Realistic Solution to “Background Check” and guns

Jun 2014
49,565
50,529
United States
#21
Just bought a gun from a close friend. No background check. He is a former LEO and has known me for 2 decades. Nothing we did was irresponsible. I’m no felon. He isn’t either. And I got a nice new (nah, not your business what it is). Or my father giving me a (free gun) on “permanent loan” until he needs it (just a hunting weapon that he doesn’t use anymore but I do). No felonies from either of us. Not exactly irresponsible.

This is why background checks are useless. One need not purchase a firearm from a licensed dealer in order to gain access to a gun.
 
Dec 2018
4,949
1,893
Florida
#22
This is why background checks are useless. One need not purchase a firearm from a licensed dealer in order to gain access to a gun.
Prime issue is that I could easily have a straw purchase. I know a dealer who pays really close attention to people who want a specific gun, but don’t know why. Especially once a shady cat has already looked at the piece.
 

Blueneck

Former Staff
Jun 2007
55,162
42,601
Ohio
#23
So I’ve wondered off and on why we don’t require those who cannot legally purchase a firearm to have this notated on their state issued ID. If someone cannot be trusted with a firearm, they cannot be trusted in general society. If someone cannot grasp that murder is not ok? They don’t belong in civilized society. No background check is required by private sellers. Cops also don’t need to run one. If they catch someone with them? Or if someone is caught trying to buy with a state ID (driver’s license or ID card) that shows their rights are revoked? Boom. Prosecution. Easy peasy.

Can someone please let me know why this is not an acceptable process?
Well for one thing it gives anyone who sees your ID the impression that you might be a convicted felon or be psychotic when that may not be the case. Does the cashier at Kroger need to know this just because you wrote a check?
 

Ian Jeffrey

Council Hall
Mar 2013
76,764
46,009
Vulcan, down the street from Darth Vader
#24
Problem with your suggestion is that DLs are usually good for several years, so any crime done in the interim which would invalidate right to buy guns would not show up.
Sure, but you can make a condition of probation requiring the person to trade out his DL for one with the proper indicator, or rendering the DL invalid unless traded out in the meantime. A simple traffic violation would result in a confiscated license and a probation violation (whether the PV is punished, or whether probation is revoked entirely).

As it is, in my state a person convicted of a misdemeanor cannot hold a CHL (concealed handgun license) for X years after conviction, and so is required to turn in his CHL (for a receipt) until X years expire, at which point he can apply for a reinstatement.

Anyway, point being ... there are administrative ways to handle this.
 

Ian Jeffrey

Council Hall
Mar 2013
76,764
46,009
Vulcan, down the street from Darth Vader
#25
Someone who decides to commit a felony does not deserve to be treated as an equal citizen. They have shown a flagrant disregard for our laws in a civilized society. They broke the social contract. There are consequences for that. One of those should be reduced participation in the social contract.
That need not, however, result in permanent disenfranchisement. Certainly, an imprisoned felon should not be able to vote while inside, but after that it should depend on the crime whether the right to vote is automatically restored, is restorable after petition, or is not restorable. There is a substantial difference between, say, possession of (a usable quantity of) cocaine and murder.
A felony is a much more heinous crime than a basic misdemeanor. It doesn’t happen by accident.
Actually, there often is very little difference, and they can happen by accident.
 
Likes: NightSwimmer
Jul 2016
7,143
6,290
Florida
#26
Is it legal to sell a gun to a felon?
In some states, maybe; but that's not my point.

They may be selling them to felons, they may be selling them to people who don't want to go through a waiting period. Everyone selling or buying a gun should be licensed. And insured.
 
Jun 2014
49,565
50,529
United States
#27
In some states, maybe; but that's not my point.

They may be selling them to felons, they may be selling them to people who don't want to go through a waiting period. Everyone selling or buying a gun should be licensed. And insured.

It's not really feasible to enforce such a limit on gun sales. Nor is it feasible to blacklist everyone who should not be allowed the right of gun ownership. At least, not prior to them having committed a violent gun related crime.
 
Nov 2006
54,624
20,476
#28
I doubt you understand it then.



“I’d like to buy a gun.”

“Let me see your ID.”

Btw. Background checks do happen at gun shows. Have you ever been to one?
Bullshit. A full 50 state wants and warrants as well as criminal history?



No. It shouldn’t. And a background check could happen if it were free. But the same people who vote to restore a felon’s right to vote (liberal morons), also don’t want people to have free access to background check systems. And what is the point of a background check when someone who commits a crime has a license marked that shows they cannot purchase?
Noone said it had to be free and only a licensed firearm dealer should be able to request one. you want to sell a gun to your neighbor, take it to a dealer and he conducts the sale and check for a fee.

Note you didn’t actually address my suggestion. You just said “that’s dumb.” Then brought up situations where it would actually make it easier for me as a private citizen to check. Because end of day there are no “loopholes.” Felons are not allowed to purchase firearms. Period.
Private citizens don't have to check jack shit and can't even conduct a background check. Name one mass shooter that your silly method would have stopped.
 
Nov 2006
54,624
20,476
#29
It's not really feasible to enforce such a limit on gun sales. Nor is it feasible to blacklist everyone who should not be allowed the right of gun ownership. At least, not prior to them having committed a violent gun related crime.
I bet a couple mass shootings every day might make it feasible.
 
Jun 2014
49,565
50,529
United States
#30
I bet a couple mass shootings every day might make it feasible.

Hasn't yet. At any rate, background checks will never cut it when it comes to reducing gun violence. That's just the Congress having done something to be "doing something".

It'll take far more than background checks to make a difference.
 

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