Still believe the crap Apple is telling you?

May 2014
12,533
9,805
American in Socialist Sweden
#2

and just as I did on your reply in the OTHER Apple thread, I will post a few lines from that article.



Apple has provided default encryption on its iPhones since 2014, allowing any device's contents to be accessed only by the user who knows the phone's passcode, the Daily Beast said..

Before that, the company used a less-secure iOS, and could use an extraction tool that would physically plug into the phone and allow it to respond to search warrant requests from the government.

"For all devices running iOS 8 and later versions, Apple will not perform iOS data extractions in response to government search warrants because the files to be extracted are protected by an encryption key that is tied to the user’s passcode, which Apple does not possess," Apple said on its privacy website.

It's not clear how many of the estimated 70 iPhones ran the older, less secure operating systems — iOS 7 and under — and how many used the passcode-required ones, which started with iOS 8.
 
Likes: 3 people
Nov 2013
25,549
21,811
None of your business
#3
and just as I did on your reply in the OTHER Apple thread, I will post a few lines from that article.



Apple has provided default encryption on its iPhones since 2014, allowing any device's contents to be accessed only by the user who knows the phone's passcode, the Daily Beast said..

Before that, the company used a less-secure iOS, and could use an extraction tool that would physically plug into the phone and allow it to respond to search warrant requests from the government.

"For all devices running iOS 8 and later versions, Apple will not perform iOS data extractions in response to government search warrants because the files to be extracted are protected by an encryption key that is tied to the user’s passcode, which Apple does not possess," Apple said on its privacy website.

It's not clear how many of the estimated 70 iPhones ran the older, less secure operating systems — iOS 7 and under — and how many used the passcode-required ones, which started with iOS 8.
I guarantee, Apple has already unlocked that phone, McAfee has offered to do it also.

Regards
Pace
 
Likes: 1 person
Nov 2013
25,549
21,811
None of your business
#8
I don't want the government doing this kind of shit. Neither do some other folks who just don't know it yet.
They have been doing it, and they will do it.

They've been doing this since the 1950's,,, it used to be wiretapping.

Now it's this.

Are you saying that there are people who have something to hide?

Or that the government is so corrupted, so twisted, so evil, that they will use info to declare an enemy of the state? for political reasons?

Hell, if that were the case, the Bundy boys would have been corralled and executed five years ago.

We aren't Russia, we don't hand out polonium cocktails to dissenting voices.

If that's what people want, they can move to Russia.
 
Jun 2014
49,573
50,542
United States
#9
They have been doing it, and they will do it.

They've been doing this since the 1950's,,, it used to be wiretapping.

Now it's this.

Are you saying that there are people who have something to hide?

Or that the government is so corrupted, so twisted, so evil, that they will use info to declare an enemy of the state? for political reasons?

Hell, if that were the case, the Bundy boys would have been corralled and executed five years ago.

We aren't Russia, we don't hand out polonium cocktails to dissenting voices.

If that's what people want, they can move to Russia.

Why move to Russia, when we have the option of voluntarily surrendering our freedom to maintain our rights to privacy.

I mean, terrorists! That's pretty damned scary, amirite?

Who needs freedom, when they can have "security" instead?
 
Likes: 1 person
Dec 2010
36,825
28,616
Virginia
#10
First, it's a different version of the OS than the other phones (as I understand it.)
Second, some folks didn't change their password from the default (again as I understand it.)

The real question is this: Why can't they just image the drive (thereby preserving the original) plug the data into a new phone and try their attack?
Wash, rinse, repeat...

Apple doesn't need to do a thing in such a case.