Scientists Say Gene-Edited Babies Claim Is 'Wake-Up Call' For World

ARMCX1

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#1
Reports of the gene editing of human embryos carried through to birth have raised concerns about the ethics and safety of such procedures.The US National Academy of Medicine, National Academy of Sciences and the Chinese Academy of Sciences have recommended a halt to such experiments until a global protocol is agreed for approval and supervision of modifying human embryos. Other research institutes prefer a complete moratorium on gene editing and the production of edited human babies under the principle that science must be subordinate to the societies it's funded and springs from.

The problems stem from the use of a technique called CRISPR to edit genes in living organisms. A large number of reports about inadvertent alterations in the genome have persisted for 2-3 years; and to be blunt, the use of CRISPR in our lab has given rise to unanticipated difficulties and results - consistent with other reports. Some of the results appear to be related to differences in the frequency of homologous recombination - a necessary requirement for gene editing by CRISPR. In order to insure no accidental genomic changes happened, the entire edited genome would have to be sequenced (not that big of a deal anymore).

Until these issues are resolved and corrected, my feeling is that there should be no more edited babies in the pipeline.

Scientists Say Gene-Edited Babies Claim Is 'Wake-Up Call' For World
Three of the most influential scientific organizations in the world are calling for an urgent international effort to prevent scientists from creating any more gene-edited babies without proper approval and supervision.

Global standards are needed quickly to ensure gene-editing of human embryos moves ahead safely and ethically, according to the presidents of the U.S. National Academy of Medicine, U.S. National Academy of Sciences and the Chinese Academy of Sciences.

"To maintain the public's trust that someday genome editing will be able to treat or prevent disease, the research community needs to take steps now to demonstrate that this new tool can be applied with competence, integrity, and benevolence," the three presidents — Marcia McNutt, Victor Dzau, and Chunli Bai — wrote in an unusual editorial published Thursday in the journal Science.

The editorial is headlined: "Wake-up call from Hong Kong." It was prompted by the Chinese scientist who stunned the world by claiming that he had created twin girls from embryos whose DNA he had edited in his lab.
Scientists Say Gene-Edited Babies Claim Is 'Wake-Up Call' For World
 
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ARMCX1

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#3
Lots of people want "designer babies".

We will see more, not less of them...
That's likely true but probably not for awhile, at least if it were to be done in the US. They'll have to figure out why so many CRISPR experiments go awry. It seems that a few cells of the embryos were taken to do single cell genomic sequencing which they say showed no unintended rearrangements. These guys need to give the detailed specifics of what they did and what the results were.

The purpose of the gene editing was was to take embryos from fathers who have HIV and mothers who don't and edit a gene called CCR5 and turn it into an allele (variants of a gene) that blocks the entry of HIV. Of the 2 edited embryos, one had both copies of CCR5 changed and the other only had one copy edited and the other not. Both copies edited can't be infected by HIV and one copy edited can. 50% success.
 
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That's likely true but probably not for awhile, at least if it were to be done in the US. They'll have to figure out why so many CRISPR experiments go awry. It seems that a few cells of the embryos were taken to do single cell genomic sequencing which they say showed no unintended rearrangements. These guys need to give the detailed specifics of what they did and what the results were.

The purpose of the gene editing was was to take embryos from fathers who have HIV and mothers who don't and edit a gene called CCR5 and turn it into an allele (variants of a gene) that blocks the entry of HIV. Of the 2 edited embryos, one had both copies of CCR5 changed and the other only had one copy edited and the other not. Both copies edited can't be infected by HIV and one copy edited can. 50% success.
I don't know.

I agree that we can pretty much control it in the US, but worldwide is another matter.

Think N Korea would have any ethical qualms about raising a bunch of big, strong warrior types?

As good as it is to prevent HIV/AIDS, there will be plenty who want to do other things, not such good things, with this technology.

As always...
 
Likes: ARMCX1
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#5
The technology is somewhere around 20-30 years old.

You could be working with a "CRISPR baby" and would never know it.

If they can edit out things like cancer, blindness, etc, and it doesn't lead to something messed up 5-10 generations down the line... I'd be all for it.

If they start making random chimeras; that is just bad.

Also, probably good to be cautious about returning extinct species back.
 
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The technology is somewhere around 20-30 years old.

You could be working with a "CRISPR baby" and would never know it.

If they can edit out things like cancer, blindness, etc, and it doesn't lead to something messed up 5-10 generations down the line... I'd be all for it.

If they start making random chimeras; that is just bad.

Also, probably good to be cautious about returning extinct species back.
Jurassic Park, anyone?
 

ARMCX1

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#8
Will gene therapy cure those with an alternative life style to straight people?
That's an excellent question. In my opinion no because the genetic effect likely happens during embryonic development. One things for sure, genetic studies of homosexuality are not a hot subject matter for funding.
 
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That's an excellent question. In my opinion no because the genetic effect likely happens during embryonic development. One things for sure, genetic studies of homosexuality are not a hot subject matter for funding.
You would think it might evoke more conversation. I'd read somewhere, can't recall, the early stages of DNA development of humans would require removing the fetus with the next evolutionary step being able to "repair" DNA in situ. After the genetic and other diseases would presumably be cured, designer babies and the resultant super humans would be next, if they can control their enthusiasm to jump some steps. Now being a subject of debate by think tanks and probably the Pentagon, of a superhuman race, between China and the US/europe/Russia and probably places like North Korea. Haven't been talking much about making people dumber for the more menial tasks but it's probably part of the logic mindset too.
 
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ARMCX1

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#10
Just to clarify, I doubt any sort of gene therapy to "correct" would work in an adult. It might be feasible in embryos if the genetics were understood. There'd be the issue of penetrance - how often a version of a gene expresses itself physically (phenotype) so it wouldn't be possible to say whether this embryo would produce a gay or straight individual. Lots of stumbling blocks to getting regulatory approval.
 

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