Making America Great Again - What Will Work

Feb 2011
16,636
5,879
Boise, ID
#21
Issue 1 - Manufacture Products - Once people quit manufacturing things for themselves they become slaves to those who do the manufacture products
No they don't. Consumers are basically never "slaves" to producers. It can sometimes be the other way around, where producers are slaves to the consumers. What makes a slave a slave is they she or he is forced to produce for near-zero remuneration. You shouldn't use the term "slave" in false ways that render it meaningless.

Read about the Eloy and the Moorlocks in Jules Verne the time machine. The Moorlocks live underground, run machinery, and feed the Eloy. The Moorlocks also eat the Eloy. Keep in mind that babies were sold for meat in England during the 1520's.
WTF are you talking about?

Issue 6: Give up on getting something for nothing and make something out of nothing - I have been straightening out bent and rusty nails since I was 6 years old. I have built a world with those nails. Need I say more?
Yes, say more. Specifically, calculate your relative hourly rate for unbending nails. Divide the price per package of nails by its quantity to get the price per new nail. Then record how long it takes to unbend a nail on average (get a large enough sample size) to figure out how many nails per hour you can realistically unbend. Adjust this number by the time it takes you to find/collect/procure the bent nails, to get an accurate, adjusted time-per-unbent-nail figure. From there you should be able to figure out your effective hourly rate from unbending nails, to get a sense of how productive it is to be spending your time that way.

Typically, the only time it's worth unbending a nail is if you're just a few nails short and can save an entire trip to the hardware store by unbending a few. Otherwise, most people's productive capacities are way more than it being worth one's time to unbend nails (unless it's just something you enjoy doing for the heck of it).

Issue 9: Take a discarded item, study it, and write down 10 things it can be re-purposed into so that it has another life
Like the unbending of nails analysis, this is probably an extremely inefficient use of time, and is basically a hoarder's self-rationalization, to be honest. Hoarding is a mental disorder. Good decision making sometimes requires the ability to very quickly and almost automatically assess what's worth your time and what's not, to do away with what's not worth one's time and move on to focus on bigger goals. The reason things get discarded in the first place is because they are deemed not worth the time it takes to repurpose them. A person can utterly waste virtually infinite amounts of time trying to salvage things that have rock bottom zero value. Being thrifty requires efficiently evaluating what's worth it and what's not. Nails are not. Most garbage is not (hence the decision to put it in the garbage).

If one is extremely bored and has basically zero other income-producing opportunities, and gets a kick out of being creatively thrifty, great, more power to you and your hobby, but regressing to a scavenging way of life is not how the country is made great again.

Not trying to be mean, but something that could make America great again is if more people examine their own opinions and admit foolishness in some of the things they once thought clever.
 
Last edited:
Apr 2012
58,454
43,294
Englewood,Ohio
#22
Its only going to get worse from here. Now throw automation into the mix taking away unskilled labor completely. What then? Few have answers or want to talk about it. I keep hearing some say "we need them to all get to college" but thats not reality. All I see in another 20 years or so, is an even more angry populace angered they were automated out of work because they asked for a $15 min wage and nobody prepared them for the future. We could see some interesting elections then.
That had already taken place in Manifacturing. One new company had a Job Fair. Those who came in,said they were skilled, were told they were skilled at pushing buttons.

But there are still many jobs that require manual labor. Farmers can buy huge machines for many jobs,use IPad’s in the cab, but there is also manual labor needed for many jobs. People need to learn new skills, most are never coming back.

There is constant change in the work place.
 
Feb 2011
16,968
11,323
The formerly great golden state
#23
That had already taken place in Manifacturing. One new company had a Job Fair. Those who came in,said they were skilled, were told they were skilled at pushing buttons.

But there are still many jobs that require manual labor. Farmers can buy huge machines for many jobs,use IPad’s in the cab, but there is also manual labor needed for many jobs. People need to learn new skills, most are never coming back.

