Russian "Ultras" brawl in Spain, cop dead

The Man

Former Staff
Jul 2011
47,882
35,475
Toronto


A police officer has died during a street battle involving ultras from Spartak Moscow.

There was a fear that ultras arriving from Moscow for Thursday night's Europa League match between Athletic Club and Spartak might cause some trouble in Bilbao and this has proven to be the case.

A group of around 200 Russian fans arrived at the stadium in the hours before the match and glasses and flares were thrown in a scuffle between Spartak and Athletic supporters.

The Ertzaintza - the local Basque police force - were able to get in the middle of it, although they struggled to bring the disturbance to a halt and one officer suffered a cardiac arrest.

The officer was rushed to the Basurto Hospital, but sadly passed away.

At least five arrests have been made.
Police officer dies in Bilbao during street battle with Spartak ultras

A battle between rival fans in Bilbao prior to Thursday night's Europa League meeting between Athletic Bilbao and Spartak Moscow has led to the death of a police officer.

Supporters of the two clubs fought in the streets around the Basque club's San Mames stadium, in the hours building up to their second leg meeting.

Athletic had emerged victorious in the first leg in Russia last week, running out 3-1 winners in Moscow, but there had been a number of warnings in the lead up to the second leg of potential trouble involving Russian Ultras.

Rival hooligans fought in the streets in the hours leading up to kickoff.

Immediate reports from Spain declared five people were taken to the Basurto University hospital, before it was announced at 10pm local time that a member of the Ertzaintza - the Basque civilian police - had lost his life.
Police officer dies after clash between rival supporters ahead of Europa League meeting between Athletic Bilbao and Spartak Moscow

The Russians marching to the stadium


Police outside the stadium


One of the Russians confronts a policeman


More pics at linked article above.

Spartak hooligans are the worst of the worst, even in Russia, even other Russian hooligan clubs don't like them. Wherever those guys go, there is mayhem and violence...

They start fucking riots in the stadiums



And, a lot of them are neo Nazis and white supremacists too



In Moscow and other cities they often beat up non-white/Slavic people they encounter while marching to stadiums, and pogrom minority owned businesses...

I thought, after Marseille, Russian authorities weren't gonna let these savages outside the country anymore... Guess not. Again have to wonder how they will control these guys during the World Cup...
 
Last edited:
  • Like
Reactions: 3 people

The Man

Former Staff
Jul 2011
47,882
35,475
Toronto
Damn. They are pretty rough for sports fans.
Fans are fans. HOOLIGANS are a whole other matter. Those guys just come to the stadium not to see the game, but to stir up trouble and start fights, pretty much...

"The Russian ultras should never have been allowed to travel to Bilbao. Some of them will be known to the authorities and that reason alone, it's not surprising that we have witnessed trouble. To cap it all, the worst thing possible has happened, because a life has been lost and that is beyond repair".

Tebas recalled that: "The most serious, recent cases of violence have happened in European competition; in Spain, we have these issues under control but it's when ultras travel to other countries that these barbarians become even more violent".
Tebas: "It's crazy; the Russian ultras should never have been allowed to travel"

Exactly. Why let them in???

Even the British hools are saints compared to the Russians.

In Russia, normal people don't even go to soccer stadiums anymore...

See:
http://politicalhotwire.com/world-politics/183505-russian-nazi-role-model-germans.html
http://politicalhotwire.com/world-politics/183931-wc2018-riskiest-matches.html
 
  • Like
Reactions: 1 person

The Man

Former Staff
Jul 2011
47,882
35,475
Toronto
Holy shit:

English hooligans will be targeted this summer as part of a combined approach from Russian and South American ultras who met up in Buenos Aires.

A delegation of Russian ultras was in Buenos Aires on January 31 to meet with several groups of 'barras bravas' with a plan to join forces for World Cup 2018 in Russia.

Ultras from Russia and Argentina unite


Of the 10 radical Russian fans, seven belong to Zenit St. Petersburg and three to Dinamo Moscow. Their intention is to combine efforts with the Argentine groups and together launch attacks on visiting English hooligans this summer.

Memories of the violent scenes of the Russian fans against the English in the last European Championships in France have not been forgotten, with street lynchings in the streets of Marseille and incidents inside the stadium getting plenty of media attention. Security forces are on high alert.

The first meeting of the Russians was with Rafael Di Zeo, the leader of 'La 12', the Boca Juniors barra brava. The search for collaborators then involved those ultras from San Lorenzo, Vélez Sarsfield and Nueva Chicago.

In these discussions it has been reported that the Russians reached an agreement to arrange accommodation for the Argentinian groups, as well as transport and defense lawyers, in case they may need them. The Russians and Argentinians want to put together a strategic plan to go up against the English. In terms of locations, the English team will be based in St. Petersburg while Argentina will be in Moscow, where the "barra bravas" (the name for organised groups of supporters of football teams in Latin America) will have the support of the Dinamo fans.

England, Argentina and Russia have avoided each other in the group stage, but there is a potential hot spot in the schedule, the city of Novogorov, where Argentina face Croatia on June 21 and three days later England will play against Panama.

Fake cards led to government discovery

The groups were discovered by Tribuna Segura, a unit created by the Ministry of Security of the Government of Argentina. Their aim: to improve security in Argentine football, and the identification of the Russians was when they tried to enter La Bombonera (the common name used for the home of Boca Juniors, formally known as Estadio Alberto J. Armando) with fake cards.

