Manafort’s Light Sentence in Washington Owes to How Mueller Charged Him

Sep 2011
24,998
17,442
aMEEErica
#22
I don't have a problem with the sentencing. It could've rightfully been a little longer. It wouldn't have surprised me if it had been a little less. It's in the ballpark.
Not of the sentencing guidelines..

And I guess she gave him a reduced sentence for farting in her face...

Thx :)
 

Chief

Former Staff
Nov 2009
32,222
19,506
SoCal
#23
Where is the derailment? Podesta was deeply involved in Manafort's business and was not registered as a lobbyist.
It's a silly question to ask, since no one here, including you, knows the details. Maybe it's still to come. Maybe Mueller doesn't think he can win a conviction. Maybe Podesta has been looked at and cleared. It could be anything, and none of us will actually know, no matter what the internet blogs say.
 

Chief

Former Staff
Nov 2009
32,222
19,506
SoCal
#25
7.5 years is about 2.5 years more than the average for this crime. but you folks want his head.
For the crimes he was charged with.

I wonder if he could get charged also with obstruction, when that unfolds later. (Since he was feeding the Trump lawyers team information while he supposedly was cooperating)
 
Jan 2019
4,760
1,788
southeast
#26
It's a silly question to ask, since no one here, including you, knows the details. Maybe it's still to come. Maybe Mueller doesn't think he can win a conviction. Maybe Podesta has been looked at and cleared. It could be anything, and none of us will actually know, no matter what the internet blogs say.
Could be...and that's why I brought it up.
 

boontito

Future Staff
Jan 2008
105,456
94,990
Most Insidious
#27
It's a silly question to ask, since no one here, including you, knows the details. Maybe it's still to come. Maybe Mueller doesn't think he can win a conviction. Maybe Podesta has been looked at and cleared. It could be anything, and none of us will actually know, no matter what the internet blogs say.
There are a lot of pretend FBI agents on this site. You'd be surprised what they pretend to know.
 
Likes: Blues63
Dec 2015
15,987
11,458
SoCal
#28
Facts make the difference. And why did Mueller yet again violate DOJ rules and practices?


...

In my column previewing today’s sentencing, I predicted that Manafort’s total sentence between the two cases would be closer to 20 years. I was wrong because I made a basic mistake: I focused myopically on the federal sentencing guidelines calculation in the plea agreement that Manafort signed with the special counsel when he pled guilty in Washington. I forgot that, in order to induce Manafort to plead guilty, the special counsel’s office sweetened the pot by capping his statutory exposure at ten years’ imprisonment.

Because the crimes Manafort admitted conspiring to commit are serious felonies (e.g., money laundering and witness tampering), his guidelines were very high, calling for a term of between 210 and 262 months (18 to 22 years) in prison. But prosecutors rendered the guidelines largely irrelevant by tucking the 20-year felonies into a pair of counts charged under a federal conspiracy provision that carries a maximum five-year sentence.

As I’ll come to, this violated Justice Department charging practices. For today’s purposes, though, the significant thing is that, in any situation where the sentence called for by the sentencing guidelines is greater than the maximum sentence permitted by the statutes of conviction, the statutes control. Therefore, even though the top guidelines-range sentence would have been 262 months, Judge Jackson was restricted to no more than 120 months.

She ended up imposing, in effect, 43 months, added on to the 47-month sentence imposed by Judge Ellis. Given the caterwauling that followed Ellis’s decision last week, there will no doubt be complaints that Jackson let Manafort off too easy. But if you feel that way, then Mueller shoulders much of the blame.

I have complained before about the special counsel’s flouting of Justice Department charging policies. Manafort’s two-count plea deal in the District of Columbia is a good example.

...



Paul Manafort's Sentancing — Robert Mueller Bent Rules, Hence the Light Sentence in D.C. | National Review
Seven years plus, and Manafort hasn't yet dealt with the state charges.
 
Jul 2011
58,195
11,429
NYC/Москва
#29
For the crimes he was charged with.

I wonder if he could get charged also with obstruction, when that unfolds later. (Since he was feeding the Trump lawyers team information while he supposedly was cooperating)



Seems racking up the time for this guy is starting to look vindictive. What exactly was his crimes?