Manafort’s ‘mind-boggling’ 47-month sentence prompts debate over judicial system’s ‘blatant inequities’

HayJenn

Moderator
Jul 2014
65,120
53,470
CA
#1
. The sentencing inspired a flood of lawyers to dig through news clips and their own recent cases. What they found were dozens of examples of defendants who, in their view, were nowhere near as fortunate as Manafort. Scott Hechinger, a senior staff attorney at Brooklyn Defender Services, an organization that provides legal representation to defendants who cannot afford it, used one of his recent clients, who was just offered a 36-to-72-month sentence, as an example. The crime? Stealing $100 worth of quarters from a residential laundry room. Hechinger’s client may wind up doing more time than Manafort, a man who defrauded the Internal Revenue Service out of $6 million.

Other lawyers argued that Manafort’s sentence underscores “a broader problem: white collar crimes (e.g. fraud, money laundering) just aren’t taken seriously,” wrote Louis Laverone, an international financial crimes attorney. Laverone cited the case of one Turkish banker who was charged with participating in a multibillion-dollar scheme, violating U.S. economic sanctions. In that case, guidelines called for a possible 105-year sentence. The banker got 32 months.

Hechinger and other advocates of criminal justice reform who weighed in on Manafort’s sentence stressed that they were not calling for harsher overall punishment — simply a justice system that was more just.

“I’m not advocating here or anywhere for worse treatment for all,” he said. “Just wish my clients received same treatment as the privileged few.”

https://www.washingtonpost.com/dc-m...ggling-month-sentence/?utm_term=.d27045b51dfc

For sure this an issue that needs to be talked about and something is actually done to ensure that all people get fair treatment under the law. Not just "privilege" people.
 
Likes: Madeline
Nov 2015
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1,725
UK
#2
But what do you do, is jail a punishment? If he's done for tax fraud, the tax payer foots the bill to jail him. So it's cost you twice as much.

Is jail becoming defunct for certain criminals, should an alternative be sort.
 
Jun 2014
60,143
34,428
Cleveland, Ohio
#4
. The sentencing inspired a flood of lawyers to dig through news clips and their own recent cases. What they found were dozens of examples of defendants who, in their view, were nowhere near as fortunate as Manafort. Scott Hechinger, a senior staff attorney at Brooklyn Defender Services, an organization that provides legal representation to defendants who cannot afford it, used one of his recent clients, who was just offered a 36-to-72-month sentence, as an example. The crime? Stealing $100 worth of quarters from a residential laundry room. Hechinger’s client may wind up doing more time than Manafort, a man who defrauded the Internal Revenue Service out of $6 million.

Other lawyers argued that Manafort’s sentence underscores “a broader problem: white collar crimes (e.g. fraud, money laundering) just aren’t taken seriously,” wrote Louis Laverone, an international financial crimes attorney. Laverone cited the case of one Turkish banker who was charged with participating in a multibillion-dollar scheme, violating U.S. economic sanctions. In that case, guidelines called for a possible 105-year sentence. The banker got 32 months.

Hechinger and other advocates of criminal justice reform who weighed in on Manafort’s sentence stressed that they were not calling for harsher overall punishment — simply a justice system that was more just.

“I’m not advocating here or anywhere for worse treatment for all,” he said. “Just wish my clients received same treatment as the privileged few.”

https://www.washingtonpost.com/dc-m...ggling-month-sentence/?utm_term=.d27045b51dfc

For sure this an issue that needs to be talked about and something is actually done to ensure that all people get fair treatment under the law. Not just "privilege" people.
I'd consider it progress if all prisoners convicted of tax fraud got somewhat similar sentences. The gap between white collar and violent crime sentences bothers me too, but not as mych.
 
Jun 2014
60,143
34,428
Cleveland, Ohio
#5
But what do you do, is jail a punishment? If he's done for tax fraud, the tax payer foots the bill to jail him. So it's cost you twice as much.

Is jail becoming defunct for certain criminals, should an alternative be sort.
Well, the IRS should strip him of all his assets, or most of them. He should be disbarred and he cannot ever work as a registered D.C. lobbyist again.

Except, Trump will pardon him, IMO.
 
Dec 2014
15,347
5,145
The Milky Way
#9
Well, the IRS should strip him of all his assets, or most of them. He should be disbarred and he cannot ever work as a registered D.C. lobbyist again.

Except, Trump will pardon him, IMO.

Trump should commute to time served. No need to pardon, which would probably be a mistake.
 

HayJenn

Moderator
Jul 2014
65,120
53,470
CA
#10
I'd consider it progress if all prisoners convicted of tax fraud got somewhat similar sentences. The gap between white collar and violent crime sentences bothers me too, but not as mych.
This is based primarily on "white collar crime". A person is getting more jail time than Manafort for simply stealing 100 dollars worth of quarters.

Now compare that to Manafort who owes the taxpayers millions of dollars due to his "schemes".