Muslim truck drivers refuse to deliver beer, win $240,000 lawsuit

Nov 2008
65,252
5,183
Washington state
An Illinois jury awarded $240,000 in damages and back pay to two former truck drivers who claimed religious discrimination when they were fired in 2009 after refusing to make beer deliveries.



A jury was convened to determine damages after US District Court Judge James E. Shadid ruled in favor of Mahad Abass Mohamed and Abdkiarim Hassan Bulshale when Star Transport admitted liability in March. The men, both of whom are Somali-American Muslims, wererepresented by the federal Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC).
Under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, employers must make accommodations for workers' religious beliefs unless doing so would impose "undue hardship" on the business.

The jury delivered its verdict in 45 minutes, on Oct. 20. However, the case appears to have picked up national attention when Fox News' Megyn Kelly invited the channel's legal analyst Judge Andrew Napolitano on air Monday, where the two criticized the government-appointed agency for cherry picking cases to serve a political agenda.
"It’s unfortunate when the government interferes in a private dispute over religious views and takes sides, and chooses one religion over another," Judge Napolitano said, responding to Ms. Kelly's accusation that the government had not provided Christians who object to workplace demands with the same protections as the Muslim truck drivers. Muslim truck drivers refuse to deliver beer, win $240,000 lawsuit
Interesting a Muslim refuses to deliver beer for religious reasons and they win a 1/4 million dollar lawsuit, but a bakery refuses to bake a cake for religious reasons and they get a bill for a $135K. Does the law favor Muslim over Christians? Looks like it.
 
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Jan 2007
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An Illinois jury awarded $240,000 in damages and back pay to two former truck drivers who claimed religious discrimination when they were fired in 2009 after refusing to make beer deliveries.



A jury was convened to determine damages after US District Court Judge James E. Shadid ruled in favor of Mahad Abass Mohamed and Abdkiarim Hassan Bulshale when Star Transport admitted liability in March. The men, both of whom are Somali-American Muslims, wererepresented by the federal Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC).
Under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, employers must make accommodations for workers' religious beliefs unless doing so would impose "undue hardship" on the business.

The jury delivered its verdict in 45 minutes, on Oct. 20. However, the case appears to have picked up national attention when Fox News' Megyn Kelly invited the channel's legal analyst Judge Andrew Napolitano on air Monday, where the two criticized the government-appointed agency for cherry picking cases to serve a political agenda.
"It’s unfortunate when the government interferes in a private dispute over religious views and takes sides, and chooses one religion over another," Judge Napolitano said, responding to Ms. Kelly's accusation that the government had not provided Christians who object to workplace demands with the same protections as the Muslim truck drivers. Muslim truck drivers refuse to deliver beer, win $240,000 lawsuit
Interesting a Muslim refuses to deliver beer for religious reasons and they win a 1/4 million dollar lawsuit, but a bakery refuses to bake a cake for religious reasons and they get a bill for a $135K. Does the law favor Muslim over Christians? Looks like it.
Diversity is our greatest strength....see how they enrich our culture.
 

webrockk

Former Staff
Nov 2009
30,474
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on the river
"Social Justice" is open-ended and completely arbitrary, and overrides the 14th Amendment's Equal Protections Clause.
 
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Jun 2014
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Cleveland, Ohio
For the last time, about, the bakery was sued by customers under a state law prohibiting discrimination based on sexual orientation. That case has nothing to do with any employer's duty to accommodate any employee's religious beliefs.
 
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HayJenn

Former Staff
Jul 2014
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One can always hope that this thread does not get 10 pages of responses of the same thing over and over and over and over again.
 
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Feb 2011
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Next it will be delivering hogs to market or some such inane thing.
 
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Nov 2008
65,252
5,183
Washington state
For the last time, about, the bakery was sued by customers under a state law prohibiting discrimination based on sexual orientation. That case has nothing to do with any employer's duty to accommodate any employee's religious beliefs.
What about Kim Davis? She does not deserve accommodations because she is Christian? If a Muslim had refused to issue marriage licenses the Liberal social justice crowd would have screamed about equality
 
Nov 2008
65,252
5,183
Washington state
For the last time, about, the bakery was sued by customers under a state law prohibiting discrimination based on sexual orientation. That case has nothing to do with any employer's duty to accommodate any employee's religious beliefs.
The Muslims were discriminating for not delivering beer to customers because it was against their beliefs.