More "people's marshals" in Crimea

The Man

Former Staff
Jul 2011
42,238
28,418
Toronto
#1
The so-called “Ministry of Internal Affairs” of the Crimea registered three new people’s squads, which allegedly would protect public order on the peninsula.

According to the press service of the “department” reported that squads Zubr (“Bison”), Poryadok (“Order”), and Tsentr (“Center”) received certificates of registration of the public association in the register of people’s teams and law-enforcement public associations.

The first two organizations represent the Nizhnegorsky District of Crimea, and the third – the Krasnogvardeisky District.

The leaders of the people’s squads were handed over the certificates by the “Deputy Head of the department for the organization of the protection of public order by the Ministry of Internal Affairs for the Crimea” Roman Kosmovsky.
New "people's marshals" appeared in Crimea - QHA media

Forgive the derisive tone, it is a Ukrainian propaganda site lol

But, yeah, Crimea has so-called "People's Militias".

Originally, these were groups of masked local men, who helped Russian troops occupy and secure the Peninsula in 2014

Some later went to fight in Donbass as well. They are fanatics, hate Ukraine and the West, just like Ukraine's own Azov neo-Nazis, only on the other side.

Most of them, after 2014, did not want to return to a regular, peaceful civilian life, and, instead, they were issued a new uniform and became a paramilitary organization, mostly, for now, focused on "law and order"



They patrol the streets of Crimean communities, in the larger cities - usually alongside regular police

but, especially out in the small towns in the countryside, they often go around on their own too.

Help provide security at public events, etc


It's not without controversy, the militias have been accused of mistreatment and even brutalities towards civilians, like this man, who had his head smashed in a fight with PM patrolmen

They claimed he was drunk and attacked them first, of course lol

Opponents of the Russia-installed Governor of Crimea Sergey Aksyonov often call them "Aksyonov's Stormtroopers" and such, which is what they are, in many ways

They have, since 2014, engaged in plenty of violent intimidation of pro-Ukrainian activists and any other dissidents and opponents of new Russian authorities in Crimea; including alleged abductions, torture, and murders: Russia must probe deaths and abductions in Crimea: rights group | Reuters

They are close to the Russian Orthodox Church also, here, uniformed militiamen stand honor guard at the opening ceremony of a new cathedral in Crimea

They have also been accused, by the Ukrainian Orthodox Church loyal to Kiev, of acting as muscle for Russian priests, backing them as they stormed pro-Ukraine churches in Crimea to take over those buildings and expel the Ukrainian priests (Ukrainian nationalists have done same to pro-Russian churches in Ukraine, to be fair)

Training school kids in military skills


They actually now have their own youth wing too


Family of a militiaman killed in action in Donbass, who are receiving financial assistance from the militia organization


They have serious financial backing themselves. I have read that the Crimean regional government under Aksyonov sets aside around 400 million roubles (around $5,950,000) a year for these militias.

They have full combat gear and weapons too and train in drills to support regular Russian forces, if Ukraine is ever dumb enough to attack Crimea


And, if that article is correct and truthful, which I bet it is, they are continuing to expand too, recruit new people and form new units... Crazy...
 

ARMCX1

Former Staff
Jun 2013
15,162
9,934
SoCal
#2
^^ holy shit ^^

Is Russia more nationalistic now or back in the days of the USSR? And is corruption more or less than in the Soviet era.
 
Likes: The Man

The Man

Former Staff
Jul 2011
42,238
28,418
Toronto
#3
^^ holy shit ^^

Is Russia more nationalistic now or back in the days of the USSR? And is corruption more or less than in the Soviet era.
I would say it is more nationalist now. From what I see, anyway, online and in conversation with own relatives and friends back there. In USSR, for example, hatred for the West came from the top, from the Communist Party, through state propaganda and such. It was fairly strong in the military, due to indoctrination. But regular people listened to illegally obtained American and other Western music records (most of which was banned lol), tuned their radios to catch BBC and Voice of America, etc. And dreamt of democracy and prosperity...

Now, however, while there still, don't take me wrong, are people when believe in these things, many of them, millions of them, but they are still only a small minority now. Majority of regular people now dislike the West, especially America. Blame America for the sanctions, etc. Some blame US but more Europe for things like homosexuality, which they see as a decadent liberal fad that comes from there, from Europe (which they refer to as "Gayropa", no joke lmao) and is alien to Russian society and culture :D

Many, on the other hand, believe in China... They think China is their great ally and friend... Fools, naive people who don't see that Xi pursues own interests, just like Putin...

