Poll: High Rates Of College Students Support Violence, Shouting To Stop Free Speech

Macduff

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Apr 2010
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#1
It’s not just crazy places like the University of California at Berkeley where surprisingly large numbers of U.S. college students believe that violence and shouting are acceptable methods to prevent people from saying things. Fifty-one percent of all U.S. college students believe shouting is an acceptable response to free speech, and one in five (19 percent) believe violence is an acceptable response, according to results from a national survey of 1,500 students in 49 states and DC.
Fifty-three percent of survey respondents said colleges should “create a positive learning environment for all students by prohibiting certain speech or expression of viewpoints that are offensive or biased against certain groups of people” rather than “create an open learning environment where students are exposed to all types of speech and viewpoints, even if it means allowing speech that is offensive or biased against certain groups of people.”
Poll: U.S. Students Support Violence, Shouting To Stop Free Speech
The snowflake mentality is the biggest threat to free speech. Being offended by something doesn't make you a snowflake. Thinking that your being offended means the other person doesn't have their right to speech is what makes you a snowflake.
Today’s college students are tomorrow’s attorneys, teachers, professors, policymakers, legislators, and judges,” writes study author John Villasenor, a professor of law, politics, and technology at the University of California at Los Angeles. “If, for example, a large fraction of college students believe, however incorrectly, that offensive speech is unprotected by the First Amendment, that view will inform the decisions they make as they move into positions of increasing authority later in their careers.”
 

Djinn

Council Hall
Dec 2007
51,652
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Pennsylvania, USA
#2
The article is based on data published here.

@Macduff - Was it your intention to illustrate that Republicans are marginally more likely than Democrats to support acts of violence?

 
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Macduff

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Apr 2010
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#3
The article is based on data published here.

@Macduff - Was it your intention to illustrate that Republicans are marginally more likely than Democrats to support acts of violence?

No, my intent was to illustrate that a disturbing number of college students think that it's acceptable to use violence to prevent someone from speaking. Regardless of party affiliation.
 

Djinn

Council Hall
Dec 2007
51,652
38,457
Pennsylvania, USA
#4
College students - especially first-year college students - are living away from home for the first time in their lives. It's no surprise that they do stupid shit.

And it's no surprise that men who do stupid shit outnumber women who do stupid shit by 3:1.

I freely admit to doing stupid shit while in college - especially during my freshman year.
 
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Macduff

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Apr 2010
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#5
College students - especially first-year college students - are living away from home for the first time in their lives. It's no surprise that they do stupid shit.

And it's no surprise that men who do stupid shit outnumber women who do stupid shit by 3:1.

I freely admit to doing stupid shit while in college - especially during my freshman year.
Further on in the article it explains that these are kids who are completely unfamiliar with the First Amendment. This is something they should learn in high school.
 
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Djinn

Council Hall
Dec 2007
51,652
38,457
Pennsylvania, USA
#6
Further on in the article it explains that these are kids who are completely unfamiliar with the First Amendment. This is something they should learn in high school.
I expect that most of these college students know the First Amendment, and what it states. Most of them have never been in a situation in which it applies to them. It's like reading about war, versus fighting in a war. Sure, you get something from reading about it, but the experience doesn't really translate into experiencing war firsthand.

The issue has more to do with interpretations of the first amendment, such as whether it covers "hate speech." Get a roomful of First Amendment experts in a room, and you won't have a consensus on this issue.
 
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Rorschach

Former Staff
Aug 2012
53,875
20,201
america
#7
Well, Violence IS the Universal Language.

Sure, it may not be the best form of communication to reach consensus and/or compromise, but.....slap someone in the face, and, they know what your intent is.........

Kill them, and, it does not matter if your target "gets the message" or not.

Seems, that the NEXT generation doesn't feel the need for consensus, and compromise, and all that shit.

Many of them seem quite intent on settling their differences in the streets.

We will see how that all works out......
 
Dec 2014
17,093
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The Milky Way
#8
No, they do not "know" the First Amendment, or much else about the Constitution. The K-12 is in meltdown, a deliberate long-term plan since the teachers colleges were taken over by the left. The results are obvious on any number of levels. Thus an increase in private schooling, and home schooling.
 

RNG

Moderator
Jan 2015
14,113
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Left coast
#9
I have heard the argument, and I am somewhat but not totally against it, that shouting down a speaker is in its own way a type of free speech.
 
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Macduff

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Apr 2010
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Pittsburgh, PA
#10
I expect that most of these college students know the First Amendment, and what it states. Most of them have never been in a situation in which it applies to them. It's like reading about war, versus fighting in a war. Sure, you get something from reading about it, but the experience doesn't really translate into experiencing war firsthand.

The issue has more to do with interpretations of the first amendment, such as whether it covers "hate speech." Get a roomful of First Amendment experts in a room, and you won't have a consensus on this issue.
One in five college graduates “cannot name a single right or freedom guaranteed by the First Amendment.”