Rooting for Mother Teresa

Nov 2010
17,522
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Jefferson State
#11
If memory serves me right, "sainthood" is a church-sanctioned confirmation that an individual's soul is indisputably in heaven.
Yes, you're probably right in relation to Mother Teresa. I've been trying to expand the discussion of "sainthood" to include holy beings in other religions as well as Christianity.
 
Nov 2008
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Washington state
#12
It seems to all hedge on documented "miracles" that people claim her intercession was responsible for. "Sainthood" in Catholicism has definitions. I have no idea why pope John the 23rd would be sanctified first. Maybe because his death preceded Mother Theresa's?

There are saints in many religious traditions.

I think the topic of sainthood is an interesting one that I'd prefer we study ecumenically, rather than just looking at Christian saints.

Buddhist saints are not well known by Westerners. Neither are Hindu saints, nor Muslim ones.

I feel as though I have a connection with a number of saints in different religious traditions. One of the saints that I've known in my lifetime is Anandamayi Ma. I never met her in person, but she appeared in a dream in my first Buddhist ten day meditation retreat.
This is a thread about Mother Theresa. Here is part of the criteria for a Catholic to be a saint . "Saint" (contracted "St" or "S.") To be canonized a saint, at least two miracles must have been performed through the saint's intercession after his or her death (i.e., an additional miracle after that granting beatification). Canonization is a statement by the church that the person certainly enjoys the Beatific Vision. The saint is assigned a feast day which may be celebrated anywhere within the Catholic Church, although it may or may not appear on the general calendar or local calendars as an obligatory feast, parish churches may be built in his or her honor, and the faithful may freely and without restriction celebrate and honor the saint. Read more here. Canonization - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct...meijWkiMXYCKMi0XQ&sig2=mXvrt-FynjQeOpcWZUNlEw
 
Nov 2008
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#13
Mother Teresa according to most accounts was a woman with a disturbed mind, who frequently was unsure about the existance of god. Hitchens (RIP) did a great expose/documentary on the life of Mother Teresa called [correction: Hell's Angel] 'Devil's Angel', which described how she was the poster girl for the Catholic church, who reveled in attention. She turned a blind eye to the massacres in South America, and did photo ops with dictators.

Her home of the dying in India was described by one former worker there as looking like a concentration camp. Hardly someone who did miracles, or helped the sick, suffering in her eyes meant people went to heaven i.e. cult of suffering. Relatives couldn't visit, the 'patients' lay in the hot air, she didn't use sterile needles, and she refused to send her 'patients' to hospitals even if the local hospital could cure them.

Hitchens put it down to the church desperately wanting to create more saints, as to sidetrack believers from the pedophile priest scandals, as a reason why they made her a saint.
Have a link to support your claims?
 
Nov 2008
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#14
You know I'm very ambivalent about "sainthood". I know a number of Buddhist teachers who are considered to have a high level of "realization" and many wooo woo things are attributed to them. I've even myself experienced the phenomena that occur around such "saints".

What impresses me more, is when people are genuinely kind to all, and naturally humble without contrivance.
Are their Buddhist Saints and what criteria to they have to become one?
 
Nov 2010
17,522
7,306
Jefferson State
#15
Are their Buddhist Saints and what criteria to they have to become one?
Oh, pretty high standards. Achieving "rainbow body", for example. (Which is the phenomena of your dissolving into light after you die). Or seeing the images of deities on the bones post cremation. Or dying and coming back to life as in the case of "delogs".

We'd call these the "attainment of siddhis". The most extraordinary siddhi is complete enlightenment.

I have seen the bones of Tang Tong Gyalpo. Very clearly, the image of the thousand armed Chenresi is evident. That was his main meditation practice.

Imagine being that one pointed on compassion that even your bones reflect it.

The heart of the Karmapa remained intact and unburned after his cremation.
 
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Nov 2010
17,522
7,306
Jefferson State
#16
The patron saint of Tibet is Padmasambhava, eighth century arhat who brought Buddhism to Tibet from India. The legends about him are vast.

A prophet, (among other things) he predicted that Buddhism would go to the West, "when the iron bird flies". He also foretold of the fall of Tibet, and the destruction of the monasteries. He preserved many of the most sacred teachings by hiding them in places that could only be revealed by reborn Buddhist masters. Those who reveal these teachings are called "tertons". I have met a few of them myself.

"ter" is the Tibetan word for treasure, and tertons are considered "treasure revealers". The stories of how the treasures of the dharma are found are pretty remarkable in themselves.

Another category of special beings in Buddhism include the "tulkus" reborn masters of awareness. HH the Dalai Lama is the most famous one known to westerners. He is considered the 14th in his line. I have met a number of tulkus. They are like spiritual savants. Extremely gifted meditators.

