On This Day in History

Feb 2011
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The formerly great golden state
On May 9th:

In the year 1978 (41 years ago): David R. Berkowitz pleaded guilty to murder, attempted murder and assault in connection with the 'Son of Sam' shootings that claimed six lives and terrified New Yorkers. [Berkowitz was sentenced to six consecutive life prison terms.]

In the year 1980 (39 years ago): 35 people were killed when a freighter rammed the Sunshine Skyway Bridge over Tampa Bay in Florida, causing a 1,400-foot section of the southbound span to collapse.

In the year 1987 (32 years ago): Gary Hart. dogged by questions about his personal life, including his relationship with Miami model Donna Rice, withdrew from the race for the Democratic Presidential nomination.

In the year 1994 (25 years ago): South Africa's newly elected parliament chose Nelson Mandela to be the country's first black President.

In the year 2017 (2 years ago): President Donald Trump abruptly fired FBI Director James Comey, ousting the nation's top law enforcement official in the midst of an FBI investigation into whether Trump's campaign had ties to Russia's meddling in the election that sent him to the White House.

first bolded: Too bad he didn't run in 2016 when such things didn't matter.
second bolded: and that's not obstruction of justice?
 
Feb 2011
16,445
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The formerly great golden state
May 10: On this day in 1869, 100 years before the US sent men to the moon, the presidents of the Union Pacific and Central Pacific railroads drove that last, ceremonial spike uniting the two railroads and uniting the country with steel rails. The era of the wagon train was over.
 
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Jan 2016
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first bolded: Too bad he didn't run in 2016 when such things didn't matter.
second bolded: and that's not obstruction of justice?
Gary Hart would have made an excellent President. I very much wanted him to beat Walter Mondale in 1984 for the Democratic nomination. He would have given Ronald Reagan a MUCH tougher battle than Mondale did, I can tell you that!
 
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The Man

Former Staff
Jul 2011
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20 years ago, Zemfira Ramazanova, then just an obscure young rock singer from Bashkortostan (autonomous Muslim-majority republic on the Volga river), little known outside her home region, released her first ever album, simply titled with her first name, 'Zemfira'


It was a sensation, her disks flew off the shelves; by the time she arrived to Moscow itself for her first ever concert at the capital an few months later, she was already famous everywhere

By a year later, 2000, she was a superstar

Today, Zemfira is one of the biggest names in Russian music
 
Feb 2011
16,445
10,834
The formerly great golden state
May 15, 1937

Madeline Albright, America's first female secretary of state, is born
On this day in 1937, Madeleine Albright, America’s first female secretary of state, is born Maria Jana Korbelova in Prague, Czechoslovakia (now the Czech Republic).
The daughter of Czech diplomat Josef Korbel, Albright fled to England with her family after the Nazis occupied Czechoslovakia in 1939. Though Albright long believed they had fled for political reasons, she learned as an adult that her family was Jewish and that three of her grandparents had died in Nazi concentration camps.
 

boontito

Future Staff
Jan 2008
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1980: Mt. St. Helens erupts.

Probably one of the most dominant memories from my childhood. The sky was pretty much black for a day and a half. City snow plows were out on the road removing the ash. All sorts of health warnings, some funny looking back, about being outside.

 

The Man

Former Staff
Jul 2011
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Also May 18th, 1703, during a Russo-Swedish war, two Swedish warships, "Astrild" and "Gedan" had separated from a larger fleeting totaling 9 vessels in all, and dropped anchor near a fortress which had formerly belonged to the Swedes but had earlier fallen to the Russians and was now exchanging sporadic cannon fire with the Swedish fleet; in the night, under cover of darkness, Russian troops in as many as 30 rowing boats quietly approached and surrounded the two enemy ships and captured them

The Russian forces were led by a certain "bombardier-captain Piotr Mikhailov". This was, in fact, a pseudonym often used back then by Russia's Emperor Peter the Great. Yep, he personally led his men in this battle! That was just the sort of guy he was. I mention him a lot in this thread, he did lots of historic things, the tradition of awarding medals to officers and other accomplished people originated with him in Russia; he founded the nation's first ever police force in St. Petersburg; hell, he designed that city itself as his new capital; etc...

Hell of a historical figure


This is considered Russia's first big naval victory. And the modern Naval Infantry, Russian Marines, see this battle as the birth place of their branch too