Saudi Arabia's Night of Long Knives

The Man

Former Staff
Jul 2011
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Yeah Prince Kushner meeting with Prince MBS right before the purge is horrible optics. Middle Eastern media is already full of rumors; Kush gave MBS intel that a coup was imminent, Kush accepted $58m in bribes for trump to push for Aramco IPO in Wall Street, Israeli military jets in SA to support MBS incase the old guard puts up a fight, etc etc.

This US involvement with SA internal politics could easily blow up and the world end up with an even more radical SA regime or war with Iran.
I doubt Israel would want to involve itself in this mess, dude...
 

Tedminator

Former Staff
Jun 2010
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I doubt Israel would want to involve itself in this mess, dude...
Doubtful, yeah. But you know how conspiracy theorists are in the “west”.. Magnify that by 100 in the Middle East. Google “Israeli jets in Saudi” and you’ll see.
 
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The Man

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HayJenn

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Jul 2014
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What the Heck Just Happened in Saudi Arabia?

Even by the torrid pace of change Saudis have become used to under Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman, developments over the past two days have been as frenetic as they are momentous. The removal of Prince Miteb bin Abdullah as commander of the Saudi Arabian National Guard and one of the few remaining autonomous sources of authority in the kingdom, was followed swiftly by the detention of at least 11 members of the ruling family and dozens of others, including government ministers and ex-ministers and key figures in the business community. The detentions, framed as part of a sweeping crackdown on corruption following a royal decree that mandated a Supreme Committee headed by Mohammed bin Salman to address the issue, represent the latest in a series of bold moves by a youthful crown prince who has centralized authority to a degree unprecedented in recent Saudi history, but risk weakening the checks and balances that for decades have characterized royal family rule in the kingdom.

The roll-call of the detained reads like a who’s who of the Saudi policymaking community. It includes two sons of the late King Abdullah (Prince Miteb and Prince Turki); Prince Alwaleed bin Talal, the billionaire investor in Twitter, Apple, Citigroup, Twenty-First Century Fox, and dozens of other global brands; Saleh Kamel, another billionaire who headed one of the largest business conglomerates in the Middle East; Adel Fakieh, who as minister of economy and planning was intimately involved in the preparatory work for Saudi Arabia’s sweepingly ambitious Vision 2030 economic transformation plan; Ibrahim al-Assaf, who served 20 years as the kingdom’s minister of finance until 2016; Amr al-Dabbagh, who as governor of the Saudi Arabian General Investment Authority between 2004 and 2012 led drives to increase foreign investment into the country; Khalid al-Tuwayjri, the enormously influential ‘gatekeeper’ to King Abdullah’s Royal Court; Waleed al-Ibrahim, head of the MBC media empire and a brother-in-law of the late King Fahd; and Bakr bin Laden, chairman of the Saudi BinLadin Group and older half-brother of the slain Al Qaeda leader, Osama bin Laden.

It’s a typically bold move for a crown prince who has made such sweeping strokes the hallmark of his swift rise. And yet, the concentration of such authority in one individual may unravel the careful mixture of consensus and balancing among competing interests within both the royal family and Saudi society at large. Since the creation of the modern Kingdom of Saudi Arabia in 1932 and especially after the rise of Crown Prince (later King) Faisal in the 1960s, the royal family has sought a pragmatic and gradualist approach to social and political change. This helped to cushion the impact of economic modernization and guide the kingdom through periods of great internal strain, such as the 1979 takeover of the Grand Mosque and the post-2003 terrorist campaign by Al Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula. They also represented a pragmatic acknowledgment of the multiple centers of gravity within the royal family, which acted as a check on the unconstrained exercise of power by any one individual.

https://www.politico.com/magazine/story/2017/11/06/saudi-arabia-mohammed-bin-salman-215792

This has the potential to destabilize the region. Already reports that bin Salman wants escalate the war in Yemen. And is moving dangerously close to outright military confrontation with Iran.

The last thing the US needs is to be dragged into a another war in the Middle East.
 
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Feb 2007
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It appears power has been consolidated under the pretext of modernization and ability to make a decision without the massive and slow moving consensus of the House of Saud.

Good or bad?

Well, our president certainly praised this most undemocratic of moves, as it settled a personal beef he had with one of the many princes.

https://www.cbsnews.com/news/trump-prince-alwaleed-long-feud/


The kingdom certainly appears to be trying to modernize in the face of the finite energy of oil and changing views on the more conservative local cult sects, but I am not sure that consolidation of power is a good thing. That is how dictators are born.
 
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HayJenn

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Jul 2014
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The Trump administration has tied the United States to the impetuous young crown prince of Saudi Arabia and seems to be quite oblivious to the dangers. But they are growing every day. Saudi Arabia's King Salman and his favorite son, Crown Prince Muhammad bin Salman, have broken with the traditional patterns of consensual politics in the royal family, and the results are likely to be a much less stable kingdom with increasingly impulsive and erratic policies.A purge is now under way that includes imprisonment of top princes (albeit in a former luxury hotel), the confiscation of assets, and at least two mysterious deaths.

