Nine reasons for Scepticism, part 2 - The Universe

Czernobog

Former Staff
Dec 2011
35,477
20,092
Phoenix, AZ
#1
Okay...so my first reason didn't seem to generate a whole lot of buzz. Let's see if my second reason garners a bit more atention:

Our insignificant place in the Universe.

Our Sun is an unremarkable star, in a boring little solar system, at the ass-end of a mediocre galaxy which is completely unremarkable among the 100 thousand other galaxies in the known universe. It has been estimated that there are some 30 billion planets in the Milky Way alone, any one of 100 million of which likely has an Earth-like atmosphere capable of supporting life. The number of likely life supporting planets in the Universe is 30 billion times 100 billion - a number so astronomical that there isn't even a name for it. It's quite probable, therefore, that life exists somewhere other than here.

Then there's the question of time. The universe came into being 13.5 billion years ago. Humans developed a mere five million years ago. In other words, we have only existed for 0.000036% of the time that the universe existed. Astronomers estimate that the Sun is going to burn itself out in about another 5 billion years. So, assuming that the planet doesn't become uninhabitable before then, or that some life ending catastrophe, like the asteroid that ended the dinosaurs, or a solar megaflare,or some other mass extinction event doesn't beat the sun to it, when it explodes, and incinerates all of the inner planets, then, unless we have figured out a way to reach the stars, and colonise beyond our solar system, the entire length of human existence will be a whopping 0.0014% of that of the known universe.

How plausible is it, then, that some creator made this entire cosmic machinery solely for the benefit of our puny little species, which exists for mere moments in cosmic history, and are a nearly infinitesimally tiny little speck in the whole of the universe. Just how grandiose, and delusional must humanity's over-blown sense of self-importance be to be so out of sync with the known dimensions of time, and space?
 
Likes: 1 person
Nov 2007
1,433
510
Prague, Czech Republic
#2
Then there's the question of time. The universe came into being 13.5 billion years ago. Humans developed a mere five million years ago. In other words, we have only existed for 0.000036% of the time that the universe existed. Astronomers estimate that the Sun is going to burn itself out in about another 5 billion years. So, assuming that the planet doesn't become uninhabitable before then, or that some life ending catastrophe, like the asteroid that ended the dinosaurs, or a solar megaflare, or some other mass extinction event doesn't beat the sun to it, when it explodes, and incinerates all of the inner planets, then, unless we have figured out a way to reach the stars, and colonise beyond our solar system, the entire length of human existence will be a whopping 0.0014% of that of the known universe.
You appear to have suffered a chronic arithmetic breakdown. If human civilisation lasts until the planet is incinerated, it will have lasted for approximately 1/4 of the universe's existence (5 billion out of almost 19 billion). I can't figure out where you've gone wrong.
 
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Jan 2012
3,528
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Vacaville, CA
#4
. . . scientists at the CERN complex at the Swiss-Franco border “play God” when they try to recreate, in miniature, elements of the Big Bang that started our universe. Their pursuit of the “God Particle” also suggests divine aspirations . . .Scientists and engineers created giant machines and a tunnel 17 miles in circumference for the purpose of studying subatomic particles. If they would construct something so humongous just to examine something so incredibly tiny, it is conceivable that God would create a giant universe just for the purpose of focusing on our speck of human life on Earth. The universe is God’s version of CERN.

More at: Cosmic Lab - Cloud 29
 

Czernobog

Former Staff
Dec 2011
35,477
20,092
Phoenix, AZ
#6
. . . scientists at the CERN complex at the Swiss-Franco border “play God” when they try to recreate, in miniature, elements of the Big Bang that started our universe. Their pursuit of the “God Particle” also suggests divine aspirations . . .Scientists and engineers created giant machines and a tunnel 17 miles in circumference for the purpose of studying subatomic particles. If they would construct something so humongous just to examine something so incredibly tiny, it is conceivable that God would create a giant universe just for the purpose of focusing on our speck of human life on Earth. The universe is God’s version of CERN.

More at: Cosmic Lab - Cloud 29
Apples, and oranges. Scientists aren't studying something "tiny"; they are seeking to understand who the entire universe came into being. There is nothing "tiny" about that. Sorry, the analogy fails, and still demonstrates an unbelievable conceit to consider that a creator engineered the entirety of all of time, and space, just for us.
 
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Jan 2012
3,528
1,617
Vacaville, CA
#7
Apples, and oranges. Scientists aren't studying something "tiny"; they are seeking to understand who the entire universe came into being. There is nothing "tiny" about that. Sorry, the analogy fails, and still demonstrates an unbelievable conceit to consider that a creator engineered the entirety of all of time, and space, just for us.
Subatomic particles are tiny and the "God particle" is tiny. Regardless of how "big" their conclusions, the scientists are still studying and measuring very tiny particles. God may be experimenting with our tiny humanity because he may have much bigger plans for us. Why should there be arbitrary limits on the size of God's cosmic lab?
 

Czernobog

Former Staff
Dec 2011
35,477
20,092
Phoenix, AZ
#8
Subatomic particles are tiny and the "God particle" is tiny. Regardless of how "big" their conclusions, the scientists are still studying and measuring very tiny particles. God may be experimenting with our tiny humanity because he may have much bigger plans for us. Why should there be arbitrary limits on the size of God's cosmic lab?
I would be tempted to agree with your proposal, were we discussing a Creator who, like the scientists at CERN, set up the experiment, and allowed it to run it's course without interference. However, the hubris of theists is that after setting up this cosmic lab of yours, this Creator repeatedly interferes with the test subjects in order to alter the outcomes. That rather destroys your scientist God who just wants to see how the experiment plays out.

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StanStill

Former Staff
Dec 2013
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Work
#9
Homo Sapiens has only been in existence around 200,000 years, not 5m.
And while we're at it, there are estimated to be (IIRC) between 100 and 200 billion galaxies in the known universe, not thousand. Whatever. So we're even far less significant. The thing is, if you believe in God, why not believe that he created life billions of times on planets circling any of the 10^21 stars in existence? Most stars are many light years from the nearest star, and even if the inhabitants of some planet ever advanced to the stage where they could search for life on other planets, they would have to luck out and be reasonably close to a planet where life had happened to develop during the exact same tiny sliver of the universe's 13.5 billion year lifespan.

Until you find life somewhere else, you're alone.
 
May 2012
64,412
12,208
By the wall
#10
The Bible doesn't say he created everything just for us.

In fact, it doesn't mention beings on other planets at all. For all we know God has filled the entire universe with life.

Every generation there are Christians who feel they are living in the end times but frankly I think it won't happen for millions of years.