Outcry as Australian police raid news outlet

Mar 2012
56,122
37,705
New Hampshire
#1
A police raid on Australian Broadcasting Corp (ABC) has drawn fire from broadcasters and rights groups.

Officers arrived at the public broadcaster's Sydney headquarters with search warrants naming two reporters and the news director. The ABC has protested over the raid. Police searched the home of a News Corp journalist on Tuesday, sparking alarm. The BBC said it was "deeply troubling" for a broadcaster to be searched.

The leading journalists' union in the country said the two raids represented a "disturbing pattern of assaults on Australian press freedom". Other unions and human rights groups also condemned the actions. In a statement ABC Managing Director David Anderson said the police raid "raises legitimate concerns over freedom of the press". "The ABC stands by its journalists, will protect its sources and continue to report without fear or favour on national security and intelligence issues when there is a clear public interest."

Wednesday's search is about the 2017 investigative series known as The Afghan Files which "revealed allegations of unlawful killings and misconduct by Australian special forces in Afghanistan". The broadcaster said the series was "based off hundreds of pages of secret defence documents leaked to the ABC". The Australian Federal Police said the warrant was in relation to "allegations of publishing classified material" and that it "relates to a referral received on 11 July 2017 from the Chief of the Defence Force and the then-Acting Secretary for Defence".

The police said Tuesday's and Wednesday's raids were not connected, adding: "Both however relate to separate allegations of publishing classified material, contrary to provisions of the Crimes Act 1914, which is an extremely serious matter that has the potential to undermine Australia's national security." ABC journalist John Lyons, who live-tweeted the raid, said that police were going through 9,214 documents found on the ABC systems one-by-one, including "thousands of internal ABC emails".

Outcry as Australian broadcaster ABC raided by police
 
Jun 2014
61,172
35,365
Cleveland, Ohio
#2
A police raid on Australian Broadcasting Corp (ABC) has drawn fire from broadcasters and rights groups.

Officers arrived at the public broadcaster's Sydney headquarters with search warrants naming two reporters and the news director. The ABC has protested over the raid. Police searched the home of a News Corp journalist on Tuesday, sparking alarm. The BBC said it was "deeply troubling" for a broadcaster to be searched.

The leading journalists' union in the country said the two raids represented a "disturbing pattern of assaults on Australian press freedom". Other unions and human rights groups also condemned the actions. In a statement ABC Managing Director David Anderson said the police raid "raises legitimate concerns over freedom of the press". "The ABC stands by its journalists, will protect its sources and continue to report without fear or favour on national security and intelligence issues when there is a clear public interest."

Wednesday's search is about the 2017 investigative series known as The Afghan Files which "revealed allegations of unlawful killings and misconduct by Australian special forces in Afghanistan". The broadcaster said the series was "based off hundreds of pages of secret defence documents leaked to the ABC". The Australian Federal Police said the warrant was in relation to "allegations of publishing classified material" and that it "relates to a referral received on 11 July 2017 from the Chief of the Defence Force and the then-Acting Secretary for Defence".

The police said Tuesday's and Wednesday's raids were not connected, adding: "Both however relate to separate allegations of publishing classified material, contrary to provisions of the Crimes Act 1914, which is an extremely serious matter that has the potential to undermine Australia's national security." ABC journalist John Lyons, who live-tweeted the raid, said that police were going through 9,214 documents found on the ABC systems one-by-one, including "thousands of internal ABC emails".

Outcry as Australian broadcaster ABC raided by police
Wow. Even Nixon never ordered a raid on the NYT.

ACLU History: The Pentagon Papers: Defending Freedom of the Press During Times of War
 
Dec 2014
13,707
11,342
NWOHQ
#3
The AFP (Aus. Federal Police) have released a statement claiming the raid isn't politically motivated, but rather the result of an investigation into the use of classified material. However, one must remain sceptical, for conservative governments have hated and undermined the ABC for decades (owing to several damning exposes) and I'm sure that today in Liberal Party headquarters (the Liberal Party is conservative in Aust.) there is much rejoicing. The only thing keeping the Liberals from shutting down the ABC is public opinion, for the backlash would be political suicide.

Already, public outrage is growing throughout all forms of media, so this accusation better have legs.