Earlier, the king sacked two sitting crown princes, Muqrin bin Abdelaziz and Muhammad bin Nayef, a very close ally of the United States in the fight against terrorism, to advance his young son's prospects. These are unprecedented moves in Saudi history. And this weekend he sacked the commander of the Saudi Arabian National Guard (SANG), Prince Mutaib bin Abdullah. The SANG is a 100,000 man praetorian guard that protects the royal family from coups and revolution. Mutaib was the favorite son of the late King Abdullah. His ouster alienates a powerful wing of the family and a large tribal alliance.

Since his trip to Riyadh last May, President Trump has wholeheartedly backed the king and his son. Over the concerns of the State Department and the US military, the White House has endorsed the Saudi-led effort to blockade Qatar. The blockade has been a failure so far and has probably destroyed the Gulf Cooperation Council, the regional alliance which the U.S. has backed since Ronald Reagan. The administration has trumpeted its policy as securing tens of billions of dollars in arms sales. In fact very few have gone beyond the discussion phase. They are more statements of interest than contracts. It's mostly fake news.

Since the early 1960s, Saudi Arabia has been one of the most stable and predictable players in the Middle East. Aside from some terrorist threats, usually quickly eradicated by Muhammad bin Nayef, it has been a safe place to travel and invest. That all appears to be in doubt. Splintering the royal family is a dangerous approach. Arresting and perhaps even killing political opponents is not likely to encourage investors. Fanning sectarian violence is bound to fuel turbulence. A dangerous region is getting more volatile.

https://www.thedailybeast.com/trumps-bet-on-the-saudis-looks-increasingly-dangerous-and-the-110-billion-dollar-payoff-looks-unlikely?source=twitter&via=mobile

And why in the world is Jared conducting secret meetings with the Saudi's?
 
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Feb 2007
11,339
9,627
In my mind
The Trump administration has tied the United States to the impetuous young crown prince of Saudi Arabia and seems to be quite oblivious to the dangers. But they are growing every day. Saudi Arabia's King Salman and his favorite son, Crown Prince Muhammad bin Salman, have broken with the traditional patterns of consensual politics in the royal family, and the results are likely to be a much less stable kingdom with increasingly impulsive and erratic policies.A purge is now under way that includes imprisonment of top princes (albeit in a former luxury hotel), the confiscation of assets, and at least two mysterious deaths.

Earlier, the king sacked two sitting crown princes, Muqrin bin Abdelaziz and Muhammad bin Nayef, a very close ally of the United States in the fight against terrorism, to advance his young son's prospects. These are unprecedented moves in Saudi history. And this weekend he sacked the commander of the Saudi Arabian National Guard (SANG), Prince Mutaib bin Abdullah. The SANG is a 100,000 man praetorian guard that protects the royal family from coups and revolution. Mutaib was the favorite son of the late King Abdullah. His ouster alienates a powerful wing of the family and a large tribal alliance.

Since his trip to Riyadh last May, President Trump has wholeheartedly backed the king and his son. Over the concerns of the State Department and the US military, the White House has endorsed the Saudi-led effort to blockade Qatar. The blockade has been a failure so far and has probably destroyed the Gulf Cooperation Council, the regional alliance which the U.S. has backed since Ronald Reagan. The administration has trumpeted its policy as securing tens of billions of dollars in arms sales. In fact very few have gone beyond the discussion phase. They are more statements of interest than contracts. It's mostly fake news.

Since the early 1960s, Saudi Arabia has been one of the most stable and predictable players in the Middle East. Aside from some terrorist threats, usually quickly eradicated by Muhammad bin Nayef, it has been a safe place to travel and invest. That all appears to be in doubt. Splintering the royal family is a dangerous approach. Arresting and perhaps even killing political opponents is not likely to encourage investors. Fanning sectarian violence is bound to fuel turbulence. A dangerous region is getting more volatile.

https://www.thedailybeast.com/trumps-bet-on-the-saudis-looks-increasingly-dangerous-and-the-110-billion-dollar-payoff-looks-unlikely?source=twitter&via=mobile

And why in the world is Jared conducting secret meetings with the Saudi's?

Trump seems to have a serious man crush on aspiring dictators and accomplished tyrants.
 
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RNG

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Jan 2015
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Twit:

Donald J. Trump‏Verified account @realDonaldTrump 20h20 hours ago

I have great confidence in King Salman and the Crown Prince of Saudi Arabia, they know exactly what they are doing....
Twit continued:

Donald J. Trump‏Verified account @realDonaldTrump 20h20 hours ago

Replying to @realDonaldTrump
....Some of those they are harshly treating have been “milking” their country for years!
So see, it's all HUUUUGLY, biggly the best.

Other than most see it as a power grab, akin to what President Xi just did in China.

45 is just jealous and wishes he could do the same.
 
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