Mysterious radio signals from deep space detected

Nov 2013
10,562
10,043
NY
#71
From my post on page 6:


A 1 hertz radio signal has a wave length of 983,571,056 ft.
A 1 megahertz radio signal has a wave length of 984 ft.
Shortwave EM and Longwave EM are received at different intervals, if observed side by side.

However when you express that slight over 1.5 billion light years - its far from a negligible number - it's a very great number. And without all the facts about the radiowave (was it 1 hertz or 1 megahertz) it's impossible to nail that number down. As I already said.

That's all I was saying. And yet I was told that I was saying something else, that I didn't understand basics, that I this, I that, I this, waaaaaah waaaaah waaaaah.

That's where we are now. I know I'm right, but I didn't really need to work for it. It's already proven by science.

But EVIDENTLY by me pointing that out - I somehow don't know that light speed is a constant...

Whatever.
A radio wave travels with the speed of light, no matter what frequency. You're wrong.

To travel the distance of 1 light year, a 1 Hz radio wave needs 1 year.
To travel the distance of 1 light year, a 1 GHz radio wave needs 1 year.

Those are the facts. Ultraviolet light travels at the same speed as infrared light.

If an electromagnetic wave is theoretically slowed down by a medium (non-perfect vacuum), that slowdown will affect visible light , invisible light, gamma rays and radio waves , just the same, so that all such waves travel through that medium, at the exact same speed, yet again, even if slightly below the speed of light.
 
Likes: BigLeRoy
Oct 2014
31,152
5,511
C-A-N-A-D-A-Eh
#73
I just assumed you kept repeating yourself with the same old links in an attempt to be rude and try to make me feel and look stupid. As you've done quite a bit already.
He really does do that... unfortunately, this time he was correct.

The speed a wave travels has no relation to the frequency.
 
Jan 2019
306
261
Midwest
#74
Is ET coming??

Astronomers have revealed details of mysterious signals emanating from a distant galaxy, picked up by a telescope in Canada. The precise nature and origin of the blasts of radio waves is unknown.

Among the 13 fast radio bursts, known as FRBs, was a very unusual repeating signal, coming from the same source about 1.5 billion light years away. "Knowing that there is another suggests that there could be more out there," said Ingrid Stairs, an astrophysicist from the University of British Columbia (UBC). "And with more repeaters and more sources available for study, we may be able to understand these cosmic puzzles - where they're from and what causes them."

The CHIME observatory, located in British Columbia's Okanagan Valley, consists of four 100-metre-long, semi-cylindrical antennas, which scan the entire northern sky each day. There are a number of theories about what could be causing them.

They include a neutron star with a very strong magnetic field that is spinning very rapidly, two neutron stars merging together, and, among a minority of observers, some form of alien spaceship.

Mysterious radio signals from deep space

I love reading about the possibilities of life on other planets. This is cool. Hope they are smart. :)
 
Likes: bajisima
Jan 2016
51,655
47,882
Colorado
#77
I love reading about the possibilities of life on other planets. This is cool. Hope they are smart. :)
You may enjoy reading about this, then. Barnard's Star is a VERY nearby star, much smaller than our Sun. It is, in fact, the second closest star to our Sun, after the Alpha Centauri triple-star system. It is about 6 light years away, just a hop, skip, and a jump away in galactic terms. A few years ago, we discovered that it has a Super-Earth planet orbiting it. The surface of the planet is very cold. But read on:

Barnard's Star Planet May Not Be Too Cold for Life After All
 
Aug 2013
2,082
2,432
North Georgia
#78
Believe the OP quoted a time frame of 1.5 billion "light" years away. Even so, I'm going to drink up my stock of beer--just in case!
 
Jan 2016
51,655
47,882
Colorado
#79
Haven't watched it yet, but it's on my list (after I watch The Last Jedi).
There is a scene in the movie Solo which depicts the first meeting between Han Solo as a young man and Chewbacca the Wookie. Very funny stuff. The Last Jedi is really a much more serious movie----probably the most 'serious' movie in the entire Star Wars pantheon. Solo is a lot more 'campy' and fun. But you gotta see BOTH of them!
 
Jan 2016
51,655
47,882
Colorado
#80
Believe the OP quoted a time frame of 1.5 billion "light" years away. Even so, I'm going to drink up my stock of beer--just in case!
Heh, reminds me of an old astrophysics joke, about the first guy to figure out that our Sun has about five billion more years worth of fuel to burn before it turns into a red giant and burns the Earth to a crisp.

When he informed a colleague of this discovery, the colleague said, "Wait, did you say five billion years?"

"Yes, that's correct," the first astrophysicist said. "Five billion years."

"Whew!" responded the colleague. "For a moment there, I thought you had said five million years!!"