Should morbid obesity be a qualifier for Disability?

Jun 2011
49,152
20,599
God Bless Texas
#51
I would think getting the surgery would imply one intends to make an honest effort to lose weight. And I don't think it's all that easy not to comply with a smaller stomach, is it?
Slowly, it is. It stretches. Look up how many people go right back to where they were. And, your relative isn't interested in an honest effort, you said that. Your post indicates you misunderstand the procedure entirely to think it forces the weight loss, which it does not.

My sister started off with the tablespoon portions, and then over a period of just a few years ate more and more until she ate exactly what she had before, and it killed her because of the surgery. Her non-altered stomach could have continued to handle it.

People who do it right are in a life long struggle to not be malnourished, is why I caution anyone I know against it. My friend listened to me and opted for the balloon instead, and she is doing great post-balloon because she has the willpower.

HC claims medical expertise on all things medical w/o basis. If I believed her posts, she'd have 47 different jobs at the same time. No matter the topic, she claims that is what she personally deals with everyday. And she has posted 'fact' after fact that is patently untrue and easily disproven.
 

StanStill

Former Staff
Dec 2013
12,666
14,116
Work
#52
Either that or it's a more convenient excuse than digging into the problem. If she says she loves food too much it saves face because she doesn't have to admit she wants to change but it's a struggle that she's losing. A lot of people will make up a lie to cover for what they see as a failure.


True enough... Lots of people decide they just don't want something they repeatedly tried and failed to get.
 
Jun 2011
49,152
20,599
God Bless Texas
#53
LAST UPDATED: 02/14/2018
Weight gain after gastric sleeve surgery:

Happens for as many as 30% of patients
Starts anywhere from 18 months to 6 years after surgery
Ranges from a regaining a small amount of weight to all of the excess weight lost
Is usually caused by the stomach stretching back out as the result of poor diet choices

https://www.bariatric-surgery-source.com/weight-gain-after-gastric-sleeve.html

There is no permanent forced small stomach, unable to accept excess food.
 
Jun 2011
49,152
20,599
God Bless Texas
#54


True enough... Lots of people decide they just don't want something they repeatedly tried and failed to get.
That is what my Aunt says. She says everytime she loses weight she gains even more back, so she gives up on that. It's applicable to other things as well, as your post seems to indicate. She will not say the words 'I cannot control how much I eat', but it's implied in what she did say. IMO, this is different than people with actual metabolism issues that would require starvation to resolve. That totally blows.
 

Blueneck

Former Staff
Jun 2007
53,864
40,380
Ohio
#55
LAST UPDATED: 02/14/2018
Weight gain after gastric sleeve surgery:

Happens for as many as 30% of patients
Starts anywhere from 18 months to 6 years after surgery
Ranges from a regaining a small amount of weight to all of the excess weight lost
Is usually caused by the stomach stretching back out as the result of poor diet choices

https://www.bariatric-surgery-source.com/weight-gain-after-gastric-sleeve.html

There is no permanent forced small stomach, unable to accept excess food.
18 months to 6 years after surgery is a long time for someone who is morbidly obese and middle aged. The risk of gaining it back later is certainly worth doing it to lose over a hundred pounds in a year. Trying traditional weight loss methods it would likely take 18 months to lose half that. And for someone who can't exercise it would be even longer. People who become that overweight generally don't have a lot of food discipline to begin with.
 
Nov 2006
54,269
20,211
#56
18 months to 6 years after surgery is a long time for someone who is morbidly obese and middle aged. The risk of gaining it back later is certainly worth doing it to lose over a hundred pounds in a year. Trying traditional weight loss methods it would likely take 18 months to lose half that. And for someone who can't exercise it would be even longer. People who become that overweight generally don't have a lot of food discipline to begin with.
I would say go for the surgery if you can convince her. Even if she may gain it back it will take quite awhile and dropping 100 lbs could be the incentive to keep it off. Diets that take a month to lose 5 lbs don't provide that incentive, you cheat and put 3lbs back on and it seems hopeless. Drop 100 and she may say wow, I like this, i'm not going back to the way I was.
 
Likes: 1 person

Macduff

Moderator
Apr 2010
94,072
31,810
Pittsburgh, PA
#57
Interesting topic. As someone who's struggling with my weight at present (though not morbid obesity), I've been taking more note lately of obesity's prevalence. There's no question it carries with it a whole host of related health issues. Should it, in and of itself, qualify one for disability? I'm not sure -- will have to think about it. In theory, it's something that can be "fixed" or, at least, improved (unlike, say, an amputated limb, or a disease like MS or ALS.) Hmm. Pondering.
And offering disability would be a perverse disincentive not to "fix" the problem.
 
Jun 2011
49,152
20,599
God Bless Texas
#58
18 months to 6 years after surgery is a long time for someone who is morbidly obese and middle aged. The risk of gaining it back later is certainly worth doing it to lose over a hundred pounds in a year. Trying traditional weight loss methods it would likely take 18 months to lose half that. And for someone who can't exercise it would be even longer. People who become that overweight generally don't have a lot of food discipline to begin with.
The surgery requires discipline.
 

boontito

Future Staff
Jan 2008
105,330
94,764
Most Insidious
#59
LAST UPDATED: 02/14/2018
Weight gain after gastric sleeve surgery:

Happens for as many as 30% of patients
Starts anywhere from 18 months to 6 years after surgery
Ranges from a regaining a small amount of weight to all of the excess weight lost
Is usually caused by the stomach stretching back out as the result of poor diet choices

https://www.bariatric-surgery-source.com/weight-gain-after-gastric-sleeve.html

There is no permanent forced small stomach, unable to accept excess food.
Only 30%? That's better than I thought it'd be after reading your prior stories.