Missing 911 pages. Saudi involvement in 911

Nov 2013
25,303
21,497
None of your business
#2

And this president is petitioning to have those pages released within the next two months, there is no secret as to the Bush family ties to the House of Saud, Bandar was a "bro" to the bush boys,

And even the Saudis want them released as they state they can defend their position, but dealing with "blank pages" leaves them open to speculative criticism,

I have no doubt in my mind that the Saudi's were perfectly happy with the enormous amount of hatred of the West, because it kept the heat off of them for their own economic and social injustices.

To them, the non-royal position of Bin Laden was an irritant; but then again, he based himself in Afghanistan, built roads and bridges, (like Mussolini) and then installed his own brand of hierarchy in that country.

A vacuum was left when the Soviets retreated, Charlie Wilson of Texas begged Reagan for a 1 million aid package for education, Reagan said it "wouldn't poll well" with the American people. That was a stupid move.

We learned our lesson post WWI; that's what led to the Marshall Plan post WWII, same thing in Afghanistan. It's just geography of course, the story remains the same.

In Pakistan in 2007, 58% of the men between the ages of 18 and 34 were unemployed; no gainful employment. That is the field where the dragon's teeth are sown for this kind of radicalism.

Poverty is the mother of crime, but the House of Saud has managed to protect themselves from the disasters they have created. Even Egypt and Jordan knew enough to create camps in the Jeddah Desert
for the Palestinians. Without those camps the attacks on Israel would be ten times worse than they are now.


Who do they all hate most of all? The Persians, the Iranians,,, that's why this foreign policy approach we have taken balances out the level of power in that region. Of course the Iranians have to play ball in order to do it, but make no mistake; Arabs do not like Persians.

That is centuries old

Regards
Pace
 
Likes: 4 people
Jan 2016
56,138
52,725
Colorado
#5
This is the usual distraction that Americans continue to fall for.
Gee. Why don't you tell us who was REALLY behind the 9/11 attacks?

Since you seem to be the local authority on wild-eyed conspiracy theories, I am sure we are all waiting with bated breath to hear your 'theory'.
 
Likes: 3 people
Nov 2013
25,303
21,497
None of your business
#6
This is the usual distraction that Americans continue to fall for.
Why is it a distraction? I read the 9/11 report, it was very enlightening, I also read Bob Graham's book, along with Richard Clarke's and Michael Schoen's.

There is a lot to be discussed about 9/11, we won't see the clear picture in our lifetime.

Regards
Pace
 
Likes: 2 people
Jan 2016
56,138
52,725
Colorado
#7
And this president is petitioning to have those pages released within the next two months, there is no secret as to the Bush family ties to the House of Saud, Bandar was a "bro" to the bush boys,

And even the Saudis want them released as they state they can defend their position, but dealing with "blank pages" leaves them open to speculative criticism,

I have no doubt in my mind that the Saudi's were perfectly happy with the enormous amount of hatred of the West, because it kept the heat off of them for their own economic and social injustices.

To them, the non-royal position of Bin Laden was an irritant; but then again, he based himself in Afghanistan, built roads and bridges, (like Mussolini) and then installed his own brand of hierarchy in that country.

A vacuum was left when the Soviets retreated, Charlie Wilson of Texas begged Reagan for a 1 million aid package for education, Reagan said it "wouldn't poll well" with the American people. That was a stupid move.

We learned our lesson post WWI; that's what led to the Marshall Plan post WWII, same thing in Afghanistan. It's just geography of course, the story remains the same.

In Pakistan in 2007, 58% of the men between the ages of 18 and 34 were unemployed; no gainful employment. That is the field where the dragon's teeth are sown for this kind of radicalism.

Poverty is the mother of crime, but the House of Saud has managed to protect themselves from the disasters they have created. Even Egypt and Jordan knew enough to create camps in the Jeddah Desert
for the Palestinians. Without those camps the attacks on Israel would be ten times worse than they are now.


Who do they all hate most of all? The Persians, the Iranians,,, that's why this foreign policy approach we have taken balances out the level of power in that region. Of course the Iranians have to play ball in order to do it, but make no mistake; Arabs do not like Persians.

