Should morbid obesity be a qualifier for Disability?

Nov 2006
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Interesting topic. As someone who's struggling with my weight at present (though not morbid obesity), I've been taking more note lately of obesity's prevalence. There's no question it carries with it a whole host of related health issues. Should it, in and of itself, qualify one for disability? I'm not sure -- will have to think about it. In theory, it's something that can be "fixed" or, at least, improved (unlike, say, an amputated limb, or a disease like MS or ALS.) Hmm. Pondering.
You really want to take note of it spend a little time in Europe (probably just about any other country) and then come back here. Not that everyone there is fit and trim but you can easily tell when you are home just by looking at the preponderance of fatties. We should evaluate the nutrition/calorie ratios of foods and tax the shit out of the worst offenders. "One big mac, that will be $24.95".

The ex wife told me something recently that I found very true. If the food you are buying has no label telling you it's calories or nutrition information those are the ones you should be eating. She was right, I picked up a head of broccoli the other day and it had no such label. The apples in the bin? No such label. Grabbed a few avocados, no such label. The TV dinner I picked up had a friggin novel on the back telling me what was in it. Those are the ones you should be putting back.
 
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Blueneck

Former Staff
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My hospital performs a lot of weight loss surgery...it is the majority of patients who make up our census. It depends on what is going on with the patient as far as determining surgery. If a patient is not ambulatory or has conditions that cause them to be sedentary, we will do the surgery without asking them to diet and lose weight first. Some people will gain the weight back and some will keep the weight off. Stress eating is something that should be identified and addressed by the patient during the process. It is not the fault of the surgery...it is the patient.
Several years ago I was eating while pissed about something else and my stomach started hurting and realized I was eating really fast. It was one of those things that once I became aware that I was doing it, it wasn't hard to stop.
 

Blueneck

Former Staff
Jun 2007
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Caregivers are often sucked into a vortex when it comes to family and a lot of times, friends. It is because you are professionals and know how to care for a person correctly. For example, how to lift or move a patient without injury. I do get your point tho...it is hard to maintain empathy when a person does nothing to help themselves. I think you need to be paid for this extra service, it is only fair. I would have a chat with the son about compensation for his mother if you want to care for her...it is a hard job and you are trustworthy. It is worth it.
The son isn't able to communicate at all. Born with hydrocephalus. Lots of major physical and developmental disabilities, grand mal seizures, blind, you name it. But he's an extraordinarily sweet kid in his own way though, you just have to get used to him. They do have aids 12 hours a day so it's not as if the care falls entirely on them.
 

Blueneck

Former Staff
Jun 2007
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Ohio
Jesus, Blue, that sounds like a terrible situation all around. Big, big respect for dealing with irrational people, which must be a hundred times more difficult when you're emotionally involved, and how could you not be when it's your family. And I would say working for relatives must bring some issues even if they are perfectly reasonable, which is clearly not the case here. You're a hero for even trying to improve the situation and they should be very grateful to you (on edit: in addition to paying you for your work, of course). *hug*
Then I get to come home and listen to my conspiracy obsessed sister with her illuminati crap and "the Jews are communicating in code and staging false flags everywhere and they're bent on world domination from the beginning of time and yeah, it took two thousand years to get one country, but eventually they'll turn us all into slaves!!" alerts. :DDsmilie_panic:

She's also a rabid Trump supporter who bought a MAGA hat just to piss me off. PH is where I come for civil conversation. :zany:
 
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Helena

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Maybe my user title will provide a clue.
PH is where I come for civil conversation. :zany:
That might be the single most tragic sentence I have ever read. :D

Seriously though, I remember you posted some time ago about your sister and how she wants to see New York nuked because that's where Jews did 9/11 or some other plank-across-the-face amazing, Borat-level insanity, and I took that all into context. Honest to God, I'm in awe of your strength and resilience that even allows you to keep your sense of humor.
 
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Nov 2006
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Several years ago I was eating while pissed about something else and my stomach started hurting and realized I was eating really fast. It was one of those things that once I became aware that I was doing it, it wasn't hard to stop.
Yeah but someone might sneak up and steal it from you if you don't eat it fast. That's what Beezer tells me when I tell him to "slow down, you don't have to wolf it down so fast".
 
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Jun 2011
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God Bless Texas
In the case of the OP...there are other conditions that will prevent successful weight loss...such as her arthritis. IMO, her age is working against her and she needs to get the weight off her body and joints so she can exercise. Otherwise, she will end up in a wheelchair completely. Over 60, you can tank fast. The counseling prior, during and after the surgery includes a exercise program because you cannot successfully lose weight or maintain weight without it. If you have arthritis or joint pain from excess weight, you can't exercise. If a patient is 30, without mobility issues, it is a different approach. Older people are stubborn and coaching for wellness is often a challenge. Nothing is guaranteed but perhaps a chance to change their attitude.
As you stipulated, surgery alone does no good. It is entirely reliant on patient compliance. There is no reason to believe this woman would be complaint.
 

Blueneck

Former Staff
Jun 2007
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Ohio
As you stipulated, surgery alone does no good. It is entirely reliant on patient compliance. There is no reason to believe this woman would be complaint.
I would think getting the surgery would imply one intends to make an honest effort to lose weight. And I don't think it's all that easy not to comply with a smaller stomach, is it?
 
Jun 2011
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God Bless Texas
Blue, you have my sympathy. I have an Aunt that prattles on about everyone's sins while she eats herself to death. Surgery would not help her. She'd eat her way right back to where she is now like my sister did, and it's worse when someone does that post surgery than before.

They have to REALLY REALLY REALLY want to lose weight to go along with tablespoons of food for 'meals'. I have two friends who are doing it because they are totally committed, your relative does not fall into this category and surgery would end her life rather than save it. My sister is dead from her feeling that it was a magic solution.