Pentagon blames Trump for rise of ISIS in Iraq and Syria

Rev. Hellh0und

Former Staff
Jul 2011
73,915
15,272
Somewhere below 14th and East.
There is no death penalty for being gay in Arabia.. Maybe you're thinking of Iran or some other country.

In 2019, Saudi Arabia had a mass execution of 37 men who were generally accused of espionage or terrorism for Iran. Five of these men were additionally accused of having had sex with each other.[26]

In 2000, the Saudi government reported that it had sentenced nine Saudi men to extensive prison terms with lashing for engaging in cross-dressing and homosexual relations.[11] That same year the government executed three Yemeni male workers for homosexuality and child molestation.[12]

In 2001, the Saudi government established formal criminal procedure rules, although many courts have been slow to adopt the rules.

In 2001, Saudi teacher and playwright Muhammad Al-Suhaimi was charged with promoting homosexuality and after a trial was sentenced to prison. In 2006, he was given a pardon and allowed to resume teaching.[13]

In May 2005, the government arrested 92 men for homosexuality, who were given sentences ranging from fines to prison sentences of several months and lashings. Likewise, on 7 November 2005 Riyadh police raided what the Saudi press called a "beauty contest for gay men" at al-Qatif. What became of the five men arrested for organizing the event is not known.[14]

Persons caught living in the kingdom illegally are often accused of other crimes, involving illegal drugs, pornography, prostitution and homosexuality. Several such police crackdowns were reported in 2004–2005.[15] A similar raid in 2008 netted Filipino workers arrested on charges of alcohol and gay prostitution.[16] The Arab News newspaper article on the arrests stated, "Gay rights are not recognized in the Middle East countries and the publication of any material promoting them is banned".[16]

International protests from human rights organizations prompted some Saudi officials within the Saudi Arabian embassy in Washington D.C. to unofficially and incorrectly imply that their kingdom will only use the death penalty when someone has been convicted of child molestation, rape, sexual assault, murder or engaging in anything deemed to be a form of political advocacy.[17]

In 2010, Prince Saud bin Abdulaziz bin Nasir al Saud was found guilty at the Old Bailey of murdering his servant Bandar Abdulaziz in their suite at the Landmark Hotel in London.[18] During the trial, it was alleged that the prince had received a "sexual massage" before the murder, and that he and Abdulaziz had been in a sexual relationship. According to the prosecutor, the Prince sexually and physically abused his servant as well as paid other men for sexual services.[19][20] He was sentenced to life imprisonment. In March 2013, he was allowed to return to Saudi Arabia to serve the remainder of his term in a Saudi prison. According to the agreement between the U.K. and Saudi Arabia, he must serve at least 20 years before he can be released.[21]

In 2011–2012 the Saudi newspaper Okaz announced that the government had arrested over 260 people for the crime of homosexuality over a one-year period. According to the official report, the men were caught cross-dressing, wearing ladies makeup and trying to pick up other men.[22]

During this government crackdown on homosexuality, the CPVPV was permitted to make certain high-profile arrests.

In 2010, a 27-year-old Saudi man was sentenced to five years in prison, 500 lashes of the whip, and a SR50,000 fine after appearing in an amateur gay video online allegedly taken inside a Jeddah prison. According to an unnamed government source, "The District Court sentenced the accused in a homosexuality case that was referred to it by the CPVPV (the Hai'a) in Jeddah before he was tried for impersonating a security man and behaving shamefully and with conduct violating the Islamic teachings." The case started when the Hai'a's staff arrested the man under charges of practicing homosexuality. He was referred to the Bureau for Investigation and Prosecution, which referred him to the District Court.

Even government officials are not immune from criminal sanctions. A gay Saudi diplomat named Ali Ahmad Asseri applied for asylum in the United States after the Saudi government discovered his sexuality.[23]

Recent reports of people being executed for homosexuality often add other charges to the offense, typically theft, rape or murder. For example, a gay Yemeni was executed for homosexuality and murder in 2013.[24]

In 2014, a 24-year-old Saudi Arabian man was sentenced to three years detention and 450 lashes after a Medina court found him guilty of "promoting the vice and practice of homosexuality", after he was caught using Twitter to arrange dates with other men.[25]

In 2019, Saudi Arabia had a mass execution of 37 men who were generally accused of espionage or terrorism for Iran. Five of these men were additionally accused of having had sex with each other.[26]

On 13 October 2019, Saudi authorities arrested a 23-year-old national, Suhail al-Jameel, for posting a picture in of him wearing short shorts at the beach. He is a gay social media personality in Saudi Arabia, who openly documented his sexuality on Snapchat and Twitter. Al-Jameel wrote on Snapchat that he was arrested on the charges of sharing nudity online. Soon after fans started using #freesuhail hashtag on Twitter.[27]

In November 2019, two gay journalists from Saudi Arabia fled their home country, after interrogations and facing threats of being publicly outed. However, the pair was detained in Australia on November 15, while they attempted to seek asylum. The men alleged of being intimidated by guards, threatened with violence by other detainees and witnessing excessive use of drugs among them in the Australian detention centre.[28]
 
Jul 2019
4,353
4,436
Atlanta
In 2019, Saudi Arabia had a mass execution of 37 men who were generally accused of espionage or terrorism for Iran. Five of these men were additionally accused of having had sex with each other.[26]

In 2000, the Saudi government reported that it had sentenced nine Saudi men to extensive prison terms with lashing for engaging in cross-dressing and homosexual relations.[11] That same year the government executed three Yemeni male workers for homosexuality and child molestation.[12]

In 2001, the Saudi government established formal criminal procedure rules, although many courts have been slow to adopt the rules.

In 2001, Saudi teacher and playwright Muhammad Al-Suhaimi was charged with promoting homosexuality and after a trial was sentenced to prison. In 2006, he was given a pardon and allowed to resume teaching.[13]

In May 2005, the government arrested 92 men for homosexuality, who were given sentences ranging from fines to prison sentences of several months and lashings. Likewise, on 7 November 2005 Riyadh police raided what the Saudi press called a "beauty contest for gay men" at al-Qatif. What became of the five men arrested for organizing the event is not known.[14]

Persons caught living in the kingdom illegally are often accused of other crimes, involving illegal drugs, pornography, prostitution and homosexuality. Several such police crackdowns were reported in 2004–2005.[15] A similar raid in 2008 netted Filipino workers arrested on charges of alcohol and gay prostitution.[16] The Arab News newspaper article on the arrests stated, "Gay rights are not recognized in the Middle East countries and the publication of any material promoting them is banned".[16]

International protests from human rights organizations prompted some Saudi officials within the Saudi Arabian embassy in Washington D.C. to unofficially and incorrectly imply that their kingdom will only use the death penalty when someone has been convicted of child molestation, rape, sexual assault, murder or engaging in anything deemed to be a form of political advocacy.[17]

In 2010, Prince Saud bin Abdulaziz bin Nasir al Saud was found guilty at the Old Bailey of murdering his servant Bandar Abdulaziz in their suite at the Landmark Hotel in London.[18] During the trial, it was alleged that the prince had received a "sexual massage" before the murder, and that he and Abdulaziz had been in a sexual relationship. According to the prosecutor, the Prince sexually and physically abused his servant as well as paid other men for sexual services.[19][20] He was sentenced to life imprisonment. In March 2013, he was allowed to return to Saudi Arabia to serve the remainder of his term in a Saudi prison. According to the agreement between the U.K. and Saudi Arabia, he must serve at least 20 years before he can be released.[21]

In 2011–2012 the Saudi newspaper Okaz announced that the government had arrested over 260 people for the crime of homosexuality over a one-year period. According to the official report, the men were caught cross-dressing, wearing ladies makeup and trying to pick up other men.[22]

During this government crackdown on homosexuality, the CPVPV was permitted to make certain high-profile arrests.

In 2010, a 27-year-old Saudi man was sentenced to five years in prison, 500 lashes of the whip, and a SR50,000 fine after appearing in an amateur gay video online allegedly taken inside a Jeddah prison. According to an unnamed government source, "The District Court sentenced the accused in a homosexuality case that was referred to it by the CPVPV (the Hai'a) in Jeddah before he was tried for impersonating a security man and behaving shamefully and with conduct violating the Islamic teachings." The case started when the Hai'a's staff arrested the man under charges of practicing homosexuality. He was referred to the Bureau for Investigation and Prosecution, which referred him to the District Court.

Even government officials are not immune from criminal sanctions. A gay Saudi diplomat named Ali Ahmad Asseri applied for asylum in the United States after the Saudi government discovered his sexuality.[23]

Recent reports of people being executed for homosexuality often add other charges to the offense, typically theft, rape or murder. For example, a gay Yemeni was executed for homosexuality and murder in 2013.[24]

In 2014, a 24-year-old Saudi Arabian man was sentenced to three years detention and 450 lashes after a Medina court found him guilty of "promoting the vice and practice of homosexuality", after he was caught using Twitter to arrange dates with other men.[25]

In 2019, Saudi Arabia had a mass execution of 37 men who were generally accused of espionage or terrorism for Iran. Five of these men were additionally accused of having had sex with each other.[26]

On 13 October 2019, Saudi authorities arrested a 23-year-old national, Suhail al-Jameel, for posting a picture in of him wearing short shorts at the beach. He is a gay social media personality in Saudi Arabia, who openly documented his sexuality on Snapchat and Twitter. Al-Jameel wrote on Snapchat that he was arrested on the charges of sharing nudity online. Soon after fans started using #freesuhail hashtag on Twitter.[27]

In November 2019, two gay journalists from Saudi Arabia fled their home country, after interrogations and facing threats of being publicly outed. However, the pair was detained in Australia on November 15, while they attempted to seek asylum. The men alleged of being intimidated by guards, threatened with violence by other detainees and witnessing excessive use of drugs among them in the Australian detention centre.[28]
They execute terrorists, Rapists, murderers, molesters.. Some of them may be homosexuals.

KSA is very conservative so there are no public expressions of sexuality even among heterosexual couples.. The law requires 4 witnesses.

Do you think when you read?
 
  • Like
Reactions: Friday13

Rev. Hellh0und

Former Staff
Jul 2011
73,915
15,272
Somewhere below 14th and East.
They execute terrorists, Rapists, murderers, molesters.. Some of them may be homosexuals.

KSA is very conservative so there are no public expressions of sexuality even among heterosexual couples.. The law requires 4 witnesses.

Do you think when you read?





Fuck saudi arabia, fuck the house of saud, fuck oppression.....




get it now?