Mysterious radio signals from deep space detected

Tedminator

Former Staff
Jun 2010
26,123
18,079
South Florida
#61
I don't think you read post #39, John. Here is the link again:

Radio wave - Wikipedia

And, FROM that link: Radio waves are a type of electromagnetic radiation with wavelengths in the electromagnetic spectrum longer than infrared light. Radio waves have frequencies as high as 300 gigahertz (GHz) to as low as 30 hertz (Hz).[1] At 300 GHz, the corresponding wavelength is 1 mm, and at 30 Hz is 10,000 km. Like all other electromagnetic waves, radio waves travel at the speed of light.

What are you arguing with there, John?

Here let me prove it:

A 1 hertz radio signal has a wave length of 983,571,056 ft.
A 1 megahertz radio signal has a wave length of 984 ft.
Shortwave EM and Longwave EM are received at different intervals, if observed side by side.

However when you express that slight over 1.5 billion light years - its far from a negligible number - it's a very great number. And without all the facts about the radiowave (was it 1 hertz or 1 megahertz) it's impossible to nail that number down. As I already said.

But I still wanted to try.

What you are expressing is very general terms about speeds of light and electromagnetic radiation. They do not account for the fact that space is not actually an absolute vacuum and any medium/debris the signal may have interfaced with on it's journey. And over 1.5 billion light years it's not outside of the norm to point that out.

Which I did.
:think: what are you two arguing about? How fast a radio wave travels? Radio waves travel at light speed, kiss yeah?
 
Likes: BigLeRoy

johnflesh

Former Staff
Feb 2007
23,525
16,119
Colorado
#62
John, I'm just saying you're WRONG. That's all. And that you quite evidently don't understand the physics. Shrug.
I've showed my work and it proves my point. As an exercise, I'll do it again.

If you look at the number 0.0000000001 - it looks like an negligible amount, yes?
Let's call that the difference in speed between a 1 hertz wave and a 1 mega hertz wave - for the sake of argument.

Seem like nothing yeah?

Now multiple that by 1.5billion.

Not so nothing anymore, is it?

That's all I was saying and you argued against that.

I think I'm done with this. It's getting petty and immature.
 

johnflesh

Former Staff
Feb 2007
23,525
16,119
Colorado
#63
:think: what are you two arguing about? How fast a radio wave travels? Radio waves travel at light speed, kiss yeah?
I'm trying to explore an interesting point, the other guy is just being usual rude.

I can understand if someone doesn't think it's interesting as I do, but that's their problem.
 
Jan 2016
43,830
39,497
Colorado
#64
I've showed my work and it proves my point. As an exercise, I'll do it again.

If you look at the number 0.0000000001 - it looks like an negligible amount, yes?
Let's call that the difference in speed between a 1 hertz wave and a 1 mega hertz wave - for the sake of argument.

Seem like nothing yeah?

Now multiple that by 1.5billion.

Not so nothing anymore, is it?

That's all I was saying and you argued against that.

I think I'm done with this. It's getting petty and immature.
Well, all I can say is, if you think you've proven that the speed of light is NOT a constant, please alert all the physicists in the world. They will certainly want to hear the news.....
 
Jan 2016
43,830
39,497
Colorado
#65
:think: what are you two arguing about? How fast a radio wave travels? Radio waves travel at light speed, kiss yeah?
That is certainly the conventional understanding of virtually all the physicists in the world, yes. Our poster here seems to have other ideas, though.
 

johnflesh

Former Staff
Feb 2007
23,525
16,119
Colorado
#66
Well, all I can say is, if you think you've proven that the speed of light is NOT a constant, please alert all the physicists in the world. They will certainly want to hear the news.....
That's not what I said at all. See, you aren't even being honest.

What's next, name calling?

You got nothing.
 
Jan 2016
43,830
39,497
Colorado
#68
That's not what I said at all. See, you aren't even being honest.

What's next, name calling?

You got nothing.
Sigh. If the speed of light is a constant, and if radio waves travel at the speed of light (and they do), then it would take EXACTLY 1.5 billion years for radio waves to travel to Earth from a source 1.5 billion light years distant, and no, you don't need any complicated equations to figure that out.
 

Tedminator

Former Staff
Jun 2010
26,123
18,079
South Florida
#69
I'm trying to explore an interesting point, the other guy is just being usual rude.

I can understand if someone doesn't think it's interesting as I do, but that's their problem.
So whats the variance? Lets say base line of 100 light years.
 

johnflesh

Former Staff
Feb 2007
23,525
16,119
Colorado
#70
So whats the variance? Lets say base line of 100 light years.
From my post on page 6:


A 1 hertz radio signal has a wave length of 983,571,056 ft.
A 1 megahertz radio signal has a wave length of 984 ft.
Shortwave EM and Longwave EM are received at different intervals, if observed side by side.

However when you express that slight over 1.5 billion light years - its far from a negligible number - it's a very great number. And without all the facts about the radiowave (was it 1 hertz or 1 megahertz) it's impossible to nail that number down. As I already said.

That's all I was saying. And yet I was told that I was saying something else, that I didn't understand basics, that I this, I that, I this, waaaaaah waaaaah waaaaah.

That's where we are now. I know I'm right, but I didn't really need to work for it. It's already proven by science.

But EVIDENTLY by me pointing that out - I somehow don't know that light speed is a constant...

Whatever.