There is constant change in the work place.
Yes, there is, and constant need to re train. Acquiring new job skills can be difficult and expensive either for the employer or the employee. What employees need to bring to the job are the soft skills: Showing up on time every day and putting in a full day's work heads the list. All too many just won't do that, and, absent that, what employer is going to invest in training?

Maybe a WPA sort of program is in order if, for nothing else, to teach those basic job skills.
 
Apr 2012
58,454
43,294
Englewood,Ohio
#24
Yes, there is, and constant need to re train. Acquiring new job skills can be difficult and expensive either for the employer or the employee. What employees need to bring to the job are the soft skills: Showing up on time every day and putting in a full day's work heads the list. All too many just won't do that, and, absent that, what employer is going to invest in training?

Maybe a WPA sort of program is in order if, for nothing else, to teach those basic job skills.
Democrats have suggested Service programs but it should be more like the CCC rather than the WPA.

My Dad, a former Farmer worked one week on the WPA! He hated it.:) went to work for the Railroad.

I do agree on learning basic skills. My Grandson is doing just that this summer.:) Make him happy to go back to College.
 
Likes: bajisima
Mar 2012
55,502
36,985
New Hampshire
#25
Yes, there is, and constant need to re train. Acquiring new job skills can be difficult and expensive either for the employer or the employee. What employees need to bring to the job are the soft skills: Showing up on time every day and putting in a full day's work heads the list. All too many just won't do that, and, absent that, what employer is going to invest in training?

Maybe a WPA sort of program is in order if, for nothing else, to teach those basic job skills.
Just saw a piece on the news this morning that said most Americans can no longer move for work as they once did. They talked to one young girl who wanted to move out of her area for a job but cant because her mom lives with her and is dying. Another one is the only one who speaks English in the family and they rely on her for translating. Others owe too much on their current home. Its really a problem in areas where the factory closes down and these people cant go anywhere. So there is lots of people that might have those soft skills but cant accept work in other geographic areas due to other reasons. Lots of elderly moving back in with their kids now. So the "parents" now have their millennials and their grandparents sharing a home.
 
Jan 2014
17,209
4,750
California
#26
Tues 6-11-19 9:32 a.m.

I am a hands-on type of engineer. I think better when I have something in my hands. For example, I tore apart a 9 volt direct current battery recently. Inside of the outer metal wrapper, I found 6 each 1.5 volt direct current batteries. The 9 volt batteries have very interesting terminals which might be used again as a snap-type terminal or as a metal bushing. The 1.5 volt direct current batteries could be disassembled for cylindrical tubing stock. I will probably take both the outer metal wrapper and some of the tubing and measure their thickness to see what I can make them into using simple tools. The fiber stock used to hold the terminals has a potential use as fiber (insulated) washers.

Pardon me for saying this, but I see world of opportunity out there.

A can of tuna costs 89 cents at the grocery store. For years, I have been cutting out 3 or 4 shim washers from the tuna can lids. There are a variety of items which I no longer purchase at the hardware store because I can make them myself.

I have also been taking discarded pieces of 7/16-inch thick waferboard (plywood) scrap and building them up into 4 ft x 4 ft sheets. I make 2-inch wide joining strips, drill 1/16-inch diameter holes through the scrap pieces and plywood strips. Then I use discarded packing crate staples and wire to sew the pieces of wood together. I curl up the ends of the staples using a pair of needle nose pliers and pull the pieces of wood together. (Note: Why not use glue? Glue is not waterproof and costs money.) I have made some very nice packing crates. One proposed crate will become a home for the $80 Sears Craftsman snow blower I purchased at a garage sale recently. I have to straighten out the bent scroll and install a new shear pin, but that should be pretty simple. If it is not simple, I will use my noggin to develop a repair.

How do you think we got Apollo 13 back safely?

