SAT adds adversity score to take students hardship into account

Mar 2012
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#1
The nonprofit group that administers the SAT said Thursday it will assign a score to students who take the test to reflect their social and economic backgrounds.

The College Board said it would implement what it calls the "Environmental Context Dashboard," which would measure factors like the crime rate and poverty levels of a student's neighborhood, to better capture their "resourcefulness to overcome challenges and achieve more with less."

"There is talent and potential waiting to be discovered in every community -- the children of poor rural families, kids navigating the challenges of life in the inner city, and military dependents who face the daily difficulties of low income and frequent deployments as part of their family's service to our country," David Coleman, chief executive officer of the College Board said in a statement sent to CNN.

Students are scored on a scale of 1 to 100 based on data from records like the US census and the National Center for Education Statistics. According to the College Board, a score of 50 would be considered average, while a number above 50 indicates more hardship.

It focuses on factors like their high school's average senior class size, percentage of students eligible for free and reduce lunches and academic achievement in Advanced Placement classes. A student's environment at home and in his or her neighborhood, like the crime level, the median family income and family stability, will be factors as well.

SAT will assign a new score that factors in where you live and the crime level in your neighborhood - CNN
 

HCProf

Moderator
Sep 2014
27,853
17,077
USA
#3
The nonprofit group that administers the SAT said Thursday it will assign a score to students who take the test to reflect their social and economic backgrounds.

The College Board said it would implement what it calls the "Environmental Context Dashboard," which would measure factors like the crime rate and poverty levels of a student's neighborhood, to better capture their "resourcefulness to overcome challenges and achieve more with less."

"There is talent and potential waiting to be discovered in every community -- the children of poor rural families, kids navigating the challenges of life in the inner city, and military dependents who face the daily difficulties of low income and frequent deployments as part of their family's service to our country," David Coleman, chief executive officer of the College Board said in a statement sent to CNN.

Students are scored on a scale of 1 to 100 based on data from records like the US census and the National Center for Education Statistics. According to the College Board, a score of 50 would be considered average, while a number above 50 indicates more hardship.

It focuses on factors like their high school's average senior class size, percentage of students eligible for free and reduce lunches and academic achievement in Advanced Placement classes. A student's environment at home and in his or her neighborhood, like the crime level, the median family income and family stability, will be factors as well.

SAT will assign a new score that factors in where you live and the crime level in your neighborhood - CNN
I think this is fair. Teens can be under a lot of stress in the home. One home event that affects a students performance is when there is a divorce going on in the home. Another, the loss of a loved one. I had a HS student who lost her Mom her first year and she completely changed. It is hard to learn when you are distracted.
 
Likes: HayJenn
Dec 2014
16,182
5,678
The Milky Way
#4
LOL More of the same insanity that already has wrecked colleges since the 1960's (bachelor degrees are a laugh since the 1980's). The left runs most colleges, they are a fetid swamp now, so the answer is more swamp.
 

HayJenn

Moderator
Jul 2014
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CA
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I think this is fair. Teens can be under a lot of stress in the home. One home event that affects a students performance is when there is a divorce going on in the home. Another, the loss of a loved one. I had a HS student who lost her Mom her first year and she completely changed. It is hard to learn when you are distracted.
Some top colleges are just getting rid of the SAT, or dropping the essay part.

But for sure you are "on" to something


The University of Chicago’s decision, however, is controversial, raising questions about the efficacy and value of standardized tests. Supporters argue these tests provide colleges with a consistent way to evaluate students’ merit, whereas GPAs may be inflated due to school districts’ varying grading policies. Critics contend test scores correlate with one’s socioeconomic background, thus contributing to diversity gaps on university campuses. In an effort to address such criticism, David Coleman, president of the College Board, “redesigned and improved the SAT” in 2016 to be “affordable, relevant,” and transparent. Aiming to measure core skills taught in school—reading charts, analyzing evidence, and applying algebra—the redesigned test, according to Coleman, is a departure from the old SAT’s tricky “brain teasers.”

Despite these changes, studies continue to reveal inequity in student test scores. Tracking 956,000 students across twenty-eight test-optional institutes, Steve Syverson, assistant vice chancellor at the University of Washington Bothell, notes in his 2018 study that tests are an obstacle for underserved, underrepresented students, with scores relating directly to family income. SAT preparation at popular centers, for example, starts at about $750 for eighteen hours of classes. Similarly, data released in 2017 reveal that SAT and ACT performance gaps remain based on race, ethnicity, and income.


Test-optional schools, however, enroll more minority students. One study, conducted by William Hiss, former dean of admissions at Bates College, shows that test-optional schools increase their enrollment of underrepresented minorities by an average six to eighteen percent. Another study’sfindings corroborated Hiss’s research. Analyzing over a million students, the study reveals that two-thirds of test-optional colleges attracted and enrolled more diverse applicants.

The University of Chicago’s decision to eliminate standardized testing requirements reflects then a commitment to provide educational opportunities for all students. The decision will, as John W. Boyer, Dean of the College at the University of Chicago, states, “empower historically underrepresented communities in the highly selective admissions process.”

Action Network » Why Are Some Colleges and Universities Dropping the SAT/ACT?
 

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