Measles Killing Tens of Thousands and, that so far this year.

Sep 2007
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Measles is staging a devastating comeback that is killing thousands of children around the globe, the World Health Organisation warned yesterday.

Plummeting vaccination rates have led to an ‘alarming upsurge in measles cases in all regions’, including the UK, experts said.

There were 364,808 cases of measles reported to the WHO in the first six months of this year – triple the amount in 2018 and the highest level since 2006.

Several countries are currently battling deadly outbreaks, including the Democratic Republic of the Congo, where 4,000 people have died of measles already this year.
Yesterday Dr Kate O’Brien, director of the WHO’s department of immunisation, said ‘critical gaps’ in coverage are causing ‘widespread loss of life and disability’.

Speaking at a press conference in Geneva, Dr O’Brien said the UK was an example of a high-income country where falling vaccine coverage is particularly concerning.

She said: ‘There are countries that have recently lost their measles-free status, including the Czech Republic and the UK.

‘There has been an upsurge in measles in every region of the world, both in outbreaks, the total number of cases and number of deaths.

‘The fundamental root cause of that in every country is a failure of children to be adequately vaccinated and receive both doses of the measles vaccine.’



Common complications of measles include:
Some older adults may need to be revaccinated. You can ask your HCP to check your immunization titer to see if you are protected. And it would also be a good idea to get this years flu shot.
 
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Sep 2007
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That is happening in other countries. Not the USA.
You need another information sourse besides Alex Jones.
Did you see where CtC called you a hippy dippy alien?


Today, CDC is reporting 971 cases of measles in the United States thus far in 2019. This is the greatest number of cases reported in the U.S. since 1994, when 963 cases were reported for the entire year.


CDC continues to work with affected state and local health departments to get ongoing outbreaks under control.


“Measles is preventable and the way to end this outbreak is to ensure that all children and adults who can get vaccinated, do get vaccinated. Again, I want to reassure parents that vaccines are safe, they do not cause autism. The greater danger is the disease the vaccination prevents,” said CDC Director Dr. Robert Redfield, M.D. “Your decision to vaccinate will protect your family’s health and
our community’s well-being. CDC will continue working with public health responders across our nation to bring this outbreak to an end.”


Outbreaks in New York City and Rockland County, New York have continued for nearly 8 months. If these outbreaks continue through summer and fall, the United States may lose its measles elimination status. That loss would be a huge blow for the nation and erase the hard work done by all levels of public health. The measles elimination goal, first announced in 1966 and accomplished in 2000, was a monumental task. Before widespread use of the measles vaccine, an estimated 3 to 4 million people got measles each year in the United States, along with an estimated 400 to 500 deaths and 48,000 hospitalizations.
 
Mar 2019
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There are about 330 million people in the USA.

971 cases of measles. Cases not deaths.

So I was correct, this is happening outside of the USA
 
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May 2012
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Actually it is the vaccination that is lowering the natural immune systems of humans so when the disease mutates just a little bit the body can't fight it off. After vaccination your body relies on that to fight the disease creating an endless cycle of having to continuously create more vaccines for every iteration of the disease. While vaccinations can combat the disease and save lives it ultimately costs more lives in the long run.

It's a give and take situation here. On one side some argue that we have the ability now to produce vaccines quick enough to combat the different forms while others argue that it's best to let a disease run its course so people can naturally develop immunity to it and all its modifications. Personally I wouldn't want to be one of the outliers so I would take the vaccine.
 

raj

Oct 2018
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Actually it is the vaccination that is lowering the natural immune systems of humans so when the disease mutates just a little bit the body can't fight it off. After vaccination your body relies on that to fight the disease creating an endless cycle of having to continuously create more vaccines for every iteration of the disease. While vaccinations can combat the disease and save lives it ultimately costs more lives in the long run.

It's a give and take situation here. On one side some argue that we have the ability now to produce vaccines quick enough to combat the different forms while others argue that it's best to let a disease run its course so people can naturally develop immunity to it and all its modifications. Personally I wouldn't want to be one of the outliers so I would take the vaccine.

The only "natural immunity" to measles is surviving it after infection.
 
May 2012
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The only "natural immunity" to measles is surviving it after infection.
Yes but that trait is genetically passed down to children.

This is the issue. Save a lot of lives by vaccinating and ultimately forcing the body to rely on them or take the deaths from an outbreak and allow the body to develop natural immunity to it. In the first scenario you ultimately will lose more lives because once a disease like measles mutates the old vaccination no longer works meaning that people without access to the new treatment may die. This mainly affects poor nations as we are seeing.

The second part is to allow the disease to run it's course throughout the world, accept the death toll but realize that from now on a vaccine is not required any longer. Of course this depends on the outbreak and the severity of it. The first one is an immediate fix while the second may take generations. I am not arguing a side here I am just outlining the debate.

Also remember that a disease is not the same as a virus. The measles are a virus while things like Ebola are a disease which there is no preventive measures for.
 
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