SOME Rent Control Is Necessary

johnflesh

Former Staff
Feb 2007
24,391
16,892
Colorado
#22
I agree about a cap on rent, either agreed in writing as a more defined "can raise rent" clause than just the norm - which can put people out on their feet with very little effort.
 
Likes: rwb72
Sep 2014
4,508
1,332
South FL
#26
It doesn't change a damn thing. It keep things the same as they've been along.
No, it doesn't. When people are making the decision whether or not to build housing, surely you must realize that they are considering the amount of income/rent they will be able to make from that investment, right? Well, by putting a ceiling on that, people who otherwise would invest and contribute to the supply of housing - won't.
 
Likes: HayJenn
Sep 2014
4,508
1,332
South FL
#27
I agree in the sense that landlords shouldn't be allowed to just arbitrarily increase rental rates.
Why? Isn't it their property? I mean, I agree, they can't summarily increase it during the tenancy itself, but if the lease is up, on what basis is the landlord equitably beholden to even continue leasing the place?

Nothing unusual about conservatives being self-centered.
So people should spend their time, labor and capital on housing that they let other people use but they're self centered unless its at a price that their tenants think is fair, right?
 
Likes: NeoVsMatrix
Jul 2015
2,691
1,605
Maryland USA
#28
I don't see any of these problems. I've been living here 7 years, and none of those problems have occurred. So if our rents continued as they are, or just went up slightly, things would be THE SAME.
Unfortunately, things are not the same. I noticed that you initially noted that there is a new landlord. So I assume there was a purchase of the complex. I'm guessing that the new landlord has a debt to service that the prior owner did not have. It would also be my guess that the new owner would not have made the investment if the market based rate for such a complex did not accommodate the financing need.

However, I would agree that the old owner (or estate in the event of death) should have advised the tenets that the complex was on the market and that the sale could significantly impact the rent via the market, giving the renters appropriate opportunity to respond. If that did not occur that is not the fault of the new owner. I've seen instances where apartments were converted into condos. In that instance, rent is a moot point.
 
Last edited:
Oct 2014
28,541
4,833
C-A-N-A-D-A-Eh
#29
Why? Isn't it their property? I mean, I agree, they can't summarily increase it during the tenancy itself, but if the lease is up, on what basis is the landlord equitably beholden to even continue leasing the place?
Well, yes... It's a tricky issue in that there are laws that vary significantly on where.

I was generally talking in the sense that if you are renting for say 1000$ / month, it's wrong to just arbitrarily increase to say 1200 per month without some justification... ex: property values in the area went up.
 
Sep 2014
4,508
1,332
South FL
#30
Well, yes... It's a tricky issue in that there are laws that vary significantly on where.

I was generally talking in the sense that if you are renting for say 1000$ / month, it's wrong to just arbitrarily increase to say 1200 per month without some justification... ex: property values in the area went up.
"There is, in fact, no such thing as a measure of value, because there is nothing possessed of the indispensable requisite, invariability of value." -- J.-B. Say, A Treatise of Political Economy