Reading the Mueller Report

Oct 2018
3,590
4,645
Somewhere they can't find me.
#1
I heard (former Watergate prosecutor) Nick Akerman speak last night. Some interesting takeaways:

1. Akerman believes the House will start impeachment proceedings against Trump before 2020. He maintains that the complexity of the case requires the public to be better educated on the crimes (which include tax evasion) Trump committed before that step is taken. And that it is happening via the ongoing Judiciary Committee's investigations

(TBH, I'm not so sure about that. I don't believe many Americans, especially RW extremists and so-called independents, areinterested or even capable of grasping the complexities involved here.)

2. All of the groundwork for said impeachment hearings is laid out in the Mueller report.

3. Mueller did not find any evidence of conspiracy (in which two or more parties get together to orchestrate a crime) between Russia and the Trump campaign, but there was ample evidence of the campaign possessing stolen property (i.e., DNC and Podesta emails). The reason they were not charged is because, under the Federal statute, it must be tangible property (not digitized information as we have in this case).

4. And, perhaps most disturbing of all, for many of the crimes Trump is alleged to have committed (i.e., fraud, money-laundering and tax evasion), there is a FIVE-YEAR statute of limitations. So, it is indeed possible that he could run out the clock on many of the charges.


I have to confess that while I have skimmed through Mueller's report, I have yet to read all 400-plus pages of it (a task made even more difficult by the fact that I only have a PDF version and need to read it on my computer). And any Trump fanboy/girl who claims to have done so is clearly lying.

But I have decided to steel myself to the task and indeed to post whatever interesting highlights I gleam from it in this thread.

I invite all others to do the same.
 
May 2019
1,199
1,265
midwest
#2
And there is Trump's personal lapdog changing the DOJ regulation in real time. SAD but the Democrats who voted for him to be US AG should be ashamed of themselves.
:cool:


Mueller should follow Barr’s new policy

To be clear, it’s unlikely that Mueller will go into any more detail than he did this week when he finally broke his silence and delivered his first public statement on his two-year investigation. It’s also uncertain whether Mueller is even willing to testify before Congress.

But if Mueller is so committed to following Justice Department guidelines, he should recognize that attorney general William Barr appears to be changing those guidelines in real time to fit whatever narrative Trump is pushing.

And the latest so-called policy from the DOJ, as Maddow pointed out on Thursday, is that it would have been completely appropriate for Mueller to accuse the president of a crime.

more here: Rachel Maddow Says Bill Barr Has Given Mueller A New Opening To Accuse Trump Of Crimes
 
Apr 2012
77,479
5,961
#5
I heard (former Watergate prosecutor) Nick Akerman speak last night. Some interesting takeaways:

1. Akerman believes the House will start impeachment proceedings against Trump before 2020. He maintains that the complexity of the case requires the public to be better educated on the crimes (which include tax evasion) Trump committed before that step is taken. And that it is happening via the ongoing Judiciary Committee's investigations

(TBH, I'm not so sure about that. I don't believe many Americans, especially RW extremists and so-called independents, areinterested or even capable of grasping the complexities involved here.)

2. All of the groundwork for said impeachment hearings is laid out in the Mueller report.

3. Mueller did not find any evidence of conspiracy (in which two or more parties get together to orchestrate a crime) between Russia and the Trump campaign, but there was ample evidence of the campaign possessing stolen property (i.e., DNC and Podesta emails). The reason they were not charged is because, under the Federal statute, it must be tangible property (not digitized information as we have in this case).

4. And, perhaps most disturbing of all, for many of the crimes Trump is alleged to have committed (i.e., fraud, money-laundering and tax evasion), there is a FIVE-YEAR statute of limitations. So, it is indeed possible that he could run out the clock on many of the charges.


I have to confess that while I have skimmed through Mueller's report, I have yet to read all 400-plus pages of it (a task made even more difficult by the fact that I only have a PDF version and need to read it on my computer). And any Trump fanboy/girl who claims to have done so is clearly lying.

But I have decided to steel myself to the task and indeed to post whatever interesting highlights I gleam from it in this thread.

I invite all others to do the same.
More hate Trump rhetoric. Show proof of those crimes
 

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