NASA: Antarctic Sea Ice Reaches New Record Maximum

Lunchboxxy

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Not really. Changes in wind patterns and ocean circulation have caused extant sea ice in antarctica to grow in some locations. Globally sea ice is still way down. And the ice shelves in Antarctica are melting at an extremely fast pace, and those are the ones whose melting leads to sea level rise. Melting ice shelves lead to more freshwater on the sea surface that freezes, increasing extant sea ice.

Sea ice surrounding Antarctica reached a new record high extent this year, covering more of the southern oceans than it has since scientists began a long-term satellite record to map sea ice extent in the late 1970s. The upward trend in the Antarctic, however, is only about a third of the magnitude of the rapid loss of sea ice in the Arctic Ocean.
“The planet as a whole is doing what was expected in terms of warming. Sea ice as a whole is decreasing as expected, but just like with global warming, not every location with sea ice will have a downward trend in ice extent,” Parkinson said.
That suggests that a low-pressure system centered in the Amundsen Sea could be intensifying or becoming more frequent in the area, she said – changing the wind patterns and circulating warm air over the peninsula, while sweeping cold air from the Antarctic continent over the Ross Sea. This, and other wind and lower atmospheric pattern changes, could be influenced by the ozone hole higher up in the atmosphere – a possibility that has received scientific attention in the past several years, Parkinson said.

“The winds really play a big role,” Meier said. They whip around the continent, constantly pushing the thin ice. And if they change direction or get stronger in a more northward direction, he said, they push the ice further and grow the extent. When researchers measure ice extent, they look for areas of ocean where at least 15 percent is covered by sea ice.
Melting ice on the edges of the Antarctic continent could be leading to more fresh, just-above-freezing water, which makes refreezing into sea ice easier, Parkinson said. Or changes in water circulation patterns, bringing colder waters up to the surface around the landmass, could help grow more ice.
Oh, and your article is from 2014. Not exactly current.
 
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So, if it didn't happen last month it isn't relevant? Climate change sure happens fast in your Cult's world, huh?
 

Lunchboxxy

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So, if it didn't happen last month it isn't relevant? Climate change sure happens fast in your Cult's world, huh?
You really love to make shit up. I guess that's what you have to do when the facts aren't on your side.

I never said it wasn't relevent. I said it wasn't current. As in the "current events" section. Which I pointed out only after explaining the whole Antarctic sea ice thing in detail. From your own link.
 
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Not really. Changes in wind patterns and ocean circulation have caused extant sea ice in antarctica to grow in some locations. Globally sea ice is still way down. And the ice shelves in Antarctica are melting at an extremely fast pace, and those are the ones whose melting leads to sea level rise. Melting ice shelves lead to more freshwater on the sea surface that freezes, increasing extant sea ice.









Oh, and your article is from 2014. Not exactly current.

Ice shelves in Antarctica are NOT melting at an extremely fast pace. Nor does meltwater from them lead to more sea ice! Time to contact reality. The ONLY scientific concern about Antarctic ice had been the Pine Island glacier whose base attachment to the continent is slowly being eroded by slightly warmer sea currents (Circumpolar Deep Water) upwelling there. Pine Island has calved some huge icebergs, one in 2001 and again in 2013, not from warming, just normal, age old processes.
 
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Antarctic Ice Shelf Thinning from Above... and Below : Environment : Nature World News

One of Antarctica's largest ice shelves is thinning from above and below, helping scientists finally understand just what exactly is causing this rapid ice melt, according to new research.

The Larsen C Ice Shelf - whose neighbors Larsen A and B, collapsed in 1995 and 2002 - has long puzzled scientists. They have debated for decades whether warming air temperatures or warmer ocean currents are behind the collapse of the Antarctic Peninsula's floating ice shelves.

No, I'm not talking about 200 years from present day. But new research has shown evidence of a 200-year lag between climate events in Greenland and Antarctica during the last ice age, and it could possibly help shed light on the consequences of climate change in the future.
Climate Changes Affect Greenland First, Antarctica in 200 Years
For anyone even halfway familiar with climate change, they are probably growing tired of hearing it - but all the same, it should be said: Antarctica's exceptionally important ice shelves are crumbling away at increasingly worrying rates, and we have climate change to blame.
Antarctic Ice Shelves Are Melting Faster Than Ever Before... Again

But new findings, published in the journal The Cryosphere, is shedding light on this phenomenon, and Antarctica's likely contribution to future sea-level rise.

