"Special needs" and violence in schools in Canada

The Man

Former Staff
Jul 2011
47,081
34,522
Toronto
#1
The words in the injury reports speak volumes: “I was repeatedly hit on the head, shoulders, chest and back,” wrote an educator in Edmonton, describing an encounter with a violent student at school. A child “scratched both my arms and drew blood,” wrote another.

A third indicates that a student was asked to follow a routine of going to the bathroom and then having a snack with classmates, but “verbally protested no and punched me in the jaw.”

Biting. Kicking. Spitting. Scratching. Punching. Blows to the head. Aggressive, often violent, reported incidents against educators are on the rise, a Globe and Mail survey of data from school boards across the country has found.

Educators at the Toronto District School Board, the country’s largest school district, logged 3,831 reports of workplace violence over the past academic year, up from 1,894 reports in 2014-15. In Edmonton, the number of violent incidents against staff members involving students documented by Edmonton Public Schools more than doubled between the 2015-16 academic year and 2017-18. At the Surrey School District, the largest in B.C., the number of reported violent incidents by a student against a staff member climbed from 190 in 2008-09 to 1,642 in the 2017-18 school year.

New research by University of Ottawa professors Darcy Santor and Chris Bruckert confirms the troubling rise. In a paper released this month, the researchers say that while 7 per cent of educators in Ontario’s schools reported being the target of physical violence by students in 2005, by 2017-18, the rate had increased to 54 per cent experiencing violence by physical force, which included being hit, kicked and bitten by students. It characterizes the rate of violence as “alarmingly high."

While the number of reported incidents is increasing, gaps in the data make it difficult to determine which types of incidents are most frequent, why they’re occurring and the characteristics of the students involved.

Statistics on violence instigated by students against educators is inconsistent across the country, and some boards and provinces don’t even collect them.

But in interviews with The Globe, board administrators and educators cited a handful of factors, including mental-health issues, child poverty and the integration of special-needs students with complex behavioural issues into mainstream classrooms.

The result? Classrooms being repeatedly evacuated because of a disruptive child; staff on medical leave for prolonged periods after being physically hurt; families increasingly asked to pick up their children early or keep them home for an indefinite period because of behavioural issues; and other parents fearing for the safety of their own children.

The Elementary Teachers’ Federation of Ontario describes violence in schools as one of the biggest issues facing its members. In Nova Scotia, one classroom was evacuated 12 times in a month, says Paul Wozney, president of the Nova Scotia Teachers Union, because of a disruptive child. The rest of the students were forced into another room to give the student a chance to calm down. Many teachers and school staff live in a heightened state of anxiety, he said, and it is not uncommon for them to be injured on the job and be fitted with bite-resistant sleeves and other protective equipment.

“At a time when we’re starting to reduce the stigma around PTSD for first responders, for people that serve in the Canadian military … I think we have a lot of road to travel in that regard as it pertains to teachers that suffer violence in the classroom,” he says.
Much more here: As teachers report more violent incidents in schools, boards struggle to manage children with complex needs

I must say, I disagree about blaming "poverty" here.

Look here, for instance
These are kids at a technical school in rural Siberia. None of them are from wealthy families, obviously. Yet, when one tries to assault the elder teacher, for ripping his earphones away, the others do what? Why, jump on that little fucker, drag him away, and deal with him themselves. I am guessing a worse beating for him followed out there, in the hallway, too... hehe

Because, despite all, respect for teachers is still engrained in Russian culture, at all social class levels of that society.

Not so here, unfortuntely. So it seems, to me. It's sad. We let kids get away with all kind of crap, coddle them, and dismiss their outbursts as "special needs", as if it is an illness or something, instead of a disciplinary issue...

That's plain wrong, in my opinion.
 
Mar 2012
57,968
39,519
New Hampshire
#2
Much more here: As teachers report more violent incidents in schools, boards struggle to manage children with complex needs

I must say, I disagree about blaming "poverty" here.

Look here, for instance
These are kids at a technical school in rural Siberia. None of them are from wealthy families, obviously. Yet, when one tries to assault the elder teacher, for ripping his earphones away, the others do what? Why, jump on that little fucker, drag him away, and deal with him themselves. I am guessing a worse beating for him followed out there, in the hallway, too... hehe

Because, despite all, respect for teachers is still engrained in Russian culture, at all social class levels of that society.

Not so here, unfortuntely. So it seems, to me. It's sad. We let kids get away with all kind of crap, coddle them, and dismiss their outbursts as "special needs", as if it is an illness or something, instead of a disciplinary issue...

That's plain wrong, in my opinion.
I think it depends if its a medical issue or not. Some might be on the wrong meds or need help. Others are just little punks. I knew a parent who let her kid hit her and swear when he was young because she thought it was cool. Teachers couldnt touch him or even yell at him and she didnt care. He grew up and is still an asshole.
 

The Man

Former Staff
Jul 2011
47,081
34,522
Toronto
#3
I think it depends if its a medical issue or not. Some might be on the wrong meds or need help. Others are just little punks. I knew a parent who let her kid hit her and swear when he was young because she thought it was cool. Teachers couldnt touch him or even yell at him and she didnt care. He grew up and is still an asshole.
That's basically the story of my sister and elder niece. That girl never saw any discipline whatsoever. To be fair, in this case, maybe it's not that sis wouldn't raise her properly, she couldn't, had no time to. First, bro in law joined the Canadian military and went away to Afghanistan. While sister worked constantly to keep the kids fed. Later, he came back and began working full time in two different jobs; while sis went back to college to get a Canadian degree, to get a better career. So, she was studying all the time.

