Social Media Outrage Marketing

Macduff

Moderator
Apr 2010
96,817
33,729
Pittsburgh, PA
#1
To all Little Mermaid fans who were disheartened to learn that Disney casting a black woman in the role of Ariel had prompted a racist backlash, worry not: The #NotMyAriel controversy is mostly fake news.

Last week, Disney announced that Halle Bailey, a black actress, would portray the fictional mermaid princess in a live-action remake. Allegedly, this infuriated some racists because Ariel is red-haired and white-skinned in the cartoon version. "Us white girls, who grew up with The Little Mermaid, deserved a true-to-color Ariel," wrote one critic, Rebeccs, in a tweet that went viral. "Disney, you made a huge mistake by hiring Halle Bailey."

Horrified? Don't be. A troll account was responsible for the tweet, as Buzzfeed's Brandon Wall helpfully explained:

Moreover, there were a lot more people responding to the tweet and disagreeing with it than liking it.
------

#NotMyAriel was trending because a lot of people were tweeting that it's stupid to be offended by a black Ariel. This is not evidence of a widespread backlash, but evidence against it. Mistakes like these are the result of taking social media too seriously and too literally.
The Backlash Over The Little Mermaid Casting a Black Ariel Is Fake News

So the whole thing was artificially generated. There could be any number of suspects. It could have been a 4chan prank. It could have been the Russians stirring things up. But one theory is Disney created the account and started the controversy. Look at all the free publicity they got out of it. And they get to look like social justice heroes.
Nike got a lot of mileage out of their phony social justice controversy. The director of the new Terminator movie is desperately trying to create a backlash. 'Terminator: Dark Fate' will 'scare the f**k' out of sexist trolls, says director As if fans of the Terminator movies are adverse to strong female characters.
So how about it? Are phony social media outrages the new marketing strategy?
 
Jun 2014
61,627
35,976
Cleveland, Ohio
#2
To all Little Mermaid fans who were disheartened to learn that Disney casting a black woman in the role of Ariel had prompted a racist backlash, worry not: The #NotMyAriel controversy is mostly fake news.

Last week, Disney announced that Halle Bailey, a black actress, would portray the fictional mermaid princess in a live-action remake. Allegedly, this infuriated some racists because Ariel is red-haired and white-skinned in the cartoon version. "Us white girls, who grew up with The Little Mermaid, deserved a true-to-color Ariel," wrote one critic, Rebeccs, in a tweet that went viral. "Disney, you made a huge mistake by hiring Halle Bailey."

Horrified? Don't be. A troll account was responsible for the tweet, as Buzzfeed's Brandon Wall helpfully explained:

Moreover, there were a lot more people responding to the tweet and disagreeing with it than liking it.
------

#NotMyAriel was trending because a lot of people were tweeting that it's stupid to be offended by a black Ariel. This is not evidence of a widespread backlash, but evidence against it. Mistakes like these are the result of taking social media too seriously and too literally.
The Backlash Over The Little Mermaid Casting a Black Ariel Is Fake News

So the whole thing was artificially generated. There could be any number of suspect. It could have been a 4chan prank. It could have been the Russians stirring things up. But one theory is Disney, created the account and started the controversy. Look at all the free publicity they got out of it. And they get to look like social justice heroes.
Nike got a lot of mileage out of their phony social justice controversy. The director of the new Terminator movie is desperately trying to create a backlash. 'Terminator: Dark Fate' will 'scare the f**k' out of sexist trolls, says director As if fans of the Terminator movies are adverse to strong female characters.
So how about it? Are phony social media outrages the new marketing strategy?
Probably. This isn't the first Disney live-action movie controversy in this year, and their streaming channel is about to go live.

Seems like a high-risk tactic, because it can so easily slip the leash, but it sure must be cheap.

Virtually every consumer product manufacturer is on Twitter, and MANY of them have semi-famous troll battles.
 
Oct 2014
33,166
6,066
C-A-N-A-D-A-Eh
#5
And in other news, a movie about Malcolm X is in production where they are casting Bruce Willis as the starring role.

It is strange the trend of Disney to cast out the gingers from their films...

Really though, the original little mermaid had green skin, gave up her ability to speak so she could walk on ground, with feet that bleed with every step. I'm pretty sure race isn't a factor in the original story.
 
Mar 2019
3,285
1,687
"US" of A
#8
To all Little Mermaid fans who were disheartened to learn that Disney casting a black woman in the role of Ariel had prompted a racist backlash, worry not: The #NotMyAriel controversy is mostly fake news.

Last week, Disney announced that Halle Bailey, a black actress, would portray the fictional mermaid princess in a live-action remake. Allegedly, this infuriated some racists because Ariel is red-haired and white-skinned in the cartoon version. "Us white girls, who grew up with The Little Mermaid, deserved a true-to-color Ariel," wrote one critic, Rebeccs, in a tweet that went viral. "Disney, you made a huge mistake by hiring Halle Bailey."

Horrified? Don't be. A troll account was responsible for the tweet, as Buzzfeed's Brandon Wall helpfully explained:

Moreover, there were a lot more people responding to the tweet and disagreeing with it than liking it.
------

#NotMyAriel was trending because a lot of people were tweeting that it's stupid to be offended by a black Ariel. This is not evidence of a widespread backlash, but evidence against it. Mistakes like these are the result of taking social media too seriously and too literally.
The Backlash Over The Little Mermaid Casting a Black Ariel Is Fake News

So the whole thing was artificially generated. There could be any number of suspects. It could have been a 4chan prank. It could have been the Russians stirring things up. But one theory is Disney created the account and started the controversy. Look at all the free publicity they got out of it. And they get to look like social justice heroes.
Nike got a lot of mileage out of their phony social justice controversy. The director of the new Terminator movie is desperately trying to create a backlash. 'Terminator: Dark Fate' will 'scare the f**k' out of sexist trolls, says director As if fans of the Terminator movies are adverse to strong female characters.
So how about it? Are phony social media outrages the new marketing strategy?
My question is why do so many phony americans cooperate and participate in the very things they decry?
 
Mar 2019
3,285
1,687
"US" of A
#9
There really isn't though. The account that started it was a fake account. And the tweets and posts defending the casting exponentially outnumber the ones that are critical. I think it's a marketing ploy. What better way to get grown adults talking about a Little Mermaid movie?
Anti-social media is fake itself. What better way to get "adults" to make asses of themselves proudly?