Using a combination of satellite data and radar surveys, the research team studied the Larsen C Ice Shelf for 15 years, from 1998-2012. Over that time period, they found that this slab of ice lost an average of 4 meters (13 feet) of ice, and had lowered by an average of one meter (~3 feet) at the surface.

"What's exciting about this study is we now know that two different processes are causing Larsen C to thin and become less stable. Air is being lost from the top layer of snow (called the firn), which is becoming more compacted - probably because of increased melting by a warmer atmosphere. We know also that Larsen C is losing ice, probably from warmer ocean currents or changing ice flow," lead author Dr. Paul Holland from British Antarctic Survey (BAS) explained in a press release.

"If this vast ice shelf - which is over two and a half times the size of Wales and 10 times bigger than Larsen B - was to collapse, it would allow the tributary glaciers behind it to flow faster into the sea. This would then contribute to sea-level rise," he added.


It is no secret that much of Antarctica, not just the Larsen C Ice Shelf, is melting faster than ever. The Antarctic Peninsula is one of the fastest warming regions on Earth, with a temperature rise of 2.5 degrees Celsius over the last 50 years.

While the research team continues to closely monitor the ice shelf, they predict that it could completely collapse within the next century, or sooner.

Even more concerning is that a crack is forming in the ice, which could cause it to retreat back further than previously observed. In addition, the ice shelf also appears to be detaching from a small island called Bawden Ice Rise at its northern edge.

"When Larsen A and B were lost, the glaciers behind them accelerated and they are now contributing a significant fraction of the sea-level rise from the whole of Antarctica. Larsen C is bigger and if it were to be lost in the next few decades then it would actually add to the projections of sea-level rise by 2100," said Professor David Vaughan, glaciologist and Director of Science at BAS.

"We expect that sea-level rise around the world will be something in excess of 50 cm higher by 2100 than it is at present and that will cause problems for coastal and low-lying cities," he continued. "Understanding and counting up these small contributions from Larsen C and all the glaciers around the world is very important if we are to project, with confidence, the rate of sea-level rise into the future."

TagsAntarctica, antarctic ice sheet, Larsen C Ice Shelf, ice melt, climate change, global warming, temperatures, warming, Antarctic Peninsula, sea level rise, global sea level rise, rising sea levels
© 2015 NatureWorldNews.com All rights reserved.

FAIR USE NOTICE: This posting may contain copyrighted material the use of which has not always been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. The use of the material is to advance understanding of various issues, etc. I believe this constitutes a 'fair use' of any such copyrighted material as provided for in section 107 of the US Copyright Law.
 
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Lunchboxxy

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Ice shelves in Antarctica are NOT melting at an extremely fast pace. Nor does meltwater from them lead to more sea ice! Time to contact reality. The ONLY scientific concern about Antarctic ice had been the Pine Island glacier whose base attachment to the continent is slowly being eroded by slightly warmer sea currents (Circumpolar Deep Water) upwelling there. Pine Island has calved some huge icebergs, one in 2001 and again in 2013, not from warming, just normal, age old processes.
I suggest you actually read the article next time instead of just looking at the pretty picture. Throwing out big words like CDW isn't impressive if you don't actually know what it means.

Changes to Circumpolar Deep Water - AntarcticGlaciers.org

You literally just made the rest of that shit up.
 
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I suggest you actually read the article next time instead of just looking at the pretty picture. Throwing out big words like CDW isn't impressive if you don't actually know what it means.

Changes to Circumpolar Deep Water - AntarcticGlaciers.org

You literally just made the rest of that shit up.[/QUOTE

You're hopeless. When you can't read simple English with even mediocre comprehension, I won't waste time trying to provide you facts. But for other intelligent, curious readers, take a look at:

Antarctic ice shelf melt 'lowest EVER recorded, global warming is NOT eroding it' ? The Register
 

Lunchboxxy

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Apr 2010
21,322
26,028
Oregon
I suggest you actually read the article next time instead of just looking at the pretty picture. Throwing out big words like CDW isn't impressive if you don't actually know what it means.

Changes to Circumpolar Deep Water - AntarcticGlaciers.org

You literally just made the rest of that shit up.[/QUOTE

You're hopeless. When you can't read simple English with even mediocre comprehension, I won't waste time trying to provide you facts. But for other intelligent, curious readers, take a look at:

Antarctic ice shelf melt 'lowest EVER recorded, global warming is NOT eroding it' ? The Register
Well that was weird