NOT SINCE 9/11: Medical/psychological professionals see sharp rise of fear/anxiety/stress/uncertainity. It has a name, "Trump Anxiety Disorder"

Jul 2015
33,175
24,603
Florida
#1
Gee and many of us, not exclusively on this board, are told we are exhibiting TDS. Well at least the Trump FANS, apologists or cultists got TWO of the letters right. TDS isn't 'measurable', TAD is. This might be one of the SADDEST assessments of American's state of mental health around politics that I've ever read. And though we call WASHINGTON, the first president, the "the father of our country", I personally have never ascribed a parental role to any presidents in my lifetime but I understand it. (I feel sure many looked to Roosevelt for something more than an elected leader and president in their time).

There is a silver lining here for me. I've talked around these dynamics since last summer, I understood early (I was psych major). And though those of us on this board have MORE than a passing interest in POLITICS, I knew something else was going on. And it wasn't good. It was cemented when I went to see my own MD for an annual physical back in MAR. I brought it up . I asked if their (5 person practice) patients were bringing up the current state of politics in their practice. You know, regular people. My doc who has a very even keeled quiet bedside manner, eyes got WIDE, she nodded her head a couple of times and said 'oh yeah'. I did NOT ask any specifics.

In an era of media saturation presidents tend to be omnipresent figures.
And even polarizing figures like Bill Clinton after the Oklahoma City bombing
or George W. Bush after 9/11 served as national consolers—suggesting
the way people subconsciously assign an almost parental role to the presidency.


Trump’s relentless self-aggrandizement, under this interpretation,
makes him less a national father than adolescent at large.


Authority figures represent the parent, [so] President Trump sits in the seat of parent for all Americans
,” said Baum-Baicker. “So now, my ‘father figure’ is a bully, is an authoritarian

who doesn’t believe in studying and doing homework. ... [Rather than reassurance] he creates uncertainty.

Trump May Not Be Crazy, But the Rest of Us Are Getting There Fast
Psychologists’ couches are filling up as Americans seek relief from Trump Anxiety Disorder.

By JOHN F. HARRIS and SARAH ZIMMERMAN

October 12, 2018

THE FRIDAY COVER


CNN before love-making is not his idea of a turn-on. But she can hardly turn it off—engrossed as she is in the latest unnerving gyrations of Washington.

Who else to blame but Donald Trump? A president who excites hot feelings in many quarters has cooled them considerably in the bedroom of a Philadelphia couple, who sought counseling in part because the agitated state of American politics was causing strain in their marriage.

The couple’s story was relayed to POLITICO by their therapist on condition of the couple's anonymity. But their travails, according to national surveys and interviews with mental health professionals, are not as anomalous as one might suppose. Even when symptoms are not sexual in nature, there is abundant evidence that Trump and his daily uproars are galloping into the inner life of millions of Americans.

During normal times, therapists say, their sessions deal with familiar themes: relationships, self-esteem, everyday coping. Current events don’t usually invade. But numerous counselors said Trump and his convulsive effect on America’s national conversation are giving politics a prominence on the psychologist’s couch not seen since the months after 9/11—another moment in which events were frightening in a way that had widespread emotional consequences.

Empirical data bolster the anecdotal reports from practitioners. The American Psychiatric Association in a May survey found that 39 percent of people said their anxiety level had risen over the previous year—and 56 percent were either “extremely anxious” or “somewhat anxious about “the impact of politics on daily life.” A 2017 study found two-thirds of Americans’ see the nation’s future as a “very or somewhat significant source of stress.”...


Trump May Not Be Crazy, But the Rest of Us Are Getting There Fast
 
Last edited:
Dec 2014
17,122
6,153
The Milky Way
#2
I hope that your thread helps all the ones suffering.

The TDS Fueled© crowd on PH, go and get the help that you need. Seriously, there are any number of you here on this board. The OP describes YOU! And you know who you are.
 
Jul 2015
33,175
24,603
Florida
#3
I hope that your thread helps all the ones suffering.

The TDS Fueled© crowd on PH, go and get the help that you need. Seriously, there are any number of you here on this board. The OP describes YOU! And you know who you are.
You can call it TDS until your fingers bleed. Doesn't make it true.
 
