Mitch McConnell: Gravedigger of Democracy

May 2012
64,412
12,209
By the wall
#31
There are a variety of things I would “like” to see in connection with you, but none of those have anything to do with more silly posts from you, that you can be sure of.

And yes, in it’s overwhelming majority, an information source which is peer reviewed permanently by thousands and thousands, totaling millions of people, actually is a very valid, and probably most reliable source of information out there.
I don’t question that you trolls have for years tried to put opinion into articles, instead of information, yet again, in it’s vast majority, this gets corrected with more efficiency and speed than any newspaper can put out an occasional correction statement.

That does not avoid some pity troll wars happening with back and forth changes and re-changes at times (which yet again, is fully documented in ach and every article’s change history), but within the Wikipedia space. Such intentional DISinformation, is as rare as mermaids are.

And the article about banana republics does not seem to be a usual suspect for an article to be a source of a pity dispute... and then, along came spooky.
So that must be why no college will accept Wiki as a source when writing a paper huh?

I gave the accepted definition of a banana republic and my opponent brought up an article by Wiki to try to disprove the standard definition.

A very high profile Wikipedia blunder falsely reported the “death” of Sen. Edward Kennedy after he actually did suffer a seizure during the post-inaugural luncheon for Barack Obama in January 2009. The Washington Post reports that Kennedy’s Wikipedia entry was edited at 2:59p.m. ET “to say that he had died” by someone who registered on the site under the name “Gfdjklsdgiojksdkf.”
 
Jan 2016
39,596
35,398
Colorado
#33
YES we are. Libs always talk about democracy and ignore that we are a Representative Constitutional Republic.
Sigh. We are a constitutional federal democratic republic. There is no contradiction between being BOTH a democracy AND a republic. Madison well understood that there were different KINDS of republics. He did NOT want America to be an oligarchic republic, like the medieval Republic of Venice.
 

Ian Jeffrey

Council Hall
Mar 2013
69,836
37,511
Vulcan, down the street from Darth Vader
#34
YES we are. Libs always talk about democracy and ignore that we are a Representative Constitutional Republic.
Untrue. We are a constitutional representative democratic republic. If you leave out the "democratic" part, you imply an undemocratic system, meaning we are dictatorial, aristocratic, oligarchic, and other possible denials of power to the people. Remember, the people of the United States established the Constitution ... says so right there on the label.
 
Nov 2013
9,636
8,864
NY
#35
So that must be why no college will accept Wiki as a source when writing a paper huh?

I gave the accepted definition of a banana republic and my opponent brought up an article by Wiki to try to disprove the standard definition.
Capitol Briefing - Kennedy, Byrd the Latest Victims of Wikipedia Errors

That anecdotal blunder lived in Wikipedia for about 5 minutes. 5 minutes. You’re really struggling and fishing for straws here.


According to the "Revision History," which Wikipedia provides on every page, the initial error was edited in by a user with the catchy name, "Gfdjklsdgiojksdkf." Within about five minutes, other Wikipedia editors had caught the errors and fixed them. As "Rickyrab" put it: "we dunno if he's dead, ok?" Gfdjklsdgiojksdkf was warned by editors not to make any more "disruptive edits"; apparently he had also inserted "oscenities" into the entry of soccer star Mia Hamm.
 
Dec 2014
13,693
4,330
The Milky Way
#36
No one refers to America as the democratic republic. It has been and is referred to as The Republic.

As James Madison wrote in Federalist No. 10, "Hence it is that such democracies have ever been spectacles of turbulence and contention; have ever been found incompatible with personal security or the rights of property; and have in general been as short in their lives as they have been violent in their deaths."
 

HayJenn

Moderator
Jul 2014
58,187
46,038
CA
#37
And back to the actual topic


From the link

Alongside the erosion of an independent judiciary as a check on executive power, other hallmarks of illiberal democracy are the neutralization of a free press and the steady diminution of basic human rights. On these issues, often described as the guardrails of democracy against authoritarian encroachment, the Trump administration either has won or seems poised to win significant gains for illiberalism. Upon his appointment as chancellor, Hitler immediately created a new Ministry of People’s Enlightenment and Propaganda under Joseph Goebbels, who remained one of his closest political advisers.

Seems pretty clear that this administration shows more and more of an authoritarian bent every day.

