better to throw way the society instead. We are back to the discussion about the Eloy and the Moorlocks again.

Issue 16: Learn to conserve resources - as the population increases, resources will gradually be exhausted (water, good
farm land, timber, natural gas, metals, etc.). Always save something for tomorrow, you never know what could go wrong. We are back to the discussion on hazard analysis and what if questions. What if I run out of money?

Issue 17: Learn to do what is right (this means educating yourself, working hard, making decisions which make sense over 30 years. The Swiss decided to built a railroad tunnel underneath a mountain. It was going to take 30 years. After 30 years, there was a railroad tunnel underneath the mountain. Think about what it took to build the Panama Canal.

Regards,

Moderatevoter451
We have thousands of unemployed from manufacturing. THe problem isn't getting the youth to learn The problem is. Why? Fix the corporate "supply side economic" that killed the industry. No wonder EACH state made the decision to discontinue "shop"
This is basically the propaganda of pulling up your boots. It's the top down kind of problem _not the bottom up.
 
Oct 2018
1,474
1,166
WonderfulOregon
#6
Sounds like what trump is accomplishing.
THINK AGAIN. HE HAS MANAGED TO INSPIRE MORE MCDONALDS TO OPEN. YOU ARE AWARE TH JOBS BEING FILLED ARE IN THE "SErvice industry? Like a maid ... janitor. There are SErvice jobs that no one seems to get ...is nothing to be proud about. We are a Nation of hamburger flippers until corporation rely on the American built as worth investing in

Kindle (both computers are broke...boo '' too much work to go back to fix)
 
Mar 2012
55,301
36,843
New Hampshire
#7
Heard a great quote recently that said "America went from being a country of labor to a country of capital." I think that describes us perfectly. We used to rely on the backs of labor and rewarded that, but over the last 30 years we sent those jobs overseas to cheap labor and prefer the urban sophisticate worker. Which is great but we cant have just that. Europe still rewards labor but we dont. We love our corporations.
 
Likes: jorae
Feb 2011
16,883
11,242
The formerly great golden state
#8
Mon 6-10-19 1:36 a.m.

Issue 18: Since when did suing for a living become acceptable? - Suing for a living has become like a game show / a form of entertainment / another type of lottery. You accidentally hit a drunk homeless person who is wandering around in the street with your automobile. An accident / injury lawyer realizes that every pedestrian is worth about $5 million and sues you the driver. The lawyer gets 60%. They called bootlegging a racket in the 1920's.

Issue 19: Making things more complex - Sometimes with wear and use, an airtool will leak air through the shutoff / throttling valve. It used to be that an o-ring had to be replaced. The repair was simple and an o-ring cost about 25 cents. The design of airtools has been modified so that it is difficult to make a simple shutoff / throttle valve repair. The proprietary seals are also relatively expensive now. And why? So that tool manufacturers can make more money on repairs or more money on replacement tools. (Note 1: If a tool runs continuously and a mechanic or auto body technician cannot repair the tool, they may just go ahead and purchase a new tool for $300. This is called progress.) (Note 2: I have been told that mechanics can no longer make a living unless they are working at two or three different jobs. So if your auto is not repaired properly, maybe it is because your mechanic is working so many hours that he/she doesn't get a decent nights sleep. Younger workers are not selecting auto body work as a career. Perhaps that is because auto shop classes were cut from school system curricula in favor of computer classes. Many auto body technicians have been switching jobs trying to find a little bit better pay scale. However, the industry is dominated by insurance company practices [designed to punish shops which do not deliver work at the lowest possible cost - this actually causes some shops to deliver repaired autos at lower prices than the parts and labor necessary to complete the work] and also by holding companies which buy up the capability to repair a certain make of automobile. So if you work on a BMW, Toyota, Accura, Honda, etc. you are going to have a tough time trying to better your paycheck.)

