NRA - 'Reasonable Killing' of a 13-Year-Old Boy

Aug 2016
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#1
When NRA Calls the Shots: Reasonable Killing of a Boy - Rolling Stone

News cameras filmed Martinez Smith-Payne as he lay recovering in a bed at St. Louis Children's Hospital. He was 10 years old, and had discovered a firework in a barren field in the northern part of the city. After he lit the fuse, it exploded in his left hand, blowing off all of his fingers except the thumb. When he later appeared on television, his destroyed hand was wrapped in a ball of gauze, and his eyes were covered with a mask, partially concealing his delicate face. Martinez was a small, frightened boy, but for his mother, Frances Smith-Woods, he made a show of bravery. "He was telling me it's OK," she said at the time. "I guess he didn't know the severity of it."

Three years later, on November 28th, 2015, Martinez and two of his friends — Ernest Williams, 14, and another boy, who was 11 — climbed onto their bicycles and set off under a full moon from the St. Louis neighborhood of Walnut Park East, one of the most dangerous areas of a city with the highest homicide rate in the United States. Martinez, Ernest's little cousin, was then 13. He had small ears and sharp cheekbones. He liked Hot Wheels cars, Nick Cannon and The Polar Bear Express. He weighed 89 pounds. His earlier accident had not raised his threshold for pain. When he received shots at the doctor, multiple family members had to hold him down.

Like almost everyone in Walnut Park East, the three boys were African-American. They rode their bikes past rows of dilapidated, single-story structures with broken gutters and broken windows, sagging porches and peeling paint. Some homes appeared to list heavily, as if about to topple over. Others were boarded up and empty, with signs posted produced by the city that read "No Loitering."

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Rasselas

Former Staff
Feb 2010
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#4
So you are good with the NRA's stance?
I wish I knew what it was. You should have quoted the part of the story where they actually refer to your thread topic. Do I really have to read the entire article of long-form journalism to participate in the thread?
 
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Aug 2016
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#5
I wish I knew what it was. You should have quoted the part of the story where they actually refer to your thread topic. Do I really have to read the entire article of long-form journalism to participate in the thread?
Ok, let's start with this part.
"When police did their first interview with McDade, he told them that he was legally barred from owning a firearm due to a felony conviction two decades earlier."
Are you ok with the NRA's stance regarding this statement?
 
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Rasselas

Former Staff
Feb 2010
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#6
Ok, let's start with this part.
"When police did their first interview with McDade, he told them that he was legally barred from owning a firearm due to a felony conviction two decades earlier."
Are you ok with the NRA's stance regarding this statement?
What is it? Does the NRA really say it's okay for felons to own guns? That goes against their stated policy for decades, which is that we don't need more gun laws--we need to enforce the ones we have against bad actors.
 
Aug 2016
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#7
What is it? Does the NRA really say it's okay for felons to own guns? That goes against their stated policy for decades, which is that we don't need more gun laws--we need to enforce the ones we have against bad actors.
They have blanketed this as a justified killing.
So really how hard is the NRA working to ensure that felons don't get guns?
 
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Nov 2013
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#8
What is it? Does the NRA really say it's okay for felons to own guns? That goes against their stated policy for decades, which is that we don't need more gun laws--we need to enforce the ones we have against bad actors.
Well the NRA is definitely against expanding background checks to internet sales and gun shows, thereby providing convicted felons an easy access to gun purchase.. or not ?
 
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Jul 2014
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Border Fence
#9
Point to the story:

Don't break into other people's cars or you may get shot.
You seem confused. The act of breaking into the auto had ended. They were in the act of fleeing. The threat to life and property had ended. The home owner was still armed and could still defend his life and property.

One has the right to protect life and property.

Lets not confuse one act with another.
 
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Rasselas

Former Staff
Feb 2010
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#10
Well the NRA is definitely against expanding background checks to internet sales and gun shows, thereby providing convicted felons an easy access to gun purchase.. or not ?
The NRA is a wholly-owned lobby group for the gun industry. Their ultimate goal is to create in the US a society in which everyone feels the need to own a gun--to normalize the carrying of firearms in the way that we've arranged our economic relations to necessitate owning a car. That's why "stand your ground" laws are so great for them--they protect armed people such that everyone will eventually feel the need to be armed.
 

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