Opinion | Trump’s authoritarian musings are getting normalized, part 973

Think Trump is an authoritarian? Look at his actions, not his words | Corey Robin

  1. Systematic efforts to intimidate the media: Check
There’s little doubt that Trump and his associates have repeatedly tried to intimidate mainstream media organizations, whether through tweets deriding the supposedly “failingNew York Times, the repeated references to the “Amazon Washington Post,” or White House chief strategist and former Breitbart head Stephen Bannon’s referring to media organizations as “the opposition party.” Trump and Fox News also falsely accused the Times of thwarting efforts to kill or capture top Islamic State leaders, and the White House has arbitrarily excluded reporters of some organizations from press pools, press conferences, and other events. The obvious message: Play ball with us a bit more or expect to be marginalized. And that’s just a small sample of Trump’s war on the press


  1. Building an official pro-Trump media network: Partial check.
Back in November, I speculated that Trump might “use the presidency to bolster media that offer him consistent support” or even try to create a government-funded media agency to disseminate pro-Trump propaganda. There’s little doubt Trump has tried to favor outlets that embrace him, which is why the White House gave press credentials to the right-wing blog Gateway Pundit and has given the reliably wacky and pro-Trump Breitbart privileged access. And as one might expect, the Trump administration has backed the expansion plans of the conservative Sinclair Broadcast Group. Apart from the White House press office itself (which has been a train wreck from Day One), there’s no sign that the president intends to build a publicly funded pro-Trump media organization. But with Fox News and Sinclair and the various alt-right websites in his corner, he may not need one.


  1. Stacking the Supreme Court:
As I warned six months ago, Trump has already had one chance to fill a Supreme Court seat and he could easily have several more. We don’t yet know what sort of justice Neil Gorsuch will turn out to be or whom Trump might appoint down the road, but it’s a safe bet they won’t be progressives. But the real issue is how Gorsuch or any other appointees would vote on key constitutional questions involving the power of the executive branch. I’m not terribly concerned at the moment, but turning the judiciary into a tame tool is right out of the aspiring autocrats’ playbook, and the issue bears watching as relevant cases begin to work their way through the courts.


Top 10 Signs of Creeping Authoritarianism, Revisited
 
May 2012
64,412
12,209
By the wall
#39
And back to the actual topic


From the link

Alongside the erosion of an independent judiciary as a check on executive power, other hallmarks of illiberal democracy are the neutralization of a free press and the steady diminution of basic human rights. On these issues, often described as the guardrails of democracy against authoritarian encroachment, the Trump administration either has won or seems poised to win significant gains for illiberalism. Upon his appointment as chancellor, Hitler immediately created a new Ministry of People’s Enlightenment and Propaganda under Joseph Goebbels, who remained one of his closest political advisers.

Seems pretty clear that this administration shows more and more of an authoritarian bent every day.

Opinion | Trump’s authoritarian musings are getting normalized, part 973

Think Trump is an authoritarian? Look at his actions, not his words | Corey Robin

  1. Systematic efforts to intimidate the media: Check
There’s little doubt that Trump and his associates have repeatedly tried to intimidate mainstream media organizations, whether through tweets deriding the supposedly “failingNew York Times, the repeated references to the “Amazon Washington Post,” or White House chief strategist and former Breitbart head Stephen Bannon’s referring to media organizations as “the opposition party.” Trump and Fox News also falsely accused the Times of thwarting efforts to kill or capture top Islamic State leaders, and the White House has arbitrarily excluded reporters of some organizations from press pools, press conferences, and other events. The obvious message: Play ball with us a bit more or expect to be marginalized. And that’s just a small sample of Trump’s war on the press


  1. Building an official pro-Trump media network: Partial check.
Back in November, I speculated that Trump might “use the presidency to bolster media that offer him consistent support” or even try to create a government-funded media agency to disseminate pro-Trump propaganda. There’s little doubt Trump has tried to favor outlets that embrace him, which is why the White House gave press credentials to the right-wing blog Gateway Pundit and has given the reliably wacky and pro-Trump Breitbart privileged access. And as one might expect, the Trump administration has backed the expansion plans of the conservative Sinclair Broadcast Group. Apart from the White House press office itself (which has been a train wreck from Day One), there’s no sign that the president intends to build a publicly funded pro-Trump media organization. But with Fox News and Sinclair and the various alt-right websites in his corner, he may not need one.


  1. Stacking the Supreme Court:
As I warned six months ago, Trump has already had one chance to fill a Supreme Court seat and he could easily have several more. We don’t yet know what sort of justice Neil Gorsuch will turn out to be or whom Trump might appoint down the road, but it’s a safe bet they won’t be progressives. But the real issue is how Gorsuch or any other appointees would vote on key constitutional questions involving the power of the executive branch. I’m not terribly concerned at the moment, but turning the judiciary into a tame tool is right out of the aspiring autocrats’ playbook, and the issue bears watching as relevant cases begin to work their way through the courts.


Top 10 Signs of Creeping Authoritarianism, Revisited
So because Trump nominated conservatives to the Court he is authoritarian?

I'm curious, did this idiot author have the same complaint when presidents nominated liberals to the Court?

I'm guessing he was fine with that.

What a joke.
 

Ian Jeffrey

Council Hall
Mar 2013
69,836
37,511
Vulcan, down the street from Darth Vader
#40
No one refers to America as the democratic republic. It has been and is referred to as The Republic.
Substance over form. It does not matter what it looks like or what it is called; it matters what it is. And the U.S. is, among other things, a democratic system whereby ultimate power resides in the people in general.
 

Similar Discussions