As for corruption, it happened back then too, but it was much more modest then. Nobody, even the Commie Party bigwigs, had huge, million and billion dollar accounts in off shore banks. Or mansions in Miami. Or their kids studying in British boarding schools and universities. That was simply impossible, back then. The worst inequality back then was that there were special elite grocery stores for Party bosses and Red Army and KGB generals, where they could get various delicacies (like black caviar) that average people could only dream of.

Laughable, of course, compared to the elites today...
 

ARMCX1

Former Staff
Jun 2013
15,162
9,934
SoCal
#4
Poor Russia. The high five with MBS was like Kruschev banging his shoe. Only worse. Congratulating MBS for joining the club.

When would you say the oligarchs choked the developing political system post USSR; and why did Putin rise? Divestiture of exUSSR state owned property was in full swing in 1994. Yeltsin named Putin on New Year's Eve 1999 going to Y2K/2000.

I think Putin wasn't consolidated until maybe 8-10 years ago. There's no way except to remove Putin short of an act of violence or his death. Ultimately, I think Russia's headed for another civil war.
 
Likes: The Man

The Man

Former Staff
Jul 2011
42,238
28,418
Toronto
#5
Poor Russia. The high five with MBS was like Kruschev banging his shoe. Only worse. Congratulating MBS for joining the club.

When would you say the oligarchs choked the developing political system post USSR; and why did Putin rise? Divestiture of exUSSR state owned property was in full swing in 1994. Yeltsin named Putin on New Year's Eve 1999 going to Y2K/2000.

I think Putin wasn't consolidated until maybe 8-10 years ago. There's no way except to remove Putin short of an act of violence or his death. Ultimately, I think Russia's headed for another civil war.
The oligarchs ruled Russia in the 90s, the most powerful was Boris Berezovsky, second from right below

And then there were, from left to right, Aleksandr Smolensky, Mikhail Khodorkovsky, Vladimir Gusinsky. Among others.

They owned all the natural resources, the factories, the media, etc.

Berezovsky was at least the number two figure in Russia back then, he would often sit with Yeltsin at important meetings and advise him on policy of interest to the oligarchs


But they were, it turns out, not nearly as smart as they seemed, nor as invincible.

They failed to see a threat in Putin. Thought he would be just another puppet President. But that's not why he was there. He was there to restore the power of the "siloviki", the generals, the brute force people. And, backed by the security agencies, he steamrolled and destroyed many of the 90s oligarchs. Khodorkovsky and Gusinsky both lost most of their assets and spent each a decade of their lives in prison camps, both now live in exile abroad, Guskinsky in Israel, Khodorkovsky - in Europe. Berezovsky himself had to flee to Britain, where eventually he was found hanged at his mansion there in suspicious circumstances...

Smolensky is still a billionaire, I believe, because he saw, in time, where the wind was blowing, and betrayed the others, turned against them, and swore loyalty to Putin and his new system.

But, he is a marginal figure now, among Putin's new oligarchs, many of them Putin's fellow KGB vets, like head of Rosneft Igor Sechin

or guys who knew him personally since childhood, like the construction magnates Rotenberg brothers, who are building that bridge to Crimea, among other things


The oligarchs now work FOR Putin, not he for them. That is what he changed... And plenty of nationalists love him for that.

But, the corruption remains. As long as you are a friend to the Kremlin, you are free to steal and plunder and shake people down... :(
 
Jul 2013
48,421
51,170
Nashville, TN
#6
That could easily happen right here in the US. Many Americans favor an authoritarian oligarchy form of government and would accept a "Trump for Life" Presidency.
 
Likes: The Man

The Man

Former Staff
Jul 2011
42,238
28,418
Toronto
#7
That could easily happen right here in the US. Many Americans favor an authoritarian oligarchy form of government and would accept a "Trump for Life" Presidency.
Your Constitution is much stronger, and your courts more independent :)
 

The Man

Former Staff
Jul 2011
42,238
28,418
Toronto
#9
"Your Constitution is much stronger, and your courts more independent" so far anyway.
I don't know... I mean, US has very different political tradition than Russia.

Russia has always had autocracy and totalitarianism. From the Varyag/Viking warlord era; to the Mongol and Tatar Gold Horde rule; to the Romanov Dynasty Tsars and Emperors and Empresses; to the Soviets; to Yeltsin, who sent tanks to shoot at his parliament for trying to impeach him; to, finally, now, Putin. They've always lived that way. They don't know anything else, literally.

While the US is all about "liberty" and such. Your Constitution is sacred, to most Americans, from what I've observed. US was even born out of a desire of its people at the time to be free of colonial domination by Britain. You fought a civil war over freedom for slaves and such. You had the whole huge civil rights movement in the 60s.

No, I don't see a dictatorship ever emerging in the US, no way. :)
 
Last edited: