Sherrod Brown Ad

Jul 2014
37,462
9,849
midwest
No thanks, I know google has many stories I do not agree with, but your statng it in your post tells me a great deal. I think it is pathetic you use it.
Yeah, I didn't think you'd want to hear the truth about Algore.

But, if you ever changedyour mind and DO want to hear the truth about Algore the "Crazed Sex Poodle", I'm pretty sure it will be on the internet that Agore invented, for a long, long time...
 
Jul 2014
37,462
9,849
midwest
I have seen Joe Biden. He is a loving, friendly man, unlike the trash in the WhiteHouse.
I agree that he's a decent guy and fairly likeable.

He's definitely a groper, though.

Just can't control his hands around women and young girls.

Kinda creepy, dontcha think?

Plus he says the stupidest things at the worst possible times.

Like when he told the guy in the wheelchair to "stand up".

Or when he said : "Three letter word: J-O-B-S!"

But, yeah, he seems to be a nice guy...
 
Jan 2016
54,844
51,399
Colorado
That is factually incorrect.

Even if it WAS correct, and it's not, as Hillary once said..."what difference, at this point does it make?"

Except to give the whiney whiners another thing to whine about?

They just loves to whine about things that are completely meaningless...
No, it is NOT 'factually incorrect'. Apparently, you are simply unaware that a complete recount of ALL the Florida ballots would have given the Florida vote to Al Gore, and hence would have made him the rightful President of the United States. As is so often the case, your ignorance is showing.
 
Jan 2016
54,844
51,399
Colorado
Yeah, I didn't think you'd want to hear the truth about Algore.

But, if you ever changedyour mind and DO want to hear the truth about Algore the "Crazed Sex Poodle", I'm pretty sure it will be on the internet that Agore invented, for a long, long time...
Ah. And there's the other big lie about Al Gore, the false story that he claimed to have invented the Internet. The guys who actually DID invent the Internet actually give him a great deal of credit, you know. Actually, you probably DON'T know, as you seem to make a specialty of that.....
 
Jul 2014
37,462
9,849
midwest
No, it is NOT 'factually incorrect'. Apparently, you are simply unaware that a complete recount of ALL the Florida ballots would have given the Florida vote to Al Gore, and hence would have made him the rightful President of the United States. As is so often the case, your ignorance is showing.
You STILL trying to rewrite history?

Gore just like Hillary, is a loser.

They both lost their respective elections.

Time to get over it...
 
Jul 2014
37,462
9,849
midwest
Ah. And there's the other big lie about Al Gore, the false story that he claimed to have invented the Internet. The guys who actually DID invent the Internet actually give him a great deal of credit, you know. Actually, you probably DON'T know, as you seem to make a specialty of that.....
Yeah, I know, but it's fun to poke a little fun at ole Al "Crazed Sex Poodle" Gore.

And THAT accusation IS true.

Even if some members don't want to hear it...
 
Jan 2016
54,844
51,399
Colorado
You STILL trying to rewrite history?

Gore just like Hillary, is a loser.

They both lost their respective elections.

Time to get over it...
Just on the OFF chance that you would actually WANT to educate and inform yourself:

The National Opinion Research Center at the University of Chicago, sponsored by a consortium of major United States news organizations, conducted the Florida Ballot Project, a comprehensive review of 175,010 ballots that were collected from the entire state, not just the disputed counties that were recounted.[64] These ballots contained undervotes (votes with no choice made for president) and overvotes (votes made with more than one choice marked). The organization analyzed 61,190 undervotes and 113,820 overvotes. Of those overvotes, 68,476 chose Gore and a minor candidate; 23,591 chose Bush and a minor candidate.[32] Because there was no clear indication of what the voters intended, those numbers were not included in the consortium's final tabulations.[31]

The project's goal was to determine the reliability and accuracy of the systems used in the voting process, including how different systems correlated with voter mistakes. The total number of undervotes and overvotes in Florida amounted to 3% of all votes cast in the state. The review's findings were reported in the media during the week after November 12, 2001, by the organizations that funded the recount: Associated Press, CNN, The Wall Street Journal, The New York Times, The Washington Post, The St. Petersburg Times, The Palm Beach Post and Tribune Publishing, which included the Los Angeles Times, South Florida Sun-Sentinel, Orlando Sentinel and Chicago Tribune.[65][66]

Based on the NORC review, the media group concluded that if the disputes over the validity of all the ballots in question had been consistently resolved and any uniform standard applied, the electoral result would have been reversed and Gore would have won by 60 to 171 votes (with, for each punch ballot, at least two of the three ballot reviewers' codes being in agreement). The standards that were chosen for the NORC study ranged from a "most restrictive" standard (accepts only so-called perfect ballots that machines somehow missed and did not count, or ballots with unambiguous expressions of voter intent) to a "most inclusive" standard (applies a uniform standard of "dimple or better" on punch marks and "all affirmative marks" on optical scan ballots).[4]

An analysis of the NORC data by University of Pennsylvania researcher Steven F. Freeman and journalist Joel Bleifuss concluded that, no matter what standard is used, after a recount of all uncounted votes, Gore would have been the victor.[32] Such a statewide review including all uncounted votes was a tangible possibility, as Leon County Circuit Court Judge Terry Lewis, whom the Florida Supreme Court had assigned to oversee the statewide recount, had scheduled a hearing for December 13 (mooted by the U.S. Supreme Court's final ruling on the 12th) to consider the question of including overvotes. Subsequent statements by Lewis and internal court documents support the likelihood that overvotes would have been included in the recount.[67] Florida State University professor of public policy Lance deHaven-Smith observed that, even considering only undervotes, "under any of the five most reasonable interpretations of the Florida Supreme Court ruling, Gore does, in fact, more than make up the deficit".[4] Fairness and Accuracy in Reporting's analysis of the NORC study and media coverage of it supported these interpretations and criticized the coverage of the study by media outlets such as The New York Times and the other media consortium members for focusing on how events might have played out rather than on the statewide vote count.[66]
 
Likes: MaryAnne
Jul 2014
37,462
9,849
midwest
Just on the OFF chance that you would actually WANT to educate and inform yourself:

The National Opinion Research Center at the University of Chicago, sponsored by a consortium of major United States news organizations, conducted the Florida Ballot Project, a comprehensive review of 175,010 ballots that were collected from the entire state, not just the disputed counties that were recounted.[64] These ballots contained undervotes (votes with no choice made for president) and overvotes (votes made with more than one choice marked). The organization analyzed 61,190 undervotes and 113,820 overvotes. Of those overvotes, 68,476 chose Gore and a minor candidate; 23,591 chose Bush and a minor candidate.[32] Because there was no clear indication of what the voters intended, those numbers were not included in the consortium's final tabulations.[31]

The project's goal was to determine the reliability and accuracy of the systems used in the voting process, including how different systems correlated with voter mistakes. The total number of undervotes and overvotes in Florida amounted to 3% of all votes cast in the state. The review's findings were reported in the media during the week after November 12, 2001, by the organizations that funded the recount: Associated Press, CNN, The Wall Street Journal, The New York Times, The Washington Post, The St. Petersburg Times, The Palm Beach Post and Tribune Publishing, which included the Los Angeles Times, South Florida Sun-Sentinel, Orlando Sentinel and Chicago Tribune.[65][66]

Based on the NORC review, the media group concluded that if the disputes over the validity of all the ballots in question had been consistently resolved and any uniform standard applied, the electoral result would have been reversed and Gore would have won by 60 to 171 votes (with, for each punch ballot, at least two of the three ballot reviewers' codes being in agreement). The standards that were chosen for the NORC study ranged from a "most restrictive" standard (accepts only so-called perfect ballots that machines somehow missed and did not count, or ballots with unambiguous expressions of voter intent) to a "most inclusive" standard (applies a uniform standard of "dimple or better" on punch marks and "all affirmative marks" on optical scan ballots).[4]

An analysis of the NORC data by University of Pennsylvania researcher Steven F. Freeman and journalist Joel Bleifuss concluded that, no matter what standard is used, after a recount of all uncounted votes, Gore would have been the victor.[32] Such a statewide review including all uncounted votes was a tangible possibility, as Leon County Circuit Court Judge Terry Lewis, whom the Florida Supreme Court had assigned to oversee the statewide recount, had scheduled a hearing for December 13 (mooted by the U.S. Supreme Court's final ruling on the 12th) to consider the question of including overvotes. Subsequent statements by Lewis and internal court documents support the likelihood that overvotes would have been included in the recount.[67] Florida State University professor of public policy Lance deHaven-Smith observed that, even considering only undervotes, "under any of the five most reasonable interpretations of the Florida Supreme Court ruling, Gore does, in fact, more than make up the deficit".[4] Fairness and Accuracy in Reporting's analysis of the NORC study and media coverage of it supported these interpretations and criticized the coverage of the study by media outlets such as The New York Times and the other media consortium members for focusing on how events might have played out rather than on the statewide vote count.[66]
Heard it all before.

Here's the point:

IT DOES NOT MATTER