As soon as Tribuna Segura made it public, Argentinian media jumped on the story. The reports suggest that 280 barras will travel to Russia with entry and accommodation arranged. About 90 of these will be from La 12.
Russian ultras and 'barras bravas' plan World Cup violence strategy

Oh, boy... I feel less and less happy about this upcoming World Cup...

I recall December 2010, when the authorities in Moscow indeed lost control when, after one of their own was killed in a brawl with young men from Kabardino-Balkaria, a Muslim republic in Northern Caucasus, soccer hooligans, mainly from aforementioned Spartak, led retaliatory riots and swarming attacks all over central Moscow, in which, by some estimates, two dozen mainly Caucasian and Central Asia minority citizens and residents were murdered by their mobs, brutally beaten and stabbed to death, lynched, pretty much, and many others injured

The authorities had to urgently fly in thousands and thousands of security forces from various other regions, to back up the police in Moscow and restore order...

Supposedly, they learned from that and are much better prepared now...

I hope so.
 
  • Like
Reactions: 1 person
May 2016
4,154
1,095
california
These kind of guys are probably why governments around the world collect and send them off to other countries, either for armies or immigration.
 
  • Like
Reactions: 1 person

The Man

Former Staff
Jul 2011
47,882
35,475
Toronto
These kind of guys are probably why governments around the world collect and send them off to other countries, either for armies or immigration.
In Ukraine, they were a big part in overthrowing the government on Maidan. And plenty now fighting each other in the Donbass too...
 
  • Like
Reactions: 1 person

The Man

Former Staff
Jul 2011
47,882
35,475
Toronto
Britain’s most senior football police officer on Friday night admitted fears about England fans falling prey to Russian hooligans at the World Cup had been compounded after a policeman died during a riot before Spartak Moscow’s Europa League match at Athletic Bilbao.

Deputy chief constable Mark Roberts, the National Police Chiefs’ Council national footballing police lead, condemned the violence which saw Inocencio Arias García suffer a heart attack after a flare was thrown in his direction during clashes between rival supporters on Thursday night.

Spartak fans were also involved in the brutal attack that injured 35 England supporters and left two fighting for their lives ahead of the country’s 2016 European Championship opener against Russia, which finally led to an arrest of a man travelling from Moscow to Thursday’s game.

Roberts, who co-ordinated Britain’s policing operation at Euro 2016 and will do so again at the World Cup, told Telegraph Sport: “We have an ongoing dialogue with the Russian police and will seek their views on how Thursday night’s events may influence their approach.

“Our thoughts are, of course, with the family, friends and colleagues of the Basque officer. Scenes such as last night have no place in society, let alone football.

“This will, of course, cause concern for those England fans planning to travel to the World Cup and the behaviour of Russian fans needs to be a factor in deciding whether to go there or not.”

Roberts, who after England qualified in October warned fans travelling to Russia they were in danger of being subjected to an “extreme level of violence”, spoke out after Fifa on Thursday proclaimed its “complete trust” in the security arrangements for the tournament.

A spokesman said: “First of all, Fifa deeply regrets the passing of the policeman and our thoughts are with his family. As stated many times, we fully condemn any form of violence.

“As far as security for the 2018 Fifa World Cup is concerned, Fifa has complete trust in the security arrangements and comprehensive security concept developed by the Russian authorities and the Local Organising Committee.

“As demonstrated during the Fifa Confederations Cup last year, Russia’s already-high security standards have been adapted to meet the specific needs of such major sporting events.

“Naturally, Fifa is also in constant contact with all stakeholders regarding the ongoing risk assessment, which enables the implementation of overall preventive measures in cooperation with national and international enforcement authorities.”

Europa League-organisers Uefa, which threatened to throw both England and Russia out of Euro 2016 over the behaviour of their fans, also condemned Thursday’s riot and sent its condolences to the family and colleagues of the police officer who died.

It added: “We are in contact with local authorities to obtain further information on these incidents.”

The Royal Spanish Football Federation, which called for a minute’s silence to be held before all matches in Spain this weekend in memory of García, claimed in a statement the flare had been thrown by a Russian fan.

It added: “The Royal Spanish Football Federation wants to express its most resounding condemnation of all kinds of violent demonstrations by groups of fans who use sporting events to provoke incidents and riots.”
National police chief admits fears over England fans' safety at Russia World Cup increased after death of Spanish policeman following clashes in Bilbao

To be fair, Russian OMON anti-riot units are a bit different from any Spanish or British or other European police; they are used to dealing with the hools, have little patience for them, and those who mess with them get their asses kicked very fast and very brutally...
[video=youtube;3YMDqw-Sx5w]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3YMDqw-Sx5w[/video]
:D

Still, from what I understand, they will concentrate most of their forces in and around the stadiums and also the transportation hubs, the railway terminals and airports. Perhaps some will also be posted near the hotels where the foreigners will stay.

But, the hooligans do their brawls and mayhem all over the place. Back in 2007, for example, when English hools were in Moscow for Manchester United, I believe it was, versus Spartak game, a lot of fighting between them and the locals ("fighting" is a loose term here, with Russians basically just swarming the poor English sods fucking ten, fifteen on one and stomping them down... But, the English, apparently, do that to visitors on their own home soil too, so, it's all fair, I guess...) was on board the Metro trains underground

Though some local hooligans even stormed the Brits' hotel at one point... lol It was pretty wild, so I am told...

Point is, again, I hope nothing gets out of hand, and it will be a nice, safe WC. But, it is Russia, and I have no illusions...
 
  • Like
Reactions: 1 person