The head of the lineage that I practice happens to be a tulku. He is first in this list:

Chagdud Tulku Rinpoche • Chögyam Trungpa Rinpoche • Chökyi Nyima Rinpoche • Deshung Rinpoche • Dilgo Khyentse Rinpoche • Drubwang Tsoknyi Rinpoche • Dudjom Rinpoche • Dzigar Kongtrul Rinpoche • The Dzogchen Pönlop Rinpoche • Dzongsar Khyentse Rinpoche • Gen Lamrimpa • The Third Jamgön Kongtrul Rinpoche • Kalu Rinpoche • Venerable Khandro Rinpoche • Khenpo Könchog Gyaltsen • Khenpo Tsultrim Gyamtso Rinpoche • Lama Lodö • Lama Thubten Yeshe Rinpoche • Namkhai Norbu Rinpoche • Nyoshul Khenpo Rinpoche • Ringu Tulku Rinpoche • Sakyong Mipham Rinpoche • Sogyal Rinpoche • Tarthang Tulku Rinpoche • Thinley Norbu Rinpoche • Thrangu Rinpoche • Traleg Kyabgon Rinpoche • Tulku Thondup Rinpoche • Tulku Urgyen Rinpoche • Lama Zopa Rinpoche

The one I studied the most with is Chagdud Tulku Rinpoche. I also met and studied with Lama Zopa Rinpoche, Sogyal Rinpoche, Lama Lodo, Chogyam Trunpa Rinpoche, and Kalu Rinpoche.
 
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Nov 2008
63,493
4,948
Washington state
#17
Oh, pretty high standards. Achieving "rainbow body", for example. (Which is the phenomena of your dissolving into light after you die). Or seeing the images of deities on the bones post cremation. Or dying and coming back to life as in the case of "delogs".

We'd call these the "attainment of siddhis". The most extraordinary siddhi is complete enlightenment.

I have seen the bones of Tang Tong Gyalpo. Very clearly, the image of the thousand armed Chenresi is evident. That was his main meditation practice.

Imagine being that one pointed on compassion that even your bones reflect it.

The heart of the Karmapa remained intact and unburned after his cremation.
You speak of what they become in a spiritual sense, but are their Buddhist that do things like Mother Theresa caring for the sick doing things for others.
 
Nov 2010
17,522
7,306
Jefferson State
#18
You speak of what they become in a spiritual sense, but are their Buddhist that do things like Mother Theresa caring for the sick doing things for others.
Of course. They just don't think it's any big deal.

The Buddhist Compassion Relief Tzu Chi Foundation was founded in Taiwan in 1966 by a Buddhist nun, Dharma Master Cheng Yen. The Foundation is a non-profit organization that helps the poor and needy. Over the last 40 years, they have provided food, clothing, disaster relief, medical care, vocational training and education for hundreds of thousands of individuals. They have also built schools, hospitals and research centers.

Although the work of the foundation began in Taiwan, it now has branches all over the world. The organization is based on the values of Humanistic Buddhism, which stresses the integration of people's spiritual practices into their every day life. Unlike Christianity, which stresses the life hereafter, Humanistic Buddhism stresses the life now, and how you can use that life to help others.

The founder, Master Cheng Yen, is a Buddhist nun. In 1966, she founded the Tzu Chi Foundation after she witnessed the devastating poverty experienced by many Taiwanese people. She persuaded 30 housewives to form a group and to save 50 cents a day from their housekeeping money. This money was then used to help the poor. In one year, these 30 housewives helped 15 families. The foundation grew from there to its present size of more than 5 million supporters and 30,000 trained volunteers.

The Tzu Chi organization however does not accept donations of food or clothing from the community for the nun's use. Instead, they support themselves by making and selling candles, health powder and growing their own food and sewing their own robes. Even when Master Cheng Yen had a building built for her home, she did not take any money from the organization. Instead, she took out a bank loan and paid it herself.

http://voices.yahoo.com/the-little-buddhist-nun-big-hospital-628431.html?cat=70
 
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Nov 2008
63,493
4,948
Washington state
#19
Of course. They just don't think it's any big deal.

The Buddhist Compassion Relief Tzu Chi Foundation was founded in Taiwan in 1966 by a Buddhist nun, Dharma Master Cheng Yen. The Foundation is a non-profit organization that helps the poor and needy. Over the last 40 years, they have provided food, clothing, disaster relief, medical care, vocational training and education for hundreds of thousands of individuals. They have also built schools, hospitals and research centers.
Although the work of the foundation began in Taiwan, it now has branches all over the world. The organization is based on the values of Humanistic Buddhism, which stresses the integration of people's spiritual practices into their every day life. Unlike Christianity, which stresses the life hereafter, Humanistic Buddhism stresses the life now, and how you can use that life to help others.

The founder, Master Cheng Yen, is a Buddhist nun. In 1966, she founded the Tzu Chi Foundation after she witnessed the devastating poverty experienced by many Taiwanese people. She persuaded 30 housewives to form a group and to save 50 cents a day from their housekeeping money. This money was then used to help the poor. In one year, these 30 housewives helped 15 families. The foundation grew from there to its present size of more than 5 million supporters and 30,000 trained volunteers.

The Tzu Chi organization however does not accept donations of food or clothing from the community for the nun's use. Instead, they support themselves by making and selling candles, health powder and growing their own food and sewing their own robes. Even when Master Cheng Yen had a building built for her home, she did not take any money from the organization. Instead, she took out a bank loan and paid it herself.

The Little Buddhist Nun and the Big Hospital - Yahoo! Voices - voices.yahoo.com
sounds like Buddhist do a lot of good things for people. Don't hear about them much in the news , just curious.
 
Nov 2010
17,522
7,306
Jefferson State
#20
sounds like Buddhist do a lot of good things for people. Don't hear about them much in the news , just curious.
We don't publicity seek. In fact, we usually go out of our way to not be recognized. One small example. We don't take the tax breaks that we're entitled to because we want the community to share in our wealth.

I only "accidentally" learned that when I volunteered to do some filing in the office.
 

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