Likes: Friday13
Jan 2014
18,193
5,186
California
#4
Gee and many of us, not exclusively on this board, are told we are exhibiting TDS. Well at least the Trump FANS, apologists or cultists got TWO of the letters right. TDS isn't 'measurable', TAD is. This might be one of the SADDEST assessments of American's state of mental health around politics that I've ever read. And though we call WASHINGTON, the first president, the "the father of our country", I personally have never ascribed a parental role to any presidents in my lifetime but I understand it. (I feel sure many looked to Roosevelt for something more than an elected leader and president in their time).

There is a silver lining here for me. I've talked around these dynamics since last summer, I understood early (I was psych major). And though those of us on this board have MORE than a passing interest in POLITICS, I knew something else was going on. And it wasn't good. It was cemented when I went to see my own MD for an annual physical back in MAR. I brought it up . I asked if their (5 person practice) patients were bringing up the current state of politics in their practice. You know, regular people. My doc who has a very even keeled quiet bedside manner, eyes got WIDE, she nodded her head a couple of times and said 'oh yeah'. I did NOT ask any specifics.

In an era of media saturation presidents tend to be omnipresent figures.
And even polarizing figures like Bill Clinton after the Oklahoma City bombing
or George W. Bush after 9/11 served as national consolers—suggesting
the way people subconsciously assign an almost parental role to the presidency.


Trump’s relentless self-aggrandizement, under this interpretation,
makes him less a national father than adolescent at large.


Authority figures represent the parent, [so] President Trump sits in the seat of parent for all Americans
,” said Baum-Baicker. “So now, my ‘father figure’ is a bully, is an authoritarian

who doesn’t believe in studying and doing homework. ... [Rather than reassurance] he creates uncertainty.

Trump May Not Be Crazy, But the Rest of Us Are Getting There Fast
Psychologists’ couches are filling up as Americans seek relief from Trump Anxiety Disorder.

By JOHN F. HARRIS and SARAH ZIMMERMAN

October 12, 2018

THE FRIDAY COVER


CNN before love-making is not his idea of a turn-on. But she can hardly turn it off—engrossed as she is in the latest unnerving gyrations of Washington.

Who else to blame but Donald Trump? A president who excites hot feelings in many quarters has cooled them considerably in the bedroom of a Philadelphia couple, who sought counseling in part because the agitated state of American politics was causing strain in their marriage.

The couple’s story was relayed to POLITICO by their therapist on condition of the couple's anonymity. But their travails, according to national surveys and interviews with mental health professionals, are not as anomalous as one might suppose. Even when symptoms are not sexual in nature, there is abundant evidence that Trump and his daily uproars are galloping into the inner life of millions of Americans.

During normal times, therapists say, their sessions deal with familiar themes: relationships, self-esteem, everyday coping. Current events don’t usually invade. But numerous counselors said Trump and his convulsive effect on America’s national conversation are giving politics a prominence on the psychologist’s couch not seen since the months after 9/11—another moment in which events were frightening in a way that had widespread emotional consequences.

Empirical data bolster the anecdotal reports from practitioners. The American Psychiatric Association in a May survey found that 39 percent of people said their anxiety level had risen over the previous year—and 56 percent were either “extremely anxious” or “somewhat anxious about “the impact of politics on daily life.” A 2017 study found two-thirds of Americans’ see the nation’s future as a “very or somewhat significant source of stress.”...


Trump May Not Be Crazy, But the Rest of Us Are Getting There Fast
Ms. picture taker,

And you guys scoffed with we said "liberalism is a mental disease."
 
Apr 2015
1,368
452
Mid ATL
#5
Gee and many of us, not exclusively on this board, are told we are exhibiting TDS. Well at least the Trump FANS, apologists or cultists got TWO of the letters right. TDS isn't 'measurable', TAD is. This might be one of the SADDEST assessments of American's state of mental health around politics that I've ever read. And though we call WASHINGTON, the first president, the "the father of our country", I personally have never ascribed a parental role to any presidents in my lifetime but I understand it. (I feel sure many looked to Roosevelt for something more than an elected leader and president in their time).

There is a silver lining here for me. I've talked around these dynamics since last summer, I understood early (I was psych major). And though those of us on this board have MORE than a passing interest in POLITICS, I knew something else was going on. And it wasn't good. It was cemented when I went to see my own MD for an annual physical back in MAR. I brought it up . I asked if their (5 person practice) patients were bringing up the current state of politics in their practice. You know, regular people. My doc who has a very even keeled quiet bedside manner, eyes got WIDE, she nodded her head a couple of times and said 'oh yeah'. I did NOT ask any specifics.