Meanwhile, the three kids, youngest then just a baby, were looked after by babushkas from the ex-Soviet emigrant community they hired to babysit. Who especially could never keep up with Christina, she was always a bloody trouble maker.

Nor did the old ladies really try to either, I saw how they "worked", I arrived there around that time too haha

Babushka would be sitting around watching TV in the main dining room; while the kids would be running wild, doing whatever they want...

So, of course she, Christina, ended up getting into all kinds of trouble, including drugs. And I was the one who then got her out of it all, me, not her parents...

That's the problem with permissive parenting. Why can't people understand that kids are kids, they are not smart or experienced enough yet, to make own decisions in life...
 
Mar 2019
8,391
2,947
California
#4
Much more here: As teachers report more violent incidents in schools, boards struggle to manage children with complex needs

I must say, I disagree about blaming "poverty" here.

Look here, for instance
These are kids at a technical school in rural Siberia. None of them are from wealthy families, obviously. Yet, when one tries to assault the elder teacher, for ripping his earphones away, the others do what? Why, jump on that little fucker, drag him away, and deal with him themselves. I am guessing a worse beating for him followed out there, in the hallway, too... hehe

Because, despite all, respect for teachers is still engrained in Russian culture, at all social class levels of that society.

Not so here, unfortuntely. So it seems, to me. It's sad. We let kids get away with all kind of crap, coddle them, and dismiss their outbursts as "special needs", as if it is an illness or something, instead of a disciplinary issue...

That's plain wrong, in my opinion.
Nowadays everything is a "Disorder". That "Attention Deficit Disorder" is just an excuse to let permissive PARENTS off the hook.
 
Likes: The Man
Jan 2014
18,163
5,172
California
#5
Much more here: As teachers report more violent incidents in schools, boards struggle to manage children with complex needs

I must say, I disagree about blaming "poverty" here.

Look here, for instance
These are kids at a technical school in rural Siberia. None of them are from wealthy families, obviously. Yet, when one tries to assault the elder teacher, for ripping his earphones away, the others do what? Why, jump on that little fucker, drag him away, and deal with him themselves. I am guessing a worse beating for him followed out there, in the hallway, too... hehe

Because, despite all, respect for teachers is still engrained in Russian culture, at all social class levels of that society.

Not so here, unfortuntely. So it seems, to me. It's sad. We let kids get away with all kind of crap, coddle them, and dismiss their outbursts as "special needs", as if it is an illness or something, instead of a disciplinary issue...

That's plain wrong, in my opinion.
Mr. Man,

Here in California, they are going the other way. New rules, you can no longer suspend or expel a student for being disruptive or willfully defying a teacher or school official.
 
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Ian Jeffrey

Council Hall
Mar 2013
76,664
45,885
Vulcan, down the street from Darth Vader
#6
That "Attention Deficit Disorder" is just an excuse to let permissive PARENTS off the hook.
No, it is not. I have personally witnessed "non-permissive" parents have difficulty coping with an ADHD child. What you are trying to do is to justify violence against children as a disciplinary method.
 

The Man

Former Staff
Jul 2011
47,081
34,522
Toronto
#7
No, it is not. I have personally witnessed "non-permissive" parents have difficulty coping with an ADHD child. What you are trying to do is to justify violence against children as a disciplinary method.
Violence is bad, agreed. I've said it before, I've own experience with that, from childhood, and no intention to subject my kids now to same...

But, is basic spanking considered "violence"?
 

HCProf

Council Hall
Sep 2014
28,830
18,276
USA
#8
Violence is bad, agreed. I've said it before, I've own experience with that, from childhood, and no intention to subject my kids now to same...

But, is basic spanking considered "violence"?
It doesn't do any good with a child with ADD. I have seen parents, back in the day before it was a recognized disorder, try to "beat it" out of them and it just made them more defiant and worse. I am not a big fan of using physical force with children. My parents did not do that and I can't imagine it is healthy for the child mentally. There are other ways. You should start working on your "grave disappointment face" That look will take you to your knees even as an adult. :) I cried for a month when my Dad told me he could not trust me anymore and was distant to me. LOL

As far as the video...that teacher is an idiot. You never yank a pair of ear buds out of a students ear. That is almost assault and could get you fired in the US.
 

The Man

Former Staff
Jul 2011
47,081
34,522
Toronto
#9
It doesn't do any good with a child with ADD. I have seen parents, back in the day before it was a recognized disorder, try to "beat it" out of them and it just made them more defiant and worse. I am not a big fan of using physical force with children. My parents did not do that and I can't imagine it is healthy for the child mentally. There are other ways. You should start working on your "grave disappointment face" That look will take you to your knees even as an adult. :) I cried for a month when my Dad told me he could not trust me anymore and was distant to me. LOL

As far as the video...that teacher is an idiot. You never yank a pair of ear buds out of a students ear. That is almost assault and could get you fired in the US.
It is different over there, more permissible for teachers to get physical with pupils, yes
Majority of older people, raised in Soviet Union, support such behavior by teachers. They think brute force is sometimes needed, to keep unruly kids in line... Say that their teachers once smacked them around too, and they turned out fine lol

I don't know... I think it is somewhat barbaric also, yes, sure...
 
Aug 2018
3,225
5,221
Vancouver
#10
It's a catch 22.

What's worse? Having that violent kid with zero home support integrated into regular school? Or locking him away hidden till he's 18 then chucking him out into society?
 
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