QED / End of Proof

Regards,

Moderatevoter451
Mr. Moderatevoter,

Whoo-whaa, if I had a nickel for every load of empty cans, scraps of lumber, old nails, and pieces for scrap that I have hauled to the dump after cleaning out the garages of some old guys that died.
 
Feb 2011
16,968
11,323
The formerly great golden state
#27
Just saw a piece on the news this morning that said most Americans can no longer move for work as they once did. They talked to one young girl who wanted to move out of her area for a job but cant because her mom lives with her and is dying. Another one is the only one who speaks English in the family and they rely on her for translating. Others owe too much on their current home. Its really a problem in areas where the factory closes down and these people cant go anywhere. So there is lots of people that might have those soft skills but cant accept work in other geographic areas due to other reasons. Lots of elderly moving back in with their kids now. So the "parents" now have their millennials and their grandparents sharing a home.

That can be a problem. Another one is the cost of housing where the jobs are. If you have to sell in an area where houses go for $200,000 and buy in an area where the same house goes for $750,000 that's a huge barrier.

I've often wondered just where people who wait tables and tend bar in tourist areas where houses start at a million live. They must have to share apartments and still have lengthy commutes.
 
Mar 2012
55,502
36,985
New Hampshire
#28
That can be a problem. Another one is the cost of housing where the jobs are. If you have to sell in an area where houses go for $200,000 and buy in an area where the same house goes for $750,000 that's a huge barrier.

I've often wondered just where people who wait tables and tend bar in tourist areas where houses start at a million live. They must have to share apartments and still have lengthy commutes.
Have seen where even teachers drive 2 hours one way just to work in Silicon Valley because they cant afford housing close by. Its surely a problem but one thats unlikely to be solved because these areas just have so many that make a ton of money these days. We have people driving in from Vermont to work in Boston and thats two states away.
 
Apr 2012
58,454
43,294
Englewood,Ohio
#29
Tues 6-11-19 9:32 a.m.

I am a hands-on type of engineer. I think better when I have something in my hands. For example, I tore apart a 9 volt direct current battery recently. Inside of the outer metal wrapper, I found 6 each 1.5 volt direct current batteries. The 9 volt batteries have very interesting terminals which might be used again as a snap-type terminal or as a metal bushing. The 1.5 volt direct current batteries could be disassembled for cylindrical tubing stock. I will probably take both the outer metal wrapper and some of the tubing and measure their thickness to see what I can make them into using simple tools. The fiber stock used to hold the terminals has a potential use as fiber (insulated) washers.

Pardon me for saying this, but I see world of opportunity out there.

A can of tuna costs 89 cents at the grocery store. For years, I have been cutting out 3 or 4 shim washers from the tuna can lids. There are a variety of items which I no longer purchase at the hardware store because I can make them myself.

I have also been taking discarded pieces of 7/16-inch thick waferboard (plywood) scrap and building them up into 4 ft x 4 ft sheets. I make 2-inch wide joining strips, drill 1/16-inch diameter holes through the scrap pieces and plywood strips. Then I use discarded packing crate staples and wire to sew the pieces of wood together. I curl up the ends of the staples using a pair of needle nose pliers and pull the pieces of wood together. (Note: Why not use glue? Glue is not waterproof and costs money.) I have made some very nice packing crates. One proposed crate will become a home for the $80 Sears Craftsman snow blower I purchased at a garage sale recently. I have to straighten out the bent scroll and install a new shear pin, but that should be pretty simple. If it is not simple, I will use my noggin to develop a repair.

How do you think we got Apollo 13 back safely?

QED / End of Proof

Regards,

Moderatevoter451
Is that you, Son?
 
Feb 2011
16,968
11,323
The formerly great golden state
#30
Have seen where even teachers drive 2 hours one way just to work in Silicon Valley because they cant afford housing close by. Its surely a problem but one thats unlikely to be solved because these areas just have so many that make a ton of money these days. We have people driving in from Vermont to work in Boston and thats two states away.
Lots of jobs can telecommute now, but not so teachers and service employees.
 

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