In an era of media saturation presidents tend to be omnipresent figures.
And even polarizing figures like Bill Clinton after the Oklahoma City bombing
or George W. Bush after 9/11 served as national consolers—suggesting
the way people subconsciously assign an almost parental role to the presidency.


Trump’s relentless self-aggrandizement, under this interpretation,
makes him less a national father than adolescent at large.


Authority figures represent the parent, [so] President Trump sits in the seat of parent for all Americans
,” said Baum-Baicker. “So now, my ‘father figure’ is a bully, is an authoritarian

who doesn’t believe in studying and doing homework. ... [Rather than reassurance] he creates uncertainty.

Trump May Not Be Crazy, But the Rest of Us Are Getting There Fast
Psychologists’ couches are filling up as Americans seek relief from Trump Anxiety Disorder.

By JOHN F. HARRIS and SARAH ZIMMERMAN

October 12, 2018

THE FRIDAY COVER


CNN before love-making is not his idea of a turn-on. But she can hardly turn it off—engrossed as she is in the latest unnerving gyrations of Washington.

Who else to blame but Donald Trump? A president who excites hot feelings in many quarters has cooled them considerably in the bedroom of a Philadelphia couple, who sought counseling in part because the agitated state of American politics was causing strain in their marriage.

The couple’s story was relayed to POLITICO by their therapist on condition of the couple's anonymity. But their travails, according to national surveys and interviews with mental health professionals, are not as anomalous as one might suppose. Even when symptoms are not sexual in nature, there is abundant evidence that Trump and his daily uproars are galloping into the inner life of millions of Americans.

During normal times, therapists say, their sessions deal with familiar themes: relationships, self-esteem, everyday coping. Current events don’t usually invade. But numerous counselors said Trump and his convulsive effect on America’s national conversation are giving politics a prominence on the psychologist’s couch not seen since the months after 9/11—another moment in which events were frightening in a way that had widespread emotional consequences.

Empirical data bolster the anecdotal reports from practitioners. The American Psychiatric Association in a May survey found that 39 percent of people said their anxiety level had risen over the previous year—and 56 percent were either “extremely anxious” or “somewhat anxious about “the impact of politics on daily life.” A 2017 study found two-thirds of Americans’ see the nation’s future as a “very or somewhat significant source of stress.”...


Trump May Not Be Crazy, But the Rest of Us Are Getting There Fast
Before you take the TAD test, you ought to have to take an IQ test. If you’re really so dumb as to think Trump is affecting your personal and professional life, you need something else besides treatment for TAD.
I’d start with a lobotomy. Some people don’t have enough intelligence or sanity to invest into political debate, as this forum proves everyday.
 
Dec 2014
17,122
6,153
The Milky Way
#6
Before you take the TAD test, you ought to have to take an IQ test. If you’re really so dumb as to think Trump is affecting your personal and professional life, you need something else besides treatment for TAD.
I’d start with a lobotomy. Some people don’t have enough intelligence or sanity to invest into political debate, as this forum proves everyday.

It is derangement, thus TDS is the correct diagnosis. And it is all over PH 24/7/365.
 
Likes: carpe diem
Dec 2006
8,658
10,697
required field
#7
I'm a K-8 educator in a public school, and everyone I've talked to at work agrees the kids seem to be acting out and having anxiety-related behavior problems much more than last year. Last year fights on the playground were fairly rare, but this year they've been happening multiple times a week. Their parents are more combative with the staff this year, too. There is much uncertainty and anxiety in the general population, and the kids are soaking it up like the little sponges they are. Nobody is really sure what's going to happen next, but everyone is on edge and it feels like we're all just waiting for something to happen.
 
Jan 2011
31,134
4,315
Boise, Idaho
#10
I'm a K-8 educator in a public school, and everyone I've talked to at work agrees the kids seem to be acting out and having anxiety-related behavior problems much more than last year. Last year fights on the playground were fairly rare, but this year they've been happening multiple times a week. Their parents are more combative with the staff this year, too. There is much uncertainty and anxiety in the general population, and the kids are soaking it up like the little sponges they are. Nobody is really sure what's going to happen next, but everyone is on edge and it feels like we're all just waiting for something to happen.
Well...when you teach them that the loudest and meanest get the attention...(you is not directed at YOU, it's used as a general term)