Reeling progressives meet behind closed doors over Medicare for all

Mar 2012
60,804
42,094
New Hampshire
Medicare for All has taken a beating lately.

Its two biggest proponents in the presidential field, Bernie Sanders and Elizabeth Warren, have come under sustained attack from centrist Democrats over the issue. The health care industry is spending millions to sow opposition. And polls show it’s taking a toll: Support for single-payer has slipped in some recent surveys, as has Warren's standing in the primary after spending weeks on the defensive over it.

Now, leaders of the left — suddenly reeling after seeing the Democratic health care debate shift dramatically in their direction the past few years — are strategizing on how to retake the offensive. At a closed-door meeting Tuesday, Congressional Progressive Caucus leader Rep. Pramila Jayapal (D-Wash.) had a message for her fellow supporters of Medicare for All: Unite against the moderates and don’t fight about whether Warren’s plan is too mild compared to Sanders’.

Warren has done a delicate dance on the issue over the past month, releasing a detailed financing plan that she said would avoid middle-class tax hikes, then following up with a two-stage transition plan in a nod to those concerned about upheaval in the health care system. Though some established Democratic strategists said Warren's plans could give her more flexibility in a general election — by initially passing a robust public option and then trying passing a full single payer bill later in her term — some progressives saw the maneuvering as too clever by half.

But Jayapal and other people at the meeting said sniping at Warren will only hurt the cause. The polling session and Jayapal’s meeting Tuesday were two of several moves by the left in recent weeks to try to regain the offensive in the battle over Medicare for All. The enemy here is not one or the other of them,” Jayapal said of Sanders and Warren. “It is the entrenched interests, and the groups that are rallying around them, including some of our Democratic presidential candidates who are really doing a disservice to the American people.”

 
Sep 2013
49,094
41,072
On a hill
I would imagine insurance companies are in a panic about giving up their cash cow - and not just health insurance providers either.
 
Mar 2012
60,804
42,094
New Hampshire
I would imagine insurance companies are in a panic about giving up their cash cow - and not just health insurance providers either.
I can also tell you that here in New England the big insurers in Connecticut are running full page ads in all the newspapers about how big a loss this would be to the area in terms of job loss. "Send New England into a deep recession for decades" is some of the titles of the ads. It seems to be making people wonder.
 
Sep 2013
49,094
41,072
On a hill
I can also tell you that here in New England the big insurers in Connecticut are running full page ads in all the newspapers about how big a loss this would be to the area in terms of job loss. "Send New England into a deep recession for decades" is some of the titles of the ads. It seems to be making people wonder.
I have no doubt.

CVS Health, which bought Aetna late last year, paid CEO Larry Merlo $21.9 million in 2018, an increase of 79% over the year before. Merlo's realized compensation dropped to $15.5 million from $26.7 million the year before largely because he did not exercise any stock options last year.

Merlo makes about 618 times the median employee salary at CVS, according to the company's definitive proxy statement.

 
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Mar 2012
60,804
42,094
New Hampshire
I have no doubt.
Some back in 2010 or so after the ACA passed, predicted that would incredibly strengthen the health insurance industry and that at some point they would be more powerful than the defense lobby. That day is here. Even doctors are saying no.
 
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Sep 2013
49,094
41,072
On a hill
Some back in 2010 or so after the ACA passed, predicted that would incredibly strengthen the health insurance industry and that at some point they would be more powerful than the defense lobby. That day is here. Even doctors are saying no.
Insurance providers are also driving doctors out of medicine.

...doctors are so fed up with the constant headaches caused by insurers, two-thirds would recommend against pursuing a career in medicine, and nearly half (48%) are considering a career change altogether.

studyfinds.org/survey-half-doctors-consider-leaving-medicine-insurance-company-headaches/
 
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Mar 2012
60,804
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New Hampshire
Insurance providers are also driving doctors out of medicine.
I dont know how true it is, but I read that newer doctors that arent specialists are more in favor of MFA whereas older specialists arent at all.
 

CtC

Mar 2019
14,626
5,288
California
Medicare for All has taken a beating lately.

Its two biggest proponents in the presidential field, Bernie Sanders and Elizabeth Warren, have come under sustained attack from centrist Democrats over the issue. The health care industry is spending millions to sow opposition. And polls show it’s taking a toll: Support for single-payer has slipped in some recent surveys, as has Warren's standing in the primary after spending weeks on the defensive over it.

Now, leaders of the left — suddenly reeling after seeing the Democratic health care debate shift dramatically in their direction the past few years — are strategizing on how to retake the offensive. At a closed-door meeting Tuesday, Congressional Progressive Caucus leader Rep. Pramila Jayapal (D-Wash.) had a message for her fellow supporters of Medicare for All: Unite against the moderates and don’t fight about whether Warren’s plan is too mild compared to Sanders’.

Warren has done a delicate dance on the issue over the past month, releasing a detailed financing plan that she said would avoid middle-class tax hikes, then following up with a two-stage transition plan in a nod to those concerned about upheaval in the health care system. Though some established Democratic strategists said Warren's plans could give her more flexibility in a general election — by initially passing a robust public option and then trying passing a full single payer bill later in her term — some progressives saw the maneuvering as too clever by half.

But Jayapal and other people at the meeting said sniping at Warren will only hurt the cause. The polling session and Jayapal’s meeting Tuesday were two of several moves by the left in recent weeks to try to regain the offensive in the battle over Medicare for All. The enemy here is not one or the other of them,” Jayapal said of Sanders and Warren. “It is the entrenched interests, and the groups that are rallying around them, including some of our Democratic presidential candidates who are really doing a disservice to the American people.”

Since the idea sucks ,is it any wonder? I will keep saying this. 180 MILLION Americans have good coverage. Think they want to give that up just to wait in line for Sub-Standard Gov't HC?
 

Jets

Former Staff
Feb 2011
24,071
15,227
New York
The insurance lobby holds too much sway over our elected reps for MFA to have a chance.
 
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Sep 2013
49,094
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On a hill
I dont know how true it is, but I read that newer doctors that arent specialists are more in favor of MFA whereas older specialists arent at all.
If young doctors keep dropping out, who will replace the older doctors as they retire?

Doctor burnout is costing the U.S. health care system a lot — roughly $4.6 billion a year, according to a study published this week in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

"Everybody who goes into medicine knows that it's a stressful career and that it's a lot of hard work," says Lotte Dyrbye, a physician and professor of medicine at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., who co-authored the study.

She says the medical profession now carries an increasing load of paperwork and bureaucracy, adding stress to doctor's lives. "We want to be able to deliver good quality care to our patients, and our systems get in the way," Dyrbye says.