That is centuries old

Regards
Pace
Nice post, Pace. Well thought out. I just have one quibble. Rebuilding Europe after WWII, with the Marshall Plan, was indeed very wise on our part. Probably the best 'geopolitical investment' America has ever made. But rebuilding Europe was relatively easy, because Europe had ALREADY been industrialized. Afghanistan has NEVER been an industrialized country. For most countries, going through the process of industrialization for the first time is exceptionally traumatic. We Americans mostly don't realize this, because the process was NOT very traumatic for America. Unlike Europe, we had no large class of peasantry that needed to be 'liquidated' for industrialization to proceed. Turning Afghanistan into some semblance of a stable country is, really, a MUCH more difficult task than rebuilding Europe (or Japan). Here again, Americans mostly do not realize this. They do not 'understand' why the Afghanis have not 'taken' to modernity with gusto, and with a proper degree of gratitude for their 'benefactors', we Americans.

What America has learned in the last 15 years, or at least what we SHOULD have learned, is that nation-building in countries that are still dominated by tribalism is a fool's mission, and is MOST unlikely to succeed.

Thanks for listening.
 
Likes: 4 people
Nov 2013
25,303
21,497
None of your business
#8
Nice post, Pace. Well thought out. I just have one quibble. Rebuilding Europe after WWII, with the Marshall Plan, was indeed very wise on our part. Probably the best 'geopolitical investment' America has ever made. But rebuilding Europe was relatively easy, because Europe had ALREADY been industrialized. Afghanistan has NEVER been an industrialized country. For most countries, going through the process of industrialization for the first time is exceptionally traumatic. We Americans mostly don't realize this, because the process was NOT very traumatic for America. Unlike Europe, we had no large class of peasantry that needed to be 'liquidated' for industrialization to proceed. Turning Afghanistan into some semblance of a stable country is, really, a MUCH more difficult task than rebuilding Europe (or Japan). Here again, Americans mostly do not realize this. They do not 'understand' why the Afghanis have not 'taken' to modernity with gusto, and with a proper degree of gratitude for their 'benefactors', we Americans.

What America has learned in the last 15 years, or at least what we SHOULD have learned, is that nation-building in countries that are still dominated by tribalism is a fool's mission, and is MOST unlikely to succeed.

Thanks for listening.
We had a lot of planning back then, we used it on our own non-industrialized areas in the US, the TVA as an example, that was the beginning of industrialization in rural areas.

We also had Operation Paperclip post WWII; we took more German scientists than any other country in order to keep them out of the hands of the Soviets. Werner Von Braun was the grand-daddy of the V-1, he was instrumental in developing the Mercury rocket program in the US.

We had foresight then, instead of polls, Reagan dropped that ball, Clinton tried the exchange student path, but those Taliban scholars at Yale were disruptive and abusive, the clash of civilizations was clear on the college campuses in the US.

We COULD have filled the vacuum, we did not; and that's the real fool's errand. I agree with Charlie Wilson, money SHOULD have been invested there to keep the progress going. The sudden leap from the sixth century to present day was not going to happen, but we left the vacuum, we fought a war by proxy and ended up paying for it.

Read Schoen's book on this "Imperial Hubris" he published anonymously and later claimed authorship. Schoen is ex-intelligence, very much a Middle Eastern Scholar, understands the culture a helluva lot better than many of us. It would have been to our benefit, and tell me, how much did we spend on bombs, troops, contractors, etc., in pursuing Bin Laden???

When the Berlin Wall came down, American companies were sending teams in droves to entice Russian engineers to join; I went myself to pursue talent in Optical Engineering.

We brought back a lot of engineers, only to find how deplorable some of their development was.

But One million dollars in Afghanistan. Seems a small price to pay now doesn't it?

Regards
Pace

Regards
Pace
 
Likes: 2 people
Nov 2015
3,320
1,498
Cyberia
#9
Why is it a distraction? I read the 9/11 report, it was very enlightening, I also read Bob Graham's book, along with Richard Clarke's and Michael Schoen's.

There is a lot to be discussed about 9/11, we won't see the clear picture in our lifetime.
The 911 report is a complete fabrication by the government along the lines of the Warren commission. The government intentionally leaks misinformation as a distraction because they know Americans are attracted to shiny objects.