Strict new voting law allowed to stay in New Hampshire

Mar 2012
60,128
41,546
New Hampshire
Out of state college kids can no longer vote here..Going to really make things interesting up here.

A controversial new voter registration law requiring proof of domicile will remain in effect until at least after the Nov. 6 midterm elections after the state Supreme Court ruled late Friday afternoon that it’s too late to turn back now.

The voter registration law known as Senate Bill 3 will stay in place through the upcoming midterms, after the New Hampshire Supreme Court on Friday overruled a lower court's order that would have put the law on hold. The status of out-of-state college students is at the center of the ongoing debate over voting laws in the Granite State, and Judge Brown specifically mentioned them in his ruling, claiming: “A number of New Hampshire college students testified to being confused or intimidated by the forms.”

The decision from the high court capped off a rollercoaster week for election officials in New Hampshire. On Monday, Hillsborough County Superior Court Judge Kenneth Brown ordered them to stop using Senate Bill 3 (or “SB3”) in the upcoming midterms. The timing of Judge Brown’s order, the justices wrote, “entered by the trial court a mere two weeks before the November 6 election, creates both a substantial risk of confusion and disruption of the orderly conduct of the election, and the prospect that similarly situated voters may be subjected to differing voter registration and voting procedures in the same election cycle.”

N.H. Supreme Court Says SB3 Can Stay In Place, Reversing Lower Court Order
State prevails; SB 3 will be in effect for midterms
 
Mar 2012
60,128
41,546
New Hampshire
Update:

A federal judge on Wednesday denied a request to grant a preliminary injunction that would have blocked the state’s voter residency law from being enforced for the New Hampshire presidential primary in February.

That means people who vote in the state who are not residents must take action to become residents, such as getting a New Hampshire’s driver’s license or registering their vehicles in the state.

In its motion requesting a preliminary injunction, the ACLU argued the law “created significant confusion” by citing cases of students attending colleges and universities in New Hampshire, but who still have driver’s licenses or vehicles registered and insured in other states.

 
  • Wow
Reactions: the bull59
Jun 2014
51,697
53,625
United States
So, if NH doesn't want college students to vote, do they also plan to stop using the students' census numbers toward their allotment of presidential electors?
 
Mar 2012
60,128
41,546
New Hampshire
So, if NH doesn't want college students to vote, do they also plan to stop using the students' census numbers toward their allotment of presidential electors?
This whole thing is becoming a mess. Now town clerks dont even really know what to do. I guess it was a bit surprising the judge ruled this way since it requires them to have a NH drivers license or registration if they live out of state. We literally have tons of kids from other New England states and vice versa. Many use a parents car not their own. This has just created utter confusion.
 
Mar 2012
60,128
41,546
New Hampshire
where do they declare their permanent residence to be?
The problem is that college dorms no longer can be a "permanent residence." Prior to this, it was allowed to be. Now only an in state address will be accepted for voting. So if a student lives out of state, they either must get a NH license or get an absentee ballot for ID purposes to vote. The biggest issue is this was a bit unexpected so now there is a scramble since the primary is two months away. I imagine most out of state kids will now get absentee ballots from the state where they came from. In 2016, the number of out of state students that voted in NH was a bit over 6000.