Issue 20: Everyone needs a sports stadium, but what is the impact on infrastructure (water / sewer / electrical / roads / sidewalks)? - I first ran into issues with sports stadiums in the Houston area during the early 1970's. Houston built the Astrodome. Pretty cool! However, the folks who performed repairs on the Houston sewer system desperately needed $10,000 to make repairs. The city fathers told sewer department personnel that all available monies had been spent on the Astrodome. Then the sewers proceeded to fall apart. The repairs ran into the millions. Well if Houston has a world-class sports stadium, then every other city also needs a sports stadium. So you can imagine what the impact was on infrastructure in cities all over America. Something similar occurred with the building of shopping malls. Now some of the shopping malls are empty. Other shopping malls are a great place for teenagers to hang out, but they are probably not spending much money in the stores.

Issue 21: Charitable donations - what percentage of money gets to the end user?
I can keep going with this until I hit 100 issues.

Regards,

Moderatevoter451
Please don't. It's not possible to discuss so many issues at once. It's better to take them one at a time.

Take #19: We have a throw away society. I'm not familiar with airtools per se, but can see exactly what you're talking about. The tool that once could be taken apart and fixed by the user now has to be replaced. Now, where is that item manufactured? If it's made in the USA, at least replacing it provides a job for someone, but it's still not the same as the jobs that people did back in the '50s when the USA was a manufacturing power. No, it's being in charge of the machines that do the actual manufacturing, the ones that provide one job, but replace 50. Oh, and those auto mechanics and other workers who have to work two jobs to make ends meet, are they unionized? Probably not, as the decline of unions has preceded the decline in real wages for working people. Shop classes? They went out the window when the No Child Left Behind act went into play and the focus became passing a difficult end of the year test geared to preparing students for college. When did college become the one and only goal for everyone? Oh, and the dropouts, the ones who never graduate from high school, what do they do? Once upon a time, they could work in the fields, but that work is mostly done by illegal labor now. Try to get someone who is not qualified for anything else to go pick fruit and see how far you get.

That's just one. No way can we discuss all 100 at once.
 
Mar 2012
55,301
36,843
New Hampshire
#9
Please don't. It's not possible to discuss so many issues at once. It's better to take them one at a time.

Take #19: We have a throw away society. I'm not familiar with airtools per se, but can see exactly what you're talking about. The tool that once could be taken apart and fixed by the user now has to be replaced. Now, where is that item manufactured? If it's made in the USA, at least replacing it provides a job for someone, but it's still not the same as the jobs that people did back in the '50s when the USA was a manufacturing power. No, it's being in charge of the machines that do the actual manufacturing, the ones that provide one job, but replace 50. Oh, and those auto mechanics and other workers who have to work two jobs to make ends meet, are they unionized? Probably not, as the decline of unions has preceded the decline in real wages for working people. Shop classes? They went out the window when the No Child Left Behind act went into play and the focus became passing a difficult end of the year test geared to preparing students for college. When did college become the one and only goal for everyone? Oh, and the dropouts, the ones who never graduate from high school, what do they do? Once upon a time, they could work in the fields, but that work is mostly done by illegal labor now. Try to get someone who is not qualified for anything else to go pick fruit and see how far you get.

That's just one. No way can we discuss all 100 at once.
Its only going to get worse from here. Now throw automation into the mix taking away unskilled labor completely. What then? Few have answers or want to talk about it. I keep hearing some say "we need them to all get to college" but thats not reality. All I see in another 20 years or so, is an even more angry populace angered they were automated out of work because they asked for a $15 min wage and nobody prepared them for the future. We could see some interesting elections then.
 
Feb 2011
16,883
11,242
The formerly great golden state
#10
Its only going to get worse from here. Now throw automation into the mix taking away unskilled labor completely. What then? Few have answers or want to talk about it. I keep hearing some say "we need them to all get to college" but thats not reality. All I see in another 20 years or so, is an even more angry populace angered they were automated out of work because they asked for a $15 min wage and nobody prepared them for the future. We could see some interesting elections then.

That's for sure. College grads are out of work in many cases, yet we still are trying to prepare everyone for college, which is becoming less and less affordable.

The welfare state is not a solution either. People need something to do, some job that needs doing. If all they get is bread and circuses, we'll soon go the way of the Romans. Humans are not cats, willing to sleep all day as long as someone is feeding them.

Here's a riddle for liberal arts majors: What's the difference between a liberal arts major and a large pizza?


A large pizza can feed a family of four.
 

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