Supreme Justices spent the morning talking about an 'f word'

Dec 2015
11,474
6,877
From Your Heart!
#1
Supreme Justices spent the morning talking about an 'f word'
The high court heard arguments in clothing line trademark case — but the discussion was far from routine.
By Pete Williams

"WASHINGTON — A bare majority of the U.S. Supreme Court seemed prepared Monday to allow a trademark for a California clothing brand that uses a form of the f-word. But the justices didn't appear very happy about the prospect."
"How is it determined?" asked Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, "that a word is shocking? Is it a substantial part of the public? Would a composite of 20-year-olds find it shocking?"
"Justice Elena Kagan said the law sweeps more broadly. "If Congress wants to pass a narrow statute, it can do that," she said. "You're asking us to uphold the statute based on a commitment to apply it more narrowly. That's a strange thing for us to do."









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One has to ask if such words are to be disclaimed from usage in clothes in America then it appears obvious that usage of words like that in common speaking should also become offenses punishable under the law. If one is held to be free speech but the other usage is not then there is no equity or parity to be derived from such usage under any circumstances at all.
 
Likes: Madeline
Jun 2014
60,073
34,369
Cleveland, Ohio
#2
Supreme Justices spent the morning talking about an 'f word'
The high court heard arguments in clothing line trademark case — but the discussion was far from routine.
By Pete Williams














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One has to ask if such words are to be disclaimed from usage in clothes in America then it appears obvious that usage of words like that in common speaking should also become offenses punishable under the law. If one is held to be free speech but the other usage is not then there is no equity or parity to be derived from such usage under any circumstances at all.
IMO, "cursing in public" laws already violate the first amendment.
 
Likes: Friday13

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