Poll: 73 Percent Support ‘The Buffett Rule’, Including 66 Percent Of Republicans

jackalope

Former Staff
Jan 2010
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Maine
Poll: 73 Percent Support ‘The Buffett Rule’, Including 66 Percent Of Republicans

Kyle Leighton | September 27, 2011, 3:41PM


Ever since President Barack Obama proposed raising taxes on millionaires as part of a debt reduction package, Republicans have been refining their defense for resisting the change. These are the job creators, they argue, and economic growth will be hampered if they have to pay more income to the government. But it looks like they may have to find something more effective.

In the first public polling available on the so-called "Buffett Rule" specifically -- the proposal to raise taxes on millionaires advocated by billionaire investor Warren Buffett -- Daily Kos/SEIU's weekly "State of the Nation" surveyasked the following: Do you support or oppose ensuring that people who make over a million dollars a year pay the same percentage of taxes or more on their total income as those who make less than a million dollars a year?


The answer wasn't close. 73 percent supported the idea, versus 16 percent who did not, and 11 percent who were unsure. The poll was of 1,000 registered voters.

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Poll: 73 Percent Support 'The Buffett Rule', Including 66 Percent Of Republicans | TPMDC

Sixteen percent think it's a bad idea, and 11 percent aren't sure. What, are they gluttons for punishment? Yes, please let the millionaires pay a lower percentage than me! :burp:
 
Jul 2011
36,165
3,404
Tennessee
i wonder how many of these 1000 people understand why someone making over a million dollars can pay a lower percentage in taxes compared to some who makes less.

my guess is not very many because they will answer the tax rate is TOO low rather than saying it's the tax code that's full of deductions for those who can take advantage of them.
 
Feb 2011
19,049
13,924
The formerly great golden state
i wonder how many of these 1000 people understand why someone making over a million dollars can pay a lower percentage in taxes compared to some who makes less.

my guess is not very many because they will answer the tax rate is TOO low rather than saying it's the tax code that's full of deductions for those who can take advantage of them.
That and the lower rate for capital gains.

Raising the top marginal tax rate probably isn't going to make much of a difference for the super rich.
 
Jul 2011
36,165
3,404
Tennessee
That and the lower rate for capital gains.

Raising the top marginal tax rate probably isn't going to make much of a difference for the super rich.
that too.

it won't, but getting that extra revenue is only going to make a small dent in the deficit problem.
 
Feb 2011
19,049
13,924
The formerly great golden state
that too.

it won't, but getting that extra revenue is only going to make a small dent in the deficit problem.
If it's done right, it could help.

Back in 2000, when the budget kind of sort of balanced if we ignore the money taken from SS, the government's share of the GDP was nearly 21%. Now, it's more like 16%. If we had that extra 5% of the 14 trillion GDP, it would amount to $700 B, or about half of the deficit. Another $700 B in spending cuts should balance the budget.

or pretty close anyhow.

A lot closer than any plan so far proposed by Congress.
 
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jackalope

Former Staff
Jan 2010
51,139
17,672
Maine
i wonder how many of these 1000 people understand why someone making over a million dollars can pay a lower percentage in taxes compared to some who makes less.

my guess is not very many because they will answer the tax rate is TOO low rather than saying it's the tax code that's full of deductions for those who can take advantage of them.

I bet a lot do, and a lot don't. Bottom line: it doesn't matter. It's not right.
 
Jul 2011
36,165
3,404
Tennessee
If it's done right, it could help.

Back in 2000, when the budget kind of sort of balanced if we ignore the money taken from SS, the government's share of the GDP was nearly 21%. Now, it's more like 16%. If we had that extra 5% of the 14 trillion GDP, it would amount to $700 B, or about half of the deficit. Another $700 B in spending cuts should balance the budget.

or pretty close anyhow.

A lot closer than any plan so far proposed by Congress.
our current budget is around 3.5-3.6 trillion, so that percentage is alot higher.

this link is the latest report from the CBO on the federal budget.

http://www.cbo.gov/ftpdocs/124xx/doc12412/2011_09_08_MBR.pdf

977 billion dollars have been paid in individual income tax so far this year with one month left to go in the fisical year. where did you get this 5 percent of GDP from? do you think there's 700 billion dollars to be squezzed out of the rich in a year? i don't.
 
Jul 2011
36,165
3,404
Tennessee
I bet a lot do, and a lot don't. Bottom line: it doesn't matter. It's not right.
there are so many ways to ask a question in order elicit a certain response.

why not ask, do you support the so-called "buffett rule" as proposed by the president?
 

jackalope

Former Staff
Jan 2010
51,139
17,672
Maine
there are so many ways to ask a question in order elicit a certain response.

why not ask, do you support the so-called "buffett rule" as proposed by the president?


Because that would be a loaded question. Generally reputable pollsters avoid that. Some follow up later in the interview and give more information, and ask again, now that I've given you more information on who supports this, do you still support it? Or something of that kind.

Rasmussen specializes in loaded questions. Other pollsters try to avoid them.

I'm sure there will be more polling done. It'll be interesting to see results. I bet Obama's numbers rise as he sells this plan. This is what the people want, and they've been saying so for a long time, in polling. Yes, we want the rich to pay more taxes. No, we don't like all the